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a9a5f418
Community Member

Pressure on the client

Hi all,

 

I thought I had found a really great freelancer for a job I needed to have done. I wanted to communicate more clearly with the person about what I needed, but he just kept say 'send me a copy of the text so I can check it out', without even confirming with me any price for the job. I have decided not to go with this person because I felt like I was being smooth-talked in a way, even though the freelancer seems to have a good reputation on Upwork.

 

Has anyone ever had a similar experience? I'm going with my gut on this one.

 

Thanks!

11 REPLIES 11
f0ec0ca0
Community Member

go with your gut.  If it doesn't feel right, dont do it.  I can tell you, having hired many freelancers, the few that i had a bad feeling about but went with anyway almost always turned out badly.  There are plenty freelancers out there, find one that you connect with.

holymell
Community Member

Hi Tenzin.

I'm an editor. I don't know what kind of work you need done, but I always ask my potential clients if I can see the piece before negotiating price. The reason for this is that some pieces are well-polished and won't require as much of an investment of my time to finish. I charge much less for those.

Then, there are the pieces which are horribly written, formatted improperly, words used in the wrong context improper punctuation and use of italics, ellipses where there needs to be an em-dash; basically, those pieces require a substantive edit, which means a huge investment of my time and a much higher rate.

So that's why I ask to see the piece first. If the author asks me to ignore their content errors, typos, clichéd phrasing, grammar and spelling, I will.

Some jobs, the freelancer needs to see the document before giving a quote. I've not had any issues with this, though I would listen to the needs of the client as well.

Don't know if this helps or not. Just my opinion.

Edit- if you have a bad feeling, yes, it's best to trust your gut. I always listen to my clients. I take notes on what they need. But I will always have to see the piece before I can give an estimate on price. If this freelancer seems too pushy or is outright ignoring your questions, you would be correct in finding someone else.
melaniekhenson
Community Member

I can see this, at least under some circumstances. For instance, I was recently offered a job that was X amount of pages. She did submit the doc ahead of time (I didn't ask...she just sent it without an actual job offer, which was kind of odd) and it was X pages in THE WORLD'S tiniest font, LOL. So effectively...it was easily a third again as many pages when in a font that anyone with human (v., for example, spider) eyes could read. (Or to be less hyperbolic about it...the smallest point size I've seen on standard Word and Word-adjacent programs.)

 

Weird stuff can happen in the world of freelancing. This contractor may have been a hair on the paranoid side and I do believe in going with one's gut but OTOH I don't think it's totally crazy that s/he wanted to see what she was actually  going to be working on before committing to the project.

 

 

Thanks so much for the input - I am glad to have other perspectives so I can see it from his viewpoint as well. I think I also felt like the responses he's given me have dictated how things should go. But I can understand someone wanting to be proactive as well - I know this is a competitive business!

 

Thanks again for the responses.


@Tenzin K wrote:

Thanks so much for the input - I am glad to have other perspectives so I can see it from his viewpoint as well. I think I also felt like the responses he's given me have dictated how things should go. But I can understand someone wanting to be proactive as well - I know this is a competitive business!

 

Thanks again for the responses.


 

This seems reasonable and at the same time, yes, you need to feel you're going to "get along" with your freelancer. You really do want to feel comfortable working with your freelancer.  Little things can mean the project will just be awkward, and who needs that? The right freelancer and relationship will come along for this project. 🙂 Balance logic with gut and you should have a better chance at having the work done to your satisfaction. 

kat303
Community Member


@Tenzin K wrote:

Hi all,

 

I thought I had found a really great freelancer for a job I needed to have done. I wanted to communicate more clearly with the person about what I needed, but he just kept say 'send me a copy of the text so I can check it out', without even confirming with me any price for the job. I have decided not to go with this person because I felt like I was being smooth-talked in a way, even though the freelancer seems to have a good reputation on Upwork.

 

Has anyone ever had a similar experience? I'm going with my gut on this one.

 

Thanks!


 

Although you may have described the job in Perfect detail, down to the last letter, a freelancer still needs to see how that relates to the actual material. I don't know what type of job you had, but in my case I need to see the document/material I would be working with. a document that is just basic straight typing will cost less, but if it contains special formatting, - multi-level outlining, tables, images/graphics that will be affected by what I will be doing and will need to be reformatted correctly will cost more. Also, how many pages does this document have will affect the price.

 

IMO, depending on what type of job a client has, it would be foolish to accept a contract without looking at the actual document. And that is done, along with any more information, details, questions/answers, terms and price are all negotiated and agreed on. - THAT is all done in the interview stage before a client actually awards the contract to a freelancer and before a freelance accepts the contract..

renata101
Community Member

Hello Tenzin,

 

I don't know if this helps but there's no way that someone can reasonably confirm a price for a project without first seeing it. I don't want to be rude, but I can't understand why this would even be an expectation.  Would you ask a builder to confirm a price on a renovation without first seeing the house and getting a clear idea of what you wanted to change? I don't think so. 

I also work as an editor. Many of my clients work with highly complex topic matter. In addition, many of them are not native English speakers. What I need to see is the level of complexity of the document in addition to the writer's command of English. Sometimes I work with people who have lengthy proofs in their papers that don't need a lot of editing, so I factor this into my bid because these sections won't take as long to edit. On longer documents, I often do a short test edit on various sections of the document in order to be able to estimate the time it would take to do the entire document.  So there's a lot more going on with an estimate than I think you're considering.

I struggle daily with the fact that clients seem to think I can work out a budget based on a page count, yet a page count often tells me relatively little about the document. The amount of text can vary widely depending on factors such as whether the document contains a lot of  illustrations.  

I don't know the details of your situation, but it almost seems like the information you are using to say that the freelancer is not trustworthy may actually indicate that the person may be trying to give you an honest estimate of the time it will take to complete your project.  I'm not sure why you would be resistant to provide a copy of your document for the freelancer to review.  I'm a little confused about  why providing more information about your project would be seen as "pressure on the client."  It's natural to need to see the document before agreeing to a budget for the work. We need  to be able to understand the work you're asking for. 

gerrys
Community Member

I see nothing wrong with "asking to review the current material" before ... a meeting? bid? what? (you did not specify).

 

I have waited for months for "specs". Well, not really. Same case as yours; never got off the ground because the "promised" specs were never delivered even though the customer approached me first ... twice.

Tenzin, most of my U. jobs are writing websites for clients and there are certain things I need to know:

- What content (product/service, etc.) are.

- Website layout, pages, etc.

- Targeted audience - I can and do research > but having an open fact based discussion about client demos helps the client.

 

Too many buyers just say "I have a B2B or B2C website."  For all intents and purposes - that is a worthless description because it isn't adequate.

 

A lot of the time, the better the freelancer > the more questions they ask.

tlsanders
Community Member

I don't know what type of work you were looking for, but if it had anything to do with editing, ghostwriting, translation, etc. it would be impossible for a professional freelancer to quote you an accurate price without getting a look at at least a portion of the text.

 

The time investment required depends largely on the quality and nature of the existing text.

Tiffany and Wendy are absolutely correct. I do some editing and ghostwriting, in addition to management consulting. I must see the text before editing, and get answers to a dozen questions or more before ghostwriting. I also translate documents from/to four or five Western European languages, but only for existing clients and only for free. Were I to charge, I would have to see the document before offering a price.

 

I am also a client. I favor freelancers who ask questions. As Wendy said, they are usually the better freelancers.

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