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Re: Advice required about early terminate hired freelancer

Ace Contributor
Victor D Member Since: Oct 6, 2015
1 of 4

Am seeking a little advice from either Upwork or client community...

 

I recently hired a freelancer who is also new Upwork himself and therefore had no feedback...

 

In the seeking of a truly creative type of person who could come up with a unique idea as a second option to that which I had already received from another. After conversations with this second freelancer I decided to hire them...

 

After the first draft of work was submitted (for a "creative" logo), it seemed blindingly obvious me that continuation on this path was not going to produce anything worthwhile... (I definitely do not consider using a 2D stick drawing that looked like it came from a 1985 commons icon image bank to be a sign of "creativity" from a budding graphcs design student).

 

So after considering quite carefully over 24 hours and in not wanting to discourage this person or hurt their feelings, I reluctantly had to write them a message via Upt messaging explaining my disappointment with the effort and that I wished to terminate the contract without further dispute and made them an offer for work done thus far that was lower than the original agreed price... Not that I consider the first draft of said work to be of any value to me, other than as an investment in experience and learning.

 

Although disappointed they've amicably agreed to this termination and my question is:

Although the initial agreed job price was for a higher value, the agreed "out" price is 60% lower so, before I go pushing any buttons that finalize this job within my account to release funds, how do I go about changing the final price to the new agreed "value" and not accidently commit to the original job price un-altered?

 

Thanks

 

V

 

 

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
2 of 4

I think you handled that well Smiley Happy

 

It's very easy to do what you're suggesting. I assume the full value was funded into Escrow? When making the payment you can actually edit the amount you want to pay, and thus request for the rest to be returned to your payment method. This releases the 60% to them.

 

So if the full value was $ 200, put in $ 120 to be released for example.

 

The freelancer then has 3 choices:

 

They can approve the return of the rest of the funds and the money goes back straight away. As you already agreed on that tis is your most likely outcome.

 

They can dispute the return, but you already agreed so they won't

 

They can do nothing, then the 40% will go back to you after 7 days.

Ace Contributor
Victor D Member Since: Oct 6, 2015
3 of 4

Thanks Petra,

 

Yes it was funded by escrow...

 

I've actioned that now as you've suggested.

 

Thanks for your time to reply,

 

Vic

Highlighted
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 4

Victor, you seem like a stand-up guy and a very professional client.

 

Art is subjective.

As a client, you shouldn't feel bad if a contractor's artwork doesn't match your your vision for the project.

 

Sometimes even very talented artists will be a poor match for a particular project, and the best thing to do is to have them stop working on it as a soon as possible.

 

Aside from that, some contractors end up being less than advertised. And you're under no obligation to continue working with somebody if you're not thrilled with the work they have turned in for you.

 

I have hired artists and then closed the contract after only 30 minutes of work with no more explanation other than telling them I have decided to go a different direction.

 

So don't agonize over moving on to somebody else, especially since you are doing so in such an equitable manner.

 

You are using a fixed-price contract. If you want even more flexibility and possibly cost savings (depending upon who and how you hire), you may want to experiment with using hourly contracts as well.

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