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Re: How new pricing works for freelancers - frequently asked questions

cegaros
Active Member
Carlos G Member Since: Sep 6, 2015
81 of 1,013

I have read the posts of this girl, and she only answer the fee questions as a Lorem Ipsum. Such a shame. 


@Lena E wrote:

Steve,

 

If you bid $500 on a new project with a NEW client then you will pay the 20% fee. If you bid $10,000 on a new project, with a new client, you will pay 20% on the first $500, then 10% fee on $9,500. (Assuming these are new clients and you don't already have a history of earnings with them.)

 

-Lena


 

boxon
Ace Contributor
Bojan J Member Since: Nov 23, 2015
82 of 1,013

Maximilian,

I was amazed with you earnings, so I checked your Profile.

And it shows that you had only 1 client worth mentioning, all other jobs was average of 697$, 517$, and so on. Aren't you able to realistically calculate you earnings, and see how badly you will be affected by this decision?

katrinabeaver
Community Guru
Katrina B Member Since: Jan 9, 2011
83 of 1,013

This will hurt some and help others as any new change does.  Me, my fee will stay the same because most of my long term clients haven't reached the $10,000 mark yet.  I will be glad when we do though. 

"Fairness is giving all people the treatment they earn and deserve. It doesn't mean treating everyone alike-Coach John Wooden"
versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
84 of 1,013

I'm happy and I'm not happy. I'm happy because whatever hurt lowballers make me happy. Then, since I'm working mainly with one-offs, I will basically have to raise my fees by 10%. Ok, consider that to be done, I'm officially charging more per word than I had yesterday.

 

If Upwork brings more business to the platform, and in better quality, I'm all in although.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
cybernesco
Ace Contributor
Denis P Member Since: Mar 25, 2016
85 of 1,013

I think the way those fees are setup for both, contractors and clients, will definitely help in filtering out some of the wannabes, the $3.00 an hour guy and the scammers, hence making a more valuable Upwork in the process for everybody. Time to jack-up your hourly rate guys

bjerew
Active Member
Benjamin E J Member Since: Oct 26, 2015
86 of 1,013

I couldn't have said it better myself!

boxon
Ace Contributor
Bojan J Member Since: Nov 23, 2015
87 of 1,013

Lowballers are eliminated by any serious client, who needs to get the job done. So this will not affect them, but all of us, because lowballers bid for 50$ on 500$ job, and we count on this income to really feed our families.

And when we all raise or fee, average client would review offers,  just say "Wow", and give up. So, we will all (but lowballers) get hurt.

I guess that I will have more free time to work on private projects, since I don't intend to work for peanuts.

justyourtype
Community Leader
Sue B Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
88 of 1,013

"Since I'm working mainly with one-offs, I will basically have to raise my fees by 10%."

 

 

One would think so, but it's actually more. For example:

 

Current rate:  $100 Net: $90 with 10% fee.

 

Proposed rate: $110   Net: only $88 with new 20% fee.

 

Actual rate needed:  $112.50   Net: $90.

 

 

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
89 of 1,013

re: "Me, my fee will stay the same because most of my long term clients haven't reached the $10,000 mark yet."

 

Katrina:

I see no reason to lower your fees for clients once you have reached $10,000.

 

I'm not going to.

 

If my clients are charged $X number of dollars per hour, that's how much they pay regardless of whether I keep 90% of the pay, or 95% of the pay. It's all the same to them.

katrinabeaver
Community Guru
Katrina B Member Since: Jan 9, 2011
90 of 1,013

No, I'm not lowering my fees

"Fairness is giving all people the treatment they earn and deserve. It doesn't mean treating everyone alike-Coach John Wooden"
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