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App developer fraud

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Alexey B Member Since: Mar 5, 2014
1 of 2
Have any body got into trouble with app developers not finishing their work, even they have have got pay in full agreed amount? Anyway to legally and publicly to shut them down from corrupting Odesk community?
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Exp U Member Since: Oct 29, 2014
2 of 2
Not to add negativity to your current problems; but why did you pay in full before receiving and testing the deliverables? I'm guessing it was a guaranteed hourly job. You're much better off with fixed-rate for this sort of project. There is a window of time when you can take out a support ticket and contest the charges (for the last week if it's hourly). You're advised to take out a support ticket in any case...you may not get your money back but it could save someone else in the future...contractors and clients both have disputes monitored and -while it may not be possible to do anything about a first complaint as it's often word-against-word- repeated patterns get noticed. EDIT: I work with programmers fairly often and have never been stitched up so far. I say upfront that: -Any code produced is ours to do what we like with upon complete payment. -If there is an error in the code that we find later (state time limit...testing period varies depending upon the complexity of the software) the programmer will fix it as part of the original job. -The original job is what we agree to initially. If we forget a bit or want to add features (often happens) then it's an Extra Mission and we will pay extra. -Cash upon delivery. If it's a large job then you should split the job up into milestones; with something you can look at at each stage. ...by laying out your expectations in advance, you save yourself brain damage later on. The Extra Missions bit shows fairness on your part and people respond to that; not least because mission creep occurs in 99 out of 100 cases in my experience. If the software is for resale then you should tell the programmer (you need to know that the programmer is OK with that; you need a higher quality of code and more security if the software is going to meet a million monkeys trying to break it; and you should get the programmer to sign something promising not to rebadge and spin off competing software). You should also really REALLY work on the job specs. Write out what you want to happen; then think about it for a few days (including from the POV of a customer using the software), refine, add bits, take away bits until you have it as right as it's going to get before submitting the job up for tender. Contractors as a whole aren't big fans of ambiguity; but that goes double for programmers, it would seem. Hope that helps.
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