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Job Naming Conventions

bfcd0d30
Active Member
Daniel D Member Since: Mar 30, 2016
1 of 3

I would like to ask client companies that use Upwork about best practices around Job naming.

 

We employ freelancers for custom development projects for our own clients.  I would like to include the end client name in the Job Name, but I do not want to expose the client name to the community.   One of the support staff suggested keeping the Job Name generic, but adding the details like Client Name to the Description, but that has a similar problem.

 

I would like to hear how others readily manage their jobs, but also shield proprietary info like Client Names from their Job Postings.

 

Thank you

katevillanueva
Ace Contributor
Katherine V Member Since: Dec 30, 2015
2 of 3

You could try assigning two or three-letter codes for each client, codes that will only be internally used by your company. For example, if you hire a mobile developer who will be working on a project for a client calleed "The Fake Company" you could assign the code FK or TFC to the company and name the job "[TFC] Mobile Developer" or something similar.

 

Regarding job postings you could just put a general description of the client company such as, "a New York Stock Exchange-listed company whose head office is located in Atlanta," or "a start-up technology firm based in Silicon Valley, California." It gives people a general idea of what type of client they will be working on without revealing the name of the client.

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
3 of 3

Katherine wrote "..put a general description of the client company such as, "a New York Stock Exchange-listed company whose head office is located in Atlanta," or "a start-up technology firm based in Silicon Valley, California." It gives people a general idea of what type of client they will be working on without revealing the name of the client."

 

This is the best way to go from a freelance professional's point of view.  Many of the more experienced providers will not bid on a RFP without having a resonably solid idea of what a project is about.

 

Example: A RFP asking for web content for a 'new and exciting site" tells us nada and will often be ignored.  A RFP asking for 'content for an accounting company" gives at least enough knowledge for people to respond with appropriate examples of work done.

 
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