Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

First time user seeking advice on dealing with bad situation

Active Member
Chris M Member Since: Nov 24, 2015
1 of 9

Here's in a nut shell- I was quoted 10-15 hours for a job (which is what I got approval for). I saw that the freelancer set up a 15hr limit, I did not, however, notice it was set up as a 15hr limit PER WEEK (ok fine, shame on me). After receiving the second week's bill I asked him what was going on and he said he'd look into it. We went back and forth and he was actually very communicative and work on my project was progressing. I then got a bill for a 3rd week (which I happen to know he was on vacation so he claims) at which point I dug deeper and realized all this and promptly suspended the contract (and yes, shame on me again for not doing so sooner - doesn't make it right for him to abuse it).

 

So now I've been charged 45 hours for a job he quoted at 15 and to top it all off, it's not complete asnd now he's vanished. I contacted Upwork about a dispute but was told it couldn't be done since we are more than a week out.

 

How should I proceed? If I'm getting screwed out of $500, I'd at least like to be able to give a bad review to warn other people about this freelancer.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
BEST ANSWER
2 of 9

@Chris M wrote:

Here's in a nut shell- I was quoted 10-15 hours for a job (which is what I got approval for). I saw that the freelancer set up a 15hr limit, I did not, however, notice it was set up as a 15hr limit PER WEEK


 The freelancer did no such thing, you did, when setting up the offer. The freelancer has no control over the weekly limit...

 

You can and should end the contract and leave appropriate feedback when doing so.

Active Member
Chris M Member Since: Nov 24, 2015
3 of 9

Thanks Petra. I guess I screwed up more than I thought. Still not right for him to expoit it like that. There was an opportunity for him to do the right thing as the professional and he didn't. So while I will take the blame & responsibilty for my mistakes, I feel obligated to leave negative feedback. It's just unfortunate.

 

Thanky you.

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
4 of 9

@Chris M wrote:

Thanks Petra. I guess I screwed up more than I thought. Still not right for him to expoit it like that. There was an opportunity for him to do the right thing as the professional and he didn't. So while I will take the blame & responsibilty for my mistakes, I feel obligated to leave negative feedback. It's just unfortunate.


 Chris, you were exploited and there's no excuse for it and the freelancer who did this is no professional and needs to be exposed as a crook through your feedback. You might also consider filing a dispute with Customer Service. For freelancers, that usually results in a negative outcome, but you being the client maybe you'll get some satisfaction from it. But I've never been a client or in your position so take my suggestion with a grain of salt.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Active Member
Chris M Member Since: Nov 24, 2015
5 of 9

Yeah, thanks John. I did try to file a dispute but was declined as it was more than a week out from the payment - or something like that. They were going to try to contact the freelancer, but made no promises. I guess the best they can offer is if he suddenly decides to do the right thing, but I'm not holding my breath.

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
6 of 9

An honest, truly professional contractor is able to provide a client with a quote, even when using an hourly contract.

 

"Looking over the project description, I believe this will take me about 15 hours to complete."

 

But Upwork has no interface elements that enforce any kind of quote like that. It is left to the contractor and the client to manage this type of estimate.

 

I high-quality contractor would simply have finished the project in about 15 hours, because they know how to estimate project completion time accurately.

 

A slighly less high-quality contractor or a contractor working on a complex project would have communicated clearly with you when she realized that she would not be able to complete the project in 15 hours. She would have explained why and given a good estimate of how much longer it would take.

 

If the project was understood in sufficient detail beforehand, and a contractor took 45 hours for something that was estimated to take 15 hours, then this isn't the kind of contractor I would want to be, or want to work with as a client.

 

But that doesn't mean there is any kind of remedy from Upwork. For future contracts, monitor work more closely when working with new, unfamiliar contractors.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
7 of 9

Chris, please don't think I was blaming you. Absolutely not. You made some errors, but with a genuine and responsible freelancer those trusting errors would not have cost you like this! Of course your next freelancer will pay the price because you'll now be weary.... It's a real shame!

 

Preston summed it up very well! Especially the bit about once a decent freelancer realizes that something might take a little longer than anticipated they would come to you and say "Look, Chris, because of X, Y and Z this will take a bit more time than we had originally anticipated, because you now want X and we agreed to do Y, so I'll blogging an extra 5 hours, if that's OK with you?

 

PLEASE do not think this is the norm here. The vast majority of freelancers take pride in their work and enjoy working with new clients, taking particular care to make sure their first experience is a great one.

 

Another thing to bear in mind is the hourly rate you paid.

 

You appear to have paid somewhere in the region of 10 an hour.

 

Chances are had you hired a higher level freelancer it would have been done in a fraction of the time, and most importantly: It would have been DONE.

Active Member
Chris M Member Since: Nov 24, 2015
8 of 9

Thank you Petra. I don't take it that way. I mean, I've plenty of the blame to share. I should have paid more attention and done a bit more due diligence.

 

When the second charge hit, I honestly thought I was mistakenly being charged twice for the same thing. That's when the developer and I began discussing looking into and remedying it. I let that drag on too long and was too trusting.

 

As for the paying a lower rate. To be honest- I put this job up for grabs and the only responses I got were from $10/hr - $17/hr range developers. This may sound ignorant, but most were based internationally and I don't know how the dollar converts, so for all I knew that was a decent rate as there were so many in that range. And perhaps higher rate developers saw the job as not worth their time. I don't know. So many ifs.

 

At any rate, I closed the job and gave a bad review, so hopefully no one will be hiring him any time soon. Though I think it's moot as I no longer see him on here.

 

 

Community Leader
Charlie E Member Since: Aug 2, 2015
9 of 9

Petra,

 

I have to strongly disagree with your statement that a freelancer with a higher rate is less likely to be dishonest. 

 

I think this is a big put-down to all of those hard working freelancers in developing coutries where $10/hour provides a good quality of living. 

 

Any semi-competent business person will tell you that throwing money at a problem does not solve the problem. 

 

On our first Upwork contract we were billed by a dishonest freelancer who was on $35/hour. They billed 8 hours for a design they ripped off the internet. Upwork decided in our favor pretty quickly (thanks Upwork).

 

To the OP, here is my humble advice. We have hired around 10 freelaners in the past month on Upwork. 

 

  1. Agree in advance with the freelancer how many hours the project will take after they have all of the specifications. 
  2. Set the limit on the number of hours that a freelancer can bill to what was agreed.
  3. Make all new freelancers use the Work Diary until they have been working with you for a while. 
  4. Go into each freelancers work diary and set a limit on the number of hours at the start of every week.
  5. If you don't expect your freelancer to work that particular week, set the limit to 0. Alternatively, you can pause the contract once work is complete. 

 

 

TOP KUDOED MEMBERS