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Clients vs Freelancers

lindseyhgregory
Community Leader
Lindsey G Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
11 of 19

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davidd1008
Community Leader
David D Member Since: Jun 8, 2016
12 of 19

I think if we're being honest and open about the cheap vs. pricey rates we can safely say a few things:

 

1. It's no one's business what a freelancer decides to charge. If they are happy/comfortable charging $2 USD an hour then they're completely free to do so. Who am I to judge?

 

2. We all know that many clients want a deal. And that's fine too. Who doesn't?

 

However, you do get what you pay for and there should be a reasonable expectation on both sides of what you're getting for $2/hour. 

 

I respect and understand that the cost of living varies from country to country and that can impact a freelancer's rates quite a bit. However, professional rates are still professional rates. There are highly skilled freelancers on this platform who live in India or the Philippines or wherever and still command a professional rate for their work. It may be slightly less than their American or European counterparts but it's still a professional rate. 

 

I have been on this (and other) platforms long enough to know that very few talented professionals charge $2/hour. Regardless of where they live. 

 

Someone said it best in another thread. I can't remember who it was but I'd love to give them credit. When you are submitting proposals with low rates you are trying to compete based on price and not talent.

 

And clients should be well aware of that. And they should also have reasonable expectations of the quality of the freelancer and the quality of the work at such a low rate. I don't want to disparage my freelancing brothers and sisters because I know there are many "low cost" freelancers on here who do good work but they are more the exception than the rule. 

 

Easily 90% of the griping and complaining I see on these forums by clients are with low-cost freelancers who aren't delivering what they promised or who are producing low quality work. 

 

You get what you pay for.

 

The sad part is that while this list is good, I'm sure that most clients and freelancers who take the time to register on the forums and participate in the community are not the primary offenders. 

 

cupidmedia
Community Guru
Jennifer D Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
13 of 19

@David D wrote:

 

[...]

 

The sad part is that while this list is good, I'm sure that most clients and freelancers who take the time to register on the forums and participate in the community are not the primary offenders. 

 


 This. Sure there are people who could benefit from the list who are also on the forum, but I don't think many of them will read a thread like this.

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
14 of 19

Richard, can you hear my applause?  Your post was accurate from start to finish ... with #4 being my greatest peeve. If one line ever keeps me from reading further - this is it!

 

"I’ll supply more details to the freelancer chosen” – Let me make this blunt. When I see that… my first thought is you don’t care about your own project enough to give me details in your little job postings. So why should I care about your little posting? Seriously, this might make sense if you wanted me to redraw the blueprints for a B-2 bomber… but your brochure or flyer isn’t classified."

 

Well done!

davidd1008
Community Leader
David D Member Since: Jun 8, 2016
15 of 19

Another pet peeve, since we're sharing so openly. And this will apply mostly to my writing brothers and sisters on here but also the web design and developers.

 

SEO.

 

Now I'm sure many clients know what SEO is and how it's done. But many also do not. And I have to assume that the ones who don't (and think they do) have read a few books or listened to a few podcasts or read a few internet articles and now think they know what's what. 

 

So here it is. SEO is a long-term strategy that is made up of many, many components. One of which, yes, is your blog articles and web copy and having them well-written and formatted. But there is a lot more to it than that.

 

SEO is not something you do like flipping a switch or adding an image to a website. If it was that easy, everyone would be doing it already. It's a long-term strategy that entails writing good content, sharing good content, getting quality backlinks from authoritative sites, etc. And that's just on the writing side of things. Your website coding plays a big role too!

 

And please, don't look at the Yoast guidelines and think that blogs, articles, or white papers that aren't all written in 2-3 sentence paragraphs with less than 20% "passive voice" and 1.5% keyword density are useless. Yoast (and other plugins or guides) is a guideline, not an "according to Hoyle" rule. Yes, they have good thoughts, yes they have good practices, and yes it's helpful to work that way. But you know what's more helpful? 

 

Good content that people want to read. 

 

And having THAT on your site is better than any "SEO optimized" fluff piece. 

