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Re: Annoying and pathetic support from Upwork

e9936f08
Active Member
Martin K Member Since: Aug 18, 2016
11 of 20

@Nichola No, what my writers do is like what journalists do. Many newspapers have articles reviewing products. Check the "Indybest" section here: http://www.independent.co.uk/us

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
12 of 20

@Martin K wrote:

@Nichola No, what my writers do is like what journalists do. Many newspapers have articles reviewing products. Check the "Indybest" section here: http://www.independent.co.uk/us


I think you're missing the difference. The big sites obtain the product, use it, test it, and then write about their experience. You are asking for fake reviews. We all know you are. There is no way to review something if the person isn't buying it. The only thing they will do is rewrite someone else's review, and a lot of people are cracking down on that shady practice.

e9936f08
Active Member
Martin K Member Since: Aug 18, 2016
13 of 20

@Jennifer Some big sites do obtain the product and then write about their experience. But lot's of sites, including well-known newspapers don't. That is also a fact. It is possible to research products and write a review based on that. A fake review is where someone pretends to have used a product and creates a review on sites like Amazon or Tripadvisor. This is something comletely different from what I am doing.

 

 
 
colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
14 of 20

 

 


@Martin K wrote:

@Jennifer Some big sites do obtain the product and then write about their experience. But lot's of sites, including well-known newspapers don't. That is also a fact. It is possible to research products and write a review based on that. A fake review is where someone pretends to have used a product and creates a review on sites like Amazon or Tripadvisor. This is something comletely different from what I am doing.

 

 
 

It is only possible, as with any research subject, if the writer cites every source - i.e. every genuine review and draws a conclusion, but then this would not be a review.

 

I don't quite see how 'reviews' - sorry, well-researched articles spun from customer (possibly genuine) reviews on Amazon - on DIY products, can be seen as anything other than fake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
15 of 20

@Martin K wrote:

@Jennifer Some big sites do obtain the product and then write about their experience. But lot's of sites, including well-known newspapers don't. That is also a fact. It is possible to research products and write a review based on that. A fake review is where someone pretends to have used a product and creates a review on sites like Amazon or Tripadvisor. This is something comletely different from what I am doing.

 

 
 

OK. I have no idea if they do or not, and I would bet neither do you. But you aren't them. It's been a while since I read the info on Amazon cracking down, but IIRC they were going after sites that facilitated fraud on their products. This is why Upwork is senstiive to fraudulent, fake reviews which is what you're looking for. 

e9936f08
Active Member
Martin K Member Since: Aug 18, 2016
16 of 20

@nichola you said: "I don't quite see how 'reviews' - sorry, well-researched articles spun from customer (possibly genuine) reviews on Amazon - on DIY products, can be seen as anything other than fake."

If the articles are well-researched and provide useful information they are not fake. Fake reviews are where the writer pretends they have used the product when they have not used it with the intent to deceive people.

 

@Jennifer

Take a look at htis article: http://www.independent.co.uk/extras/indybest/house-garden/best-corner-sofas-2016-uk-a7184761.html

Do you think the author obtained all the sofas to test them out? I think it is unlikely. Note how this newspaper has affiliate links in their articles.

 

@Jennifer I object to this statement that you made: "This is why Upwork is senstiive to fraudulent, fake reviews which is what you're looking for. "
The reviews I am looking for are not fake or fraudulent. I am looking for accourate and useful reviews. It is important that Upwork support can distinguish between fake reviews and legitimate reviews.

 

If you want to understnad what "fake reviews" means, see this thread: https://www.amazon.com/forum/top%20reviewers?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx2Z5LRXMSUDQH2&cdThread=Tx23EE7...

 

 

 

 

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
17 of 20

@Martin K wrote:

@nichola you said: "I don't quite see how 'reviews' - sorry, well-researched articles spun from customer (possibly genuine) reviews on Amazon - on DIY products, can be seen as anything other than fake."

If the articles are well-researched and provide useful information they are not fake. Fake reviews are where the writer pretends they have used the product when they have not used it with the intent to deceive people.

