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Testing freelancer location for job posts

Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
51 of 257

Garnor wrote:  "we allow clients to search and hire based on a freelancer’s location because we recognize that some projects may require localized knowledge, work within certain time zones, or other factors that require the freelancer be in a specific location."

 

Buyers have always had the option to include these requirements in their RFPs.  

 

Your rebutal comments, please.

 

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
52 of 257

@Wendy C wrote:

Garnor wrote:  "we allow clients to search and hire based on a freelancer’s location because we recognize that some projects may require localized knowledge, work within certain time zones, or other factors that require the freelancer be in a specific location."

 

Buyers have always had the option to include these requirements in their RFPs

 


 Yes, and for many, MANY years clients have been complaining very loudly that this is not stopping them from being spammed by dozens of freelancers who don't fit that.

 

I am not sure what the big issue with the bank details is.

 

In Europe every business has their banking details on all their stationary and even on websites. Nobody can do a thing with your account number and routing.... Sure people can SEnd you money with those details, but not withdraw. What is the big deal?

 

That said, I just noticed that I am being asked to verify my US bank account... I am not in the US LOL

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
53 of 257
I can confirm that an off-platform European client recently asked me for my banking details in order to pay me, as he would have asked a European colleague.

He was surprised at the US system, where eventually a fourth party to the transaction, utterly unknown to me, asked for my banking details, in accordance with our cultural norms.
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
54 of 257

@Douglas Michael M wrote:
I can confirm that an off-platform European client recently asked me for my banking details in order to pay me, as he would have asked a European colleague.

He was surprised at the US system, where eventually a fourth party to the transaction, utterly unknown to me, asked for my banking details, in accordance with our cultural norms.

He quite possibly wouldn't have had to ask a European colleague, the European colleague would have it on all the footers of their business stationary, or quite possibly even on a page of their website. It is considered much the same as the address and phone number.


All anyone can do with my bank account details is send me money. I am fine with people sending me money Smiley Wink

Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
55 of 257

Petra, the negative feedback on this being tested change is twofold:

 

1. Privacy concerns.  And yep, I've lived overseas and do understand the concern is US centric ... 

 

2. The core inequity of the change. It is discriminatory; esp. because the jargon being used to explain it is totally misleading.  

 

Example:  You are German (if memory serves) yet you live in Italy. Should you be eliminated from being able to bid on German localization simply because you don't live in Germany?

 

People, please do not reiterate that non-German (or US) based providers can still bid.  The discriminatory skew has already been established in the buyers' mind.

 

Back however many pages I offered the suggestion that U. create a sub-heading to each category.  

"Need a provider local to you"

Buyers could post on-site, etc. gigs in there.  

 

I'm not a coder but my guess restricting proposals to the applicable areas is not that hard.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
56 of 257

@Wendy C wrote:

Petra, the negative feedback on this being tested change is twofold:

 

1. Privacy concerns.  And yep, I've lived overseas and do understand the concern is US centric ... 

 

2. The core inequity of the change. It is discriminatory; esp. because the jargon being used to explain it is totally misleading.  

 

Example:  You are German (if memory serves) yet you live in Italy. Should you be eliminated from being able to bid on German localization simply because you don't live in Germany?

 

People, please do not reiterate that non-German (or US) based providers can still bid.  The discriminatory skew has already been established in the buyers' mind.


1. I *hear* you - I just mentioned it as a bit of a US (and UK, actually) eccentricity Smiley Wink

 

2. Actually, under this new thing I could NOT bid because I would not even see the job posted. All those US jobs that are being tested on I can not bid on because I can't see them. Only people in the US can see them.

I don't LIKE this, I am purely saying that it IS something that clients have been asking for over and over and over again.


And yes, I already miss out on various jobs where clients want a native German speaker who actually lives in Germany. At the end of the day if that's the case so be it. Client's decision.

Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
57 of 257

Petra, thanks for writing you don't like this any more than I do.  Somewhere above I thought Garnor wrote that it was still possible for others to bid. Now it is even more discriminatory. Smiley Sad

 

Clients ask for a lot of things - free work; school work. etc.  These, however, seem to fly well below the importance radar despite comments to the contrary.

 

Programmers, how hard would it be to add the sub-category to each major cat mentioned above?

 

 

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@Wendy C wrote:

Petra, thanks for writing you don't like this any more than I do.  Somewhere above I thought Garnor wrote that it was still possible for others to bid. Now it is even more discriminatory. Smiley Sad

 

Clients ask for a lot of things - free work; school work. etc.  These, however, seem to fly well below the importance radar despite comments to the contrary.

 

Programmers, how hard would it be to add the sub-category to each major cat mentioned above?

 

 


 Thank you, Wendy! In fact you seem to be the only one of the US freelancers who regrets this feature. All others seem to be very content with it, at least they are very calm, especially the high potential earners who regularly have their say on nearly everything. 

In a thread in the TR community a US freelancer thanked Upwork for this overdue feature and labeled freelancers from 'oversees' as 'noise'. This 'noise' made it difficult for him to be hired from US companies in the past. The only concern for some freelancers from the US is that some of them are asked for their bank details. Again, thank you, Wendy!

 

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
59 of 257

Margarete, it is totally understandable that US freelancers support this. Actually, if Upwork allowed clients to restrict the visibility of their postings to some specific countries, as I suggested earlier in this post, you and I would benefit from it too. I wouldn't complain.

 

I may be wrong but I think that translators won't be much impacted by this change since many translation clients demand people from a specific country. I often see clients asking for native French speakers preferably from France and I bet you see the same with German.

 

But yes, this will have a negative impact on some non-US freelancers who are in non language-related industries, or for native English-speaking writers living outside of the US.

 

What can we do? Nothing. If this is a feature that was requested by clients and if the trial period proves that it generates more business for Upwork, it will stay. Upwork can switch its business model or even go down any time. Unfortunately this is the harsh truth that we have no control over.

 

We'll see, as the wise man says.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
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@Rene K wrote:

Margarete, it is totally understandable that US freelancers support this. Actually, if Upwork allowed clients to restrict the visibility of their postings to some specific countries, as I suggested earlier in this post, you and I would benefit from it too. I wouldn't complain.

 

I may be wrong but I think that translators won't be much impacted by this change since many translation clients demand people from a specific country. I often see clients asking for native French speakers preferably from France and I bet you see the same with German.

 

But yes, this will have a negative impact on some non-US freelancers who are in non language-related industries, or for native English-speaking writers living outside of the US.

 

What can we do? Nothing. If this is a feature that was requested by clients and if the trial period proves that it generates more business for Upwork, it will stay. Upwork can switch its business model or even go down any time. Unfortunately this is the harsh truth that we have no control over.

 

We'll see, as the wise man says.


I can always understand the motives of anybody on this planet. That does not necessarily mean that I accept and like them. Clients could always restrict their job offers by sending invites. I do not need a feature restricting job offers to countries because I help clients worldwide being successful with their business in Germany.

 

I do not regard myself being a translator although I do translations sometimes. That is not my main business. I operate in some niches with already few opportunities on Upwork and most US freelancers are not be able to compete with me. However, for many other freelancers this feature will have severe effects.

 

Clients demanded this feature: I can only speculate about their motives and I think they are not mainly driven by the motive that they are looking for a freelancer in their neighbourhood. I remember an enterprise job offer from a large US Upwork client a few weeks ago for translators for several countries with the remark on the job offer: No freelancers from (insert several countries).

 

You think you can do nothing. It is your decision. Although freelancers are unable to change Upwork's decision, those being affected negatively or disliking this feature can think about adapting and reacting to this and they have to. Questions for example: How can I compensate business I might loose by this new feature? How much of my valuable time will I invest in reporting fake jobs, fake profiles, academic fraud job offers, helping other freelancers with VAT, invoice or other problems, analysing bugs and participating in discussions?

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