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Is it safe to hire a logo designer?

lomen_jan
Community Guru
Jan L Member Since: Jul 5, 2015
11 of 19

@Preston H wrote:

For the record, it can be easier to crack open a logo program, including web-based ones, and crank out a bunch of automatically generated logos, than it is to copy an existing logo from a company and convert that existing logo to the proper vector formats with the new company name.

 

I think getting poorly made or uninspired logos is far more likely than getting copied logos.


Advice "I lost count"

Go for the designer that features a bit of logo crafting process in portfolio. 

 

Also, we designers are issuing fetwa on "logo programs" and logo knock-offs (unless they are for entertainment purpose)

brianajross
Community Leader
Briana R Member Since: Jul 8, 2015
12 of 19

Everything Jan said (although I prefer to work on a flat rate basis so I don't feel rushed to deliver something within the client's budget. Some logo ideas come easily to me, others don't, but I don't like punishing the client (or myself) just because I'm having an uncreative day. I just can't work like that. Last night I worked on logo concepts for a client and spent three hours sketching at a bar, but I would have felt a little weird billing by the hour for it so I'm grateful he's paying me a flat rate. I much, much prefer the flat rate.)

 

When it comes to logos, you truly get what you pay for. The less you pay, the higher the chances that it was copied from somewhere. Also, not every graphic designer can design logos well. You want someone who will spend time learning about your company, your market position, who the target audience is, etc. You don't want someone who just cranks out the first idea that pops into their head either. It takes work. 

 

Like others have said, you can do an image search on the internet to see if your logo's been used anywhere else. At the end of the day you own it, so you're responsible for it, but an honest logo designer doesn't want to be dragged into a lawsuit either.

lomen_jan
Community Guru
Jan L Member Since: Jul 5, 2015
13 of 19

@Briana R wrote:

Last night I worked on logo concepts for a client and spent three hours sketching at a bar, but I would have felt a little weird billing by the hour for it so I'm grateful he's paying me a flat rate. I much, much prefer the flat rate.)

 

 


I am glad that you generally agree with me, but I don't feel weird charging my clients time I spent on their task. Hourly billing helps me charge hours spent on changing colours and other clients "let me see how it looks if" requests. Skillful designer can make one high quality logo in a week.  It would be fine if clients could settle for only one logo - then the fixed price makes sense, but knowing clients - they like to have options, so hourly billing is the only way to make both sides happy. 

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
14 of 19

I understand the appeal of and advantages of a fixed-price contract for logo design.

 

But using an hourly contract, as Jan suggests, essentially allows the client unlimited freedom to try out different things and ask for changes.

 

I think the level of service and quality that can be offered using an hourly contract makes this the more appealing contract model for any type of work that is creative or open-ended.

mtngigi
Community Guru
Virginia F Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
15 of 19

The level of service and quality is never compromised on my fixed price contracts. Clients get unlimited revisions until they're satisfied, which is always. Doing logos can sometimes take weeks and weeks,, and sometimes one happens very quickly - it all evens out in the end.

 

In my opinion, it is never in the client's best interest to pay hourly for most design projects, and especially logos, unless of course you find a freelancer who is charging 0.1¢ an hour.

 

 

lomen_jan
Community Guru
Jan L Member Since: Jul 5, 2015
16 of 19

@Virginia F wrote:

 

The level of service and quality is never compromised on my fixed price contracts. Clients get unlimited revisions until they're satisfied, which is always. Doing logos can sometimes take weeks and weeks,, and sometimes one happens very quickly - it all evens out in the end.

 

In my opinion, it is never in the client's best interest to pay hourly for most design projects, and especially logos, unless of course you find a freelancer who is charging 0.1¢ an hour.

 


 

 

Well, you can run your business as you wish, but honestly, hourly pricing really protects you from ad nauseam revisions. At the end it is all based on a brief - if you get nicely written brief - you end up with just minor tweaks. 

 

The real fear here is if you hire a designer that will deliver gimmicky logo - something that looks so now, but it will end up being outdated in 5 years. Gimmicky and trendy logos are good for pop-ups and one time only events, but It is not a good choice for the companies that want to last longer. I always deliver high-end logos even for modest clients, but main focus is on durability and memorability. 

 

And FYI, muses have nothing to do with it. It is more intellectual visual coding than art. If you are feeling uninspired - do some research - and CHARGE IT. 

ccaringpro
Active Member
Ms Joy c Member Since: Sep 15, 2007
17 of 19

 As an inventor, I agree wi the legal liability posted here. Who wants to get a cease & desist after spending 3 yrs building your brand? The issue of creativity. A friend started a writer's group. I've written & published some books. The writer's group allots time for writing on a given subject during group time. I quit, never to return. Discussed it later wi another publishedf author. She said that she is a self disciplined writer who decides on certain times, then writes., I write as the muse pops in. This includes pulling off the freeway, middle of the night, seldom in the morning etc,. We have different styles of when we can be creative. So in observing this discussion, I would say, you have to charge according to your style of times of creativity. The discussion gives me insight into how to hire. I hope added value for you. Your discussion is valuable to me. Thank you

claudiacezy
Community Guru
Claudia Z Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
18 of 19

I see that many are bringing to discussion the cost as being a decisive factor whether you will get something original or not. While it's true that an experienced, reputable provider will charge higher, it's not a quarantee that the final produced work is fully original or that it won't be replicated by someone else in the future.


Is 109,000.00 euro a decent pay for an original logo or it still leaves place for plagiarism? The logo cost represented 96K euro for the concept and design + 13K euro for logo testing.


You never know, Upwork freelancer or not.


A hourly contract may be indicated because you can have/ask all rights for the elements produced, files, sketches....

 

If you are going with a fixed price contract, agree with the freelancer from the beginning to have all files sent. I see, including in the forum, designers being reticent to do so, and often it is because they are using copyrighted material or want to retain some rights, specifically for projects started under fixed price contract.

brianajross
Community Leader
Briana R Member Since: Jul 8, 2015
19 of 19

@Claudia Z wrote:

I see that many are bringing to discussion the cost as being a decisive factor whether you will get something original or not. While it's true that an experienced, reputable provider will charge higher, it's not a quarantee that the final produced work is fully original or that it won't be replicated by someone else in the future.

 


Whether it's replicated by someone else is beyond anyone's control. If that happens, that's when the client gets to have their lawyer send a C&D. 

 

I agree with your comment about pricing too even though I was one of the commenters who mentioned higher prices = better quality. As with all things in life, there are exceptions.

 

Fun story: the former employer I worked in-house for paid a design firm $20,000 for a logo that included about two dozen spot colors, most of them in gradients. It did weird stuff to PDFs. It was a nightmare to send to print. The file itself was huge. I can't imagine what printers thought when they got it. Obviously it didn't look good in black and white or at small scale.

 

They got the logo before I was hired, but the creative director who was there when it happened said his advice was ignored by upper management. Maybe they thought they were paying by the color, lol. Whenever the other designers and I saw upper management doing something stupid, we would go back to the incident of the $20K logo that had more spot colors than a dalmation as proof how naive they were and how they undervalued their own emplyees.

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