 

@Jennifer

Take a look at htis article: http://www.independent.co.uk/extras/indybest/house-garden/best-corner-sofas-2016-uk-a7184761.html

Do you think the author obtained all the sofas to test them out? I think it is unlikely. Note how this newspaper has affiliate links in their articles.

 

@Jennifer I object to this statement that you made: "This is why Upwork is senstiive to fraudulent, fake reviews which is what you're looking for. "
The reviews I am looking for are not fake or fraudulent. I am looking for accourate and useful reviews. It is important that Upwork support can distinguish between fake reviews and legitimate reviews.

 

If you want to understnad what "fake reviews" means, see this thread: https://www.amazon.com/forum/top%20reviewers?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx2Z5LRXMSUDQH2&cdThread=Tx23EE7...

 

 

 

 


The first link you gave is  more like a list of product descriptions, and certainly wouldn't float my boat. But I agree, they are not too offensively fake, although  the writer  is not likely ever to have established if the items she describes are actually comfy or whether they can accommodate an entire family.

stencil_media
Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
18 of 20

@Martin K wrote:

@Jennifer Some big sites do obtain the product and then write about their experience. But lot's of sites, including well-known newspapers don't. That is also a fact. It is possible to research products and write a review based on that. A fake review is where someone pretends to have used a product and creates a review on sites like Amazon or Tripadvisor. This is something comletely different from what I am doing. 

 

Am I missing something or is this what you're saying:

 

A fake review is where someone pretends to have used a product and creates a review on sites like Amazon or Tripadvisor. And therefore, as a result... a non-fake review is where someone pretends to have used a product and creates a review on your website?

 

 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
sam-sly
Community Guru
Samantha S Member Since: Jun 23, 2016
19 of 20

Since I didn't see your listing, I don't know the exact problem. But my guess is the way you phrased it is too close to something spammy or dubious and a freelancer noticed and flagged you. When staff looked at it, they had the same impression. I am frequently invited to write fake reviews (usually to publish on Amazon) and I do flag those invitations.

 

From what you write, I think I know the type of content you are writing. It can be very useful if done well. But it is not a 'review". I have written this type of content and I write actual reviews (a few every week for about two years now). The actual reviews... The company sends me a product, I spend time using it, make notes abut the pros and cons, take pictures or videos of it in use, and I write a review. Sometimes I publish my review on Amazon or a retail site and if I think the product is interesting enough I post a more detailed version on my blog or make a YouTube video. I cannot accept payment from the company other than a free or discounted product, and I must disclose to my readers that I received a promotional item or review copy. Sometimes I do something like a review for my own site that I am paid for, I call it a sponsored post.

 

I also have done the type of writing you describe. It isn't a review as the writers usually have no experience with the product. I guess I would refer to it as an article since you are basically curating and commenting on other people's reviews. This writing can be low in quality if it is simply "spun" or scraped from other sources without adding anything new to the table (usually this is the case, but not always). I don't know whether that is against rules or not, but as a reader, I would like to see less of this copied and spun content on the web.  The better quality versions of this where sources are credited and the writer adds something unique are helpful to readers who don't have time to search for all the reviews. I would describe the better versions more as a consumer guide, product comparison guide, or something like that. it isn't really a review of products. 

 

I am not sure what UpWork's actual problem was. But there are a lot of dubious jobs in this area that should be banned. Maybe yours just seemed like one of those. If it is not, maybe try rewriting the description.

e9936f08
Active Member
Martin K Member Since: Aug 18, 2016
20 of 20

@Samantha S  Thanks a lot for giving a useful reply. I think your description of what might have happened is probably accurate.

 

Perhaps I should avoid the use of the word "review" in job descriptions. Also I have found that mentioning the word "Amazon" in any job description is inviting trouble--in the past I used to write "a famous ecommerce company beginning with A".

 

I wish Upwork had some way of escalating or complaining about such issues. This issue has happened to me repeatedly in the past but there is no way for them to learn about this kind of issue..

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