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Applying to my job? I have a question for you!

Active Member
Ronnie J R Member Since: Oct 1, 2012
51 of 55
The question that especially annoys me (and this annoyed me when I interviewed for traditional jobs) is "Why did you apply for this particular job?" It sounds like they want you to say "It's been my burning desire to work for this company doing this job since I was a little boy/girl." Anybody with half a brain knows the real answer is "Because I'm a fan of buying groceries and paying rent." A lot of the pregenerated questions can be answered by either reading the cover letter or the profile. If you need a way to cull the herd, you can go by cost or feedback scores or some other combination of factors. But (and this is really more my opinion) posting these asinine questions will probably weed out good talented contractors and just leave the ones who know how to blow smoke. End rant.
Community Guru
Joseph C Member Since: Nov 5, 2011
52 of 55
[quote=Ronnie J Rigdon]"Because I'm a fan of buying groceries and paying rent."[/quote] I have got to remember that one.
Community Guru
Aseem B Member Since: Dec 20, 2014
53 of 55

I recently came across a job posting(Category: Software Development) and even though the client and the job posting both look genuine, I was a bit surprised(and amused) to see the questions. I wanted to share the questions here although "Announcements" section may not be the right place(Please remove the post in this case). The cleint mentions in the job posting "don't forget to answer all my questions because is really important is you want to get to the short list"

Here are some of the questions:

1)why minions like bananas?

2)why do you think you are the right person for the job?

3)if ironman (Tonny stark) exist in our realm, he will party 24/7 ?

4)if the possible is imposible, why the imposible is probable?

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
54 of 55

Regarding some previous comments in this thread:

 

"How can someone make such suggestions when they have not even worked on the job..."

 

"...you can suggest... But not in case wherein the requirement is not specific. You can not say until you do not have entire requirement in front of you to analyse..."

 

There is a certain class of contractor -- a contractor at a certain level of sophistication -- who needs detailed requirement specifications in order to make suggestions. I think this may be something they learned in school. Some college degree programs teach a certain series of steps, which involve gathering requirements in a certain way before designing solutions to those requirements.

 

There is another class of a contractor, a more pro-active, more advanced type of contractor, who is not limited by anybody else's traditional rule book, and can look at whatever it is a client can provide, and tell the client what he can do for him to move his project along.

 

For every contractor who looks at a job description and says to themself:

"I can't offer suggestions for ideas for this project, even as part of a casual interview process, because I don't know enough."

 

...There is another contractor who will be more likely to get the job because he takes what is available and shows he is a person who can provide value to a client, even when the client isn't a "perfect" client who completely and fully knows what he needs.

 

What if one job candidate simply said: "I don't know what to do next" and anther candidate said "The next thing we should do is make a list of project requirements."

Community Guru
Darrin O Member Since: Jan 20, 2015
55 of 55

@Preston H wrote:

There is another class of a contractor, a more pro-active, more advanced type of contractor, who is not limited by anybody else's traditional rule book, and can look at whatever it is a client can provide, and tell the client what he can do for him to move his project along.


And then there is another, even more sophisticated, class of contractor who can look a project and say "this has failed before it has even begun, so I'm not even going to bother to apply."  After all, it takes no real skill to say "Yes, If" to someone in order to get them to part with their money.  Any con man can do that.  A true professional learns to say "No, Because".

http://www.davecoddington.com/apple-there-are-a-thousand-nos-for-every-yes/

 

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