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Insight on how Job Success Score is calculated

Active Member
Karen B Member Since: Aug 4, 2015
51 of 317

Hi,

 

Perhaps this is a silly question to ask here, but as I'm not sure of where to ask it, and it is related to the subject, I'll just go for broke here.  I'm really, terribly new here, and as I've been browsing through the pages, I stumbled upon your post.  My concern is that as a new, and therefore entirely untried member of this community, I HAVE no job success scores.  How will I ever advance, if clients expect JSS from me?  It's the same old story, isn't it?  You need experience to get the jobs, but you cant't GET the expereince WITHOUT the jobs.  How is one to navigate this hurdle?

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Karen

Moderator
Valeria K Moderator Member Since: Mar 6, 2014
52 of 317

Hi Karen,

 

It's true that Job Success score can only be calculated once you complete a few jobs and may take some time and persistence to get your first job. Since your profile doesn't have feedback from clients and Job Success score yet, you will need to rely on your profile overview and cover letters to impress potential clients and stand out of the crowd. 

 

Check out this thread for more tips on how to get that first job and this video about improving your profile.

~ Valeria
Untitled
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
53 of 317

Karen, EVERY contractor on Upwork had to start at some point in the past with zero job history, zero feedback, zero job score.

 

So, by definition, it is clearly possible to get hired and begin working if you do not yet have these things.

 

Are there SOME clients looking for a certain minimum job score? Yes. Are there SOME jobs that specify a minimum job score? Yes.

 

But there are many more that do not have these requirements.

 

I suggest not being TOO picky regarding your first few jobs. Apply to appropriate jobs you know you can do well, and do a great job for those clients. Then you'll get on the playing field with a job score and feedback and you will be able to succeed.

Community Guru
Darrin O Member Since: Jan 20, 2015
54 of 317

@Preston H wrote:

I suggest not being TOO picky regarding your first few jobs. Apply to appropriate jobs you know you can do well, and do a great job for those clients. Then you'll get on the playing field with a job score and feedback and you will be able to succeed.


I disagree.  If you're not picky enough, you'll end up with terrible clients who will damage your stats to the point where you may find it difficult to get other work here.  On the flip side, if you do a great job for a client, they may not want to end your contract, and that will hurt your stats as well.

 

Newcomers are the most under served population on Upwork.  It's like they built the platform purposely to be unattractive to anyone who has just discovered the site.  They really should address this if they want to bring in more people.

 

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
55 of 317

re: "do the clients see our ratings to them? I can't even remember if we have questions like 'would you recommend this client' or 'would you work with this client again'"

 

No.

 

Contractors can not see clients' private feedback.

Clients can not see contractors' private feedback.

Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
56 of 317

ok. 

 

so this is definitely much easier for client or freelancer to be spiteful.... 

Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
57 of 317

Darrin O wrote:

On the flip side, if you do a great job for a client, they may not want to end your contract, and that will hurt your stats as well.

 

 

BINGO!!!!!!!

 

 

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
58 of 317

@Mariska P wrote:

@Darrin O wrote:

On the flip side, if you do a great job for a client, they may not want to end your contract, and that will hurt your stats as well.

 

 

BINGO!!!!!!!

 

 


At least Upwork has finally quantified for us that inactive contracts should be closed within 90 days, and (they claim) offers clients two reminders to do so. This rather relieves the prior uncertainty about their standards, and allows us to lay out this requirement for intermittent contracts with clients at the outset.

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
59 of 317

@Darrin O wrote:

Newcomers are the most under served population on Upwork.  It's like they built the platform purposely to be unattractive to anyone who has just discovered the site.  They really should address this if they want to bring in more people.

 


Darrin,

 

There's no reason to believe they want any such thing. I have no idea how oDesk was marketed in the past; Elance went through a long, embarrassing recruitment campaign suggesting freelancing is something one does casually, on the fly, without apoparent effort. I called it the "freelance in your sleep" campaign. One particularly excruciating video, if memory serves, suggested "working" while bicycling—yes, actually while bicycling—around a beach town. Once the numbers were pumped up enough to make that money-losing platform attractive enough to be merged with oDesk, both platforms began cutting their newly-designated deadwood. In short, Upwork now has a surplus of assets/inventory (us and the endless supply of inevitable replacements).

 

The wave of Upwork's apparent future is to attract bigger, longer-term contracts from bigger clients, with a range of services from "bring your own contractors" to "let us recruit for you." Whether their business model serves our business models remains to be seen.

 

Best,

Michael

Community Guru
Darrin O Member Since: Jan 20, 2015
60 of 317

@Douglas Michael M wrote:
There's no reason to believe they want any such thing.

This is true.  Nobody here really knows what direction Upwork ultimately is looking to go.  All I can speak to is what make a company healthy, and Upwork has a lot of work to do if they want to get there, by whatever means they choose.


The wave of Upwork's apparent future is to attract bigger, longer-term contracts from bigger clients, with a range of services from "bring your own contractors" to "let us recruit for you." Whether their business model serves our business models remains to be seen.


I question whether it actually servers their business model.  For example, there are many larger recruiting agencies I know of that maintain their own set of "on the bench" contractors.  They give work preferentially to those people, and that makes it easier to skim off the profits that are to be had.  There is definitely suspicion Upwork is heading in that direction, especially with their bragging of "we now give a subset of our freelancers twice as much of the available work".

 

The problem in doing that, though, is that they're no longer working in the best interests of the client.  They're no longer out looking for the highest quality talent available, so they'll only do well so long as there is a race to the bottom.  But once that race ends, they're at the bottom, so it's hard to pat Upwork on the back for winning at that.

 

For Upwork's sake, let's hope they're not being so short sighted.  But given how many companies have shifted to focus on quarterly earnings, you may be right in thinking they're not in it for the long haul.  I give them until the end of the year to prove us both wrong.