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New Freelancer taking his time starting the job

2e1278d9
Active Member
Ben A Member Since: Apr 18, 2018
1 of 16

Hi all,

 

I'm just after some advice from your side of things.

 

How long after a job offer is accepted and all materials provided would you expect to start the job? This is providing you haven't specified any delays your end.

 

Would it be unreasonable for a client to cancel a contract if, after 2 weeks have passed, no work has been done, considering it  was meant to be 'asap'?

 

This is bearing in mind a few messages have gone back and forth, and a number of excuses have been given. Though also with relatively large periods of silence.

 

Thanks for reading!

holymell
Community Guru
Melissa C Member Since: Jul 22, 2017
2 of 16
I would suggest you tell your freelancer that you need the job done quickly, so you're going to cancel the contract and find a new one.

In my field, I've had people wait a few weeks for me to start work, but I always tell them before an offer is even made that it will be a few weeks. What your freelancer is doing is just ridiculous and disrespectful. I can't fathom ignoring a client. If this is a time sensitive matter, you need to do what is best for your job.

Good luck to you. I'm sure you'll find a more expedient person to work with you on this.

Edit- just realized that I never answered your question. I start whenever I'm able to, but I always let even my potential clients know when that will be. If they need something quickly and I'm able to, I start right away.
rverang
Community Guru
Renante V Member Since: Feb 7, 2018
3 of 16

Is the project fixed-price or hourly?

 

If it is fixed-price, maybe you can ask for screenshots.

 

If you are certain no work has been done yet, after 2 weeks? It would be best to cancel it.

 

Just my 2 cents.

2e1278d9
Active Member
Ben A Member Since: Apr 18, 2018
4 of 16

Thanks for the replies.

 

It's an hourly contract. The freelancer is experienced, has 1,000+ hours billed, 100% success rate, etc.

 

There's probably a reasonable explanation, but if he doesn't offer it, what can I do! Smiley Happy

holymell
Community Guru
Melissa C Member Since: Jul 22, 2017
5 of 16
You seem like a nice client. You deserve an equally decent freelancer. You've given this one more than enough chances. That was kind of you.

You deserve better.

Asking for proof that work has been done if he claims he has done the work is a good idea, though. Perhaps he's busy, or not getting notifications. I've had periods where my notifications haven't worked and I've not been able to reply to a client when I need to. But if you know that he hasn't started yet, you should cut your losses and move on.
rverang
Community Guru
Renante V Member Since: Feb 7, 2018
6 of 16

He must be busy then.

 

The next step is up to you. You can either:

1. Wait for the freelancer's schedule to open up and hope that he finds time to do the project.

2. Find someone else to do the job.

2e1278d9
Active Member
Ben A Member Since: Apr 18, 2018
7 of 16

Thanks Smiley Happy

 

I think I'll set Friday as the deadline and message him to let him know. It could well be that he's busy with other projects, and because of his strong profile I'm prepared to give him the benefit of the doubt.

 

I'm glad you both back up my initial thoughts on this. I appreciate your insight.

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
8 of 16

Ben:

You have been extremely kind and far more patient than is necessary.

 

In the future, if you REALLY want something done ASAP, then hire three separate freelancers to work on the project. Tell them about the deadline.

 

Once you obtain what you need, then close all the contracts. If somebody didn't do any work, then that's fine. They won't get paid.

jmlaidlaw
Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
9 of 16

@ Ben --

 

I do not know of a freelancing category here on Upwork in which "ASAP" would mean, as what we would call a "term of art," "more than two weeks." In my own lines (proofreading, editing, writing, translating), "ASAP" usually means hours (occasionally half-hours!), and never more than two-three days, unless specified as such -- and then only within the context of a large project. (For example, if I were editing a 1,500-page book, two weeks would be "rush," indeed!)

 

The periods of silence are unprofessional and entirely unacceptable!  The existence of excuses sounds very dodgy.

 

That is the short answer to your question. It's up to you to determine whether the freelancer is or is not being candid with you, and whether it is worth it to you to continue working with this freelancer.

2e1278d9
Active Member
Ben A Member Since: Apr 18, 2018
10 of 16

Hi,

 

Thanks for all the responses. I've just received a reply saying that he has a problem with his Mac that will take 2 weeks to repair (!), so can't complete the contract.

 

The thing is, what kind of feedback do I now give?!

 

I had interviewed a few candidates who I thought would be suitable for the job, so it should be fine.

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