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Clients, do you read all proposals ? Do you see all of them ?

blancanieve
Ace Contributor
Nadine D Member Since: Jan 23, 2016
11 of 27

I hire only occasionally. It depends heavily on the typ of job and the amount of proposals. Usually I award a job within 24 hours.

 

For example, I once posted a tiny text entry job with a quick turnaround required. I didn't read all proposals, because there were just too many, and went with one of first ones (a new freelancer). 

 

But when I want to hire a translator and my favorite freelancer is not available, I read most of the proposals. I weed out the ones that do not follow the instructions given in the posting (especially if I want the proposal to be in German and someone sends it in English, I decline that person immediately). Then I discard those who sent a proposal full of spelling and grammar mistakes. From my experience, the quality of the proposal is a much better indicator for the quality of a translation than the exact JSS score, which is why I do not automatically exclude new freelancers, as long as they are able to write a proposal in decent German. For some translations I look up former work performed by a freelancer, for example when they got hired for a website translation and the job is public, I am able to check the translated website via their work history. 

yurynmuz
Community Leader
Yury M Member Since: Jun 16, 2017
12 of 27

Cheers Nadine for useful info.

 

So, you usually read the very first proposals only if they are not for translating job.

 

Have a good day

blancanieve
Ace Contributor
Nadine D Member Since: Jan 23, 2016
13 of 27

Yury,

 

when I post a job that doesn't require any qualifications (like a simple data entry job) I get about 50 proposals within the first 30 minutes. It is just not doable to read them all. So I hire one of the first ones whose quote is within my budget.

 

As a general rule, the more qualifications a job requires, the less proposals I get and naturally, the more time I dedicate to choosing the right person.

yurynmuz
Community Leader
Yury M Member Since: Jun 16, 2017
14 of 27

Nadine, your replies are helpful - I can look now on things from clients/buyers points.

 

Just one more question please.

 

Do you see the proposals from those who do not meet some preferred qualifications? (maybe they are hidden etc.)

 

Thank you very much

blancanieve
Ace Contributor
Nadine D Member Since: Jan 23, 2016
15 of 27

Yes, I can see them, they are not hidden. By default they are sorted by Best Match, but those "Best Matches" are chosen by Upwork and it is not clear at all to me why they would be a better match for the job than others. So this preselection doesn't have an impact on my hiring decision.

yurynmuz
Community Leader
Yury M Member Since: Jun 16, 2017
16 of 27

Cheers Nadine again. They are not hidden - very good.

 

Smiley Happy

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
17 of 27

@Yury M wrote:

Please tell, it's interesting. Do you open all of them dispite of some filters (maybe - I'm not sure what you see there) ?

 

This question is only to clients - buyers.

 

Simply as I read many times you recieve tons of proposals and it's not easy to read them all. Do you go to the bottom ?

 

Please tell your own, personal way of dealing with these situations.

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 


 I've taken to inviting specific FLs to a job rather than a mass job posting. 

 

As to reading all of the proposals when I've posted a public job, it depends...

 

Did I receive 5-10 proposals or 50+?

 

On the lower end of the proposal number, I'll review the profiles. On the upper end...no. That's when my "feature selection" kicks in.

yurynmuz
Community Leader
Yury M Member Since: Jun 16, 2017
18 of 27

Cheers Kat

 

Your info is also very useful

 

Have a good day

richard_wein
Community Guru
Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
19 of 27

Hi. As a new freelancer here, I'm wondering how to maximise the chances that my proposals will actually be read. I've been spending an hour or more carefully writing each of my proposals, and if my proposal's read I think I'll have a respectable chance of getting a job.

 

I understand that the proposal list seen by clients shows the first line of the proposal's text. So I've started trying to fit something attention-grabbing into that line. In my last proposal I wrote: "Hello, I've just completed a job very similar to yours.", which was true. (But obviously the job wasn't done via Upwork.)

 

What concerns me a bit is that this makes my proposals seem rather peremptory, getting straight down to business without the usual niceties. I'd be interested to hear what clients think about this, and what effective one-liners they've seen that have tempted them to read a proposal.

 

Actually, I know that at least one (out of about 7) of my proposals has been read, because I received a positive response from one client, even though he chose not to hire me on that occasion. But I suspect that most haven't even been read.

 

Richard.

cupidmedia
Community Guru
Jennifer D Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
20 of 27

Yury: like other clients have said, "it depends". I usually will at least skim most proposals. I have a few ways to immediately weed out spam/junk proposals, and I don't bother reading them. I don't rule out proposals with no JSS regardless of how many proposals I received, because I enjoy working with new freelancers (like Rene said, they often go the extra mile). If I'm pressed for time, I might rule out proposals with very low JSS (below 80%), otherwise I'll usually look at even those and try to figure out why their JSS might be suffering.

 

No proposals are hidden, but there is a "show more" accordion after the "recommended" ones that are recommended by Upwork's algorithm.

 

Richard: correct, only the first couple of lines of your proposal show in the proposal list. So it's important to grab the client in those couple of lines. You definitely don't want to waste that space with "Dear Hiring Manager, my name is Richard and I live in blah blah.....".

 

If I have a very long list of proposals, then those which address me by name will catch my eye, because it shows the freelancer has looked at my feedback history. But other clients report this as a turn-off, so I guess you may want to experiment with that. Otherwise just "Hello" is perfectly fine, I think. Your approach is pretty good, but you could maybe reframe it to be client-centric instead of focused on you. E.g. "Your job to do X will be straightfoward for me because this is a problem I've solved for many clients previously" or something like that. Tell the client what you can do to solve their problem, not why you personally are so great.

 

Make sure your proposal addresses key points in the job post and points to *relevant* experience. Don't blah blah about your experience making blog websites when the customer wants an ecommerce website, or something.

 

(Also, it *probably* doesn't make a difference to your hire rate but it amused me: when I view your profile, the show more link cuts off your geocoding bullet to say "Acquiring latitude/longitude from addresses, using the Google". I actually thought that was the complete bullet, until I clicked "more" and saw you really say "...using the Google geocoding API.". So maybe a slight rearranging of your bullet list might help.)