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Don't like the initial work - can I cancel fixed price contract?

Active Member
Karli S Member Since: Jun 3, 2016
1 of 6

I'm sure these questions have been asked before but I can't find them in the threads.  

 

  1. If I describe the product (graphic) I am looking for, and the initial attempts or products that they send back are not good or what I want, can I cancel the contract without ever getting to a final product?  If I do that, how much of the fixed price do I have to pay?
  2. Based on the initial work, I know I don't want to continue working with a freelancer, so what are my options?

Thanks anyone who can help or point me to a thread that already exists answering this! 

Community Guru
Maria A Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
2 of 6
You can discuss it with the freelancer and agree o a price for the work that was done. If you do agree, then I would end the contract and communicate that you won't be moving forward with your work together. It might get tricky if the freelancer wants the money in full which is why small milestones are important. Good luck!
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
3 of 6

I agree that you should discuss it with the freelancer.

 

When I hire someone creative, where "subjective" elements such as personal taste come into it, I always suggest to the shortlisted candidates that I will hire 2 or three to provide me with an initial, rough design idea based on my brief at price X, and tell them that I will make the final decision for going ahead with the actual end product for $ X based on that.

 

I pay a fair price for that initial work as it represents the main part.

 

The freelancers - even those I don't choose for the final logo / graphic / whatever, should be fairly compensated for their work, their time is not free and if I have chosen wisely the final decision just comes down to whose work I find subjectively more appealing, and is not a real reflection on the skills of the others. I just "liked" one more.

Community Guru
Maria A Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
4 of 6
Completely agree with Petra. And, as a graphic designer myself, I think it's also important to provide at least 2 samples if possible to see which direction the clients wants to go in.
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
5 of 6

Whenever a contractor accepts a fixed-price contract, they are told that complete payment is not guaranteed, and they are told that the amount paid is up to the client. There is a notice that they must agree to every time.

 

This doesn't mean that clients should abuse the system. But clearly your intention is to be fair.

 

The ability to change the amount paid to something different from the original agreed-upon amount is built into the system. It is intended to be used in conjunction with discussion with the contractor.

 

If I am your contractor and you let me know that although you like and appreciate my work, it's just not right for your project, and you'd like to pay me $X now for my efforts, but not have me work any more on this, then I would be grateful and readily accept.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
6 of 6

@Preston wrote:

Whenever a contractor accepts a fixed-price contract, they are told that complete payment is not guaranteed, and they are told that the amount paid is up to the client. There is a notice that they must agree to every time.


 Is it possible that you have not looked at the notice since before Escrow came in? That was what it said before Escrow. It is NOT as simple as all that these days, by a long shot! It also says no such thing these days, at all.

 

Whatever was funded (the whole amount here by the sound of it) is "safe" unless the freelancer agrees to a lesser amount OR dispute and / or arbitration (arbitration costing just under $ 300 for all parties, each) agree to a lesser amount.

 

It is dangerously misleading to tell a client that the amount they pay is up to them, and it is also entirely untrue. It has not been like that for a very long time.

 


@Preston wrote:

If I am your contractor and you let me know that although you like and appreciate my work, it's just not right for your project, and you'd like to pay me $X now for my efforts, but not have me work any more on this, then I would be grateful and readily accept.


 THAT I completely agree with, and it's the most sensible approach to bring this to a conclusion!

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