 

SEO is a long-term strategy and as such, it takes some time to see results. And writing blogs and articles and effective web copy is all part of the strategy that includes many other parts. It's not just about working the phrase "best frozen yogurt in Chicago" into a 500-word blog 6 times. 

 

Blogs, articles, white papers, etc. These are all good things to have on your website and it's what I (and others) get paid to do and happily so! But you should have realistic expectations of the effectiveness of them. They will eventually help you show up in searches better, but if you're not sharing your content on social media, in your email marketing, trying to guest post on other blogs or sites and get links from them, writing press releases, releasing press releases, and 10 other things..... 

 

You're not doing SEO properly.

 

And having 10 articles about frozen yogurt on your blog is about as likely to drive traffic to your frozen yogurt website as standing on the street corner yelling the URL at people who walk by. 

 

Content that sits on a stagnant website with poor traffic will only sit on your stagnant website with poor traffic. Yes, it may get you a few extra hits here and there if you're lucky. But by and large, it won't do much if you don't do anything with it. 

 

SEO is a tool. Your blog is a tool. And like any other tool it needs to be used properly or it sits in the toolbox being neglected. 

 

Okay, I'm hopping down off the soap box now. 

anima9
Community Guru
Robert James R Member Since: Apr 17, 2015
16 of 19

@David D wrote:

Another pet peeve, since we're sharing so openly. And this will apply mostly to my writing brothers and sisters on here but also the web design and developers.

 

SEO.

 

 



 Like you, I'm also a staunch promoter of writing for people and not search engines. Each time a client asks me to "improve SEO" I say yes but I also tell them the SEO they want me to do may not be the SEO Google wants (sorry Yahoo! and Bing).

 

If they insist, I do it knowing I tried NOT to to contribute to the whole SEO mess.

davidd1008
Community Leader
David D Member Since: Jun 8, 2016
17 of 19

To clarify, I'm not suggesting "writing for SEO" is useless. It isn't. And I'm not suggesting Yoast isn't a good plugin. It is.

 

But there is such a thing as over optimizing. And if Google hasn't yet figured out how to tell if something is being over optimized for SEO purposes, they soon will. And while formatting short paragraphs, using bullet points, bucket brigades, etc are all good things and good tactics, there has to be a certain amount of understanding that none of these are magic bullet quick fixes. 

 

If your paragraph goes over by a few words or your keyword density drops below 1.5%....it's not the end of the world. By and large, Google doesn't care. 

 

Relevant, well-written content is what the goal should be. Search engines will change their algorithms but connecting people with useful content that answers their query will never be fazed out. 

sam-sly
Community Guru
Samantha S Member Since: Jun 23, 2016
18 of 19

@David D wrote:

To clarify, I'm not suggesting "writing for SEO" is useless. It isn't. And I'm not suggesting Yoast isn't a good plugin. It is.

 

But there is such a thing as over optimizing. And if Google hasn't yet figured out how to tell if something is being over optimized for SEO purposes, they soon will. And while formatting short paragraphs, using bullet points, bucket brigades, etc are all good things and good tactics, there has to be a certain amount of understanding that none of these are magic bullet quick fixes. 

-------------

 

Yes! I agree. I use Yoast and I write with SEO in mind. But some of the things requested or done in the name of "SEO" really make me cringe. I think some clients forget why they actually want to optimize their site for search engines. They forget that it is to make it easy for their ideal potential ideal customer to find them online.

 

Yes, it helps to structure the website and the post/page so Google and Bing bots can correctly categorize it. It also helps to make the page easy for humans to skim or read. And it helps if the site loads quickly and is easy to use. But most of all, there needs to be useful content that actually addresses the customer's questions. A potential customer referred by Google is looking for an answer to a question or for specific information. They are more likely to become actual customers if they find the page useful. Some of the content created just for SEO is not going to do much to actually attract a potential customer. 

lindseyhgregory
Community Leader
Lindsey G Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
19 of 19

I got a little misty reading that

 

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