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Re: Ratings go from 1 to 5

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Active Member
João P Member Since: Dec 11, 2013
1 of 18

I've been a client for a long time and I clearly see that the freelancers' ratings sometimes are clearly unfarily upgraded.

 

Dear clients, try never to forget that ratings go from 1 to 5 so it means a 4 or even a 3 is not negative (if I still know how to do math).

 

Every time I give less than 5.0, freelancers come afterwards complaining about the "negative" evaluation and because sometimes people need to rehire them or because people try to avoid troubles, clients feel "forced" to unfarily upgrade evaluation.

 

Be fair! We need fairness and truthfulness and not piety.

 

If everyone gives 5, how can we then distinguish a really true good freelancer?

 

Thank you

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Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
BEST ANSWER
2 of 18

It's the fact that ratings are usually so inflated, that cause concern for freelancers who aren't rated highly. If everyone was rated fairly, then it's likely nobody would be that concerned, after all... a 4 is considerably above average, and could be considered good or very good. 5 should mean perfect, and it's unlikely that everyone is perfect. I'm not!

 

I think a lot of clients doesn't want to rock the boat, encounter confrontation or jeopardize the relationship moving forward... that's why there are so many five star ratings. I've done it myself, if I fee they were a four then I feel I may as well round it up. I only do that because most other people do as well. That doesn't help anybody in the long run, but it's the culture we're dealing with.

 

I think it's one of the main reasons private feedback was introduced, as if it;s completely anonymous then it;s more likely to be honest. I mean, the answer to "do you like my new shirt?" is sometimes going to be very different than the answer to "do you like that guy's new shirt?"

 

Either way, I'd never confront a client about a 'low' rating. Unless it was my finest piece of work, the client was gushing over it and then they left me a 2 or something.  

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)

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Active Member
João P Member Since: Dec 11, 2013
3 of 18

Exactly as you said. Evaluations are clearly inflated, considering that the scale goes from 1 to 5. 

 

I suppose a private feedback must be really taken into force more clearly for the sake of the system.

 

Normally there are projects that last for a long period, and sometimes it's psychologically hard to give less "positive" feedbacks to people that we nicely dealt with. On the other hand, I also understand the freelancers need to know what they did less good, so they can improve, therefore I suppose two types of feedbacks shall be given.

 

Btw, when I give feedback to freelancer, which parts are private and public?

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Community Guru
Ashish K Member Since: Mar 1, 2016
4 of 18

For the interface provided to freelancers the top part of the rating is private.

 

I think it says 'Private feedback' as well. It reads something like ' On a scale of 1 to 10, how likely would you recommend this client/freelancer' or something to that effect.

 

Regards,

Community Guru
Lisa W Member Since: Nov 14, 2015
5 of 18

I agree with what others said, but the issue at stake here is the way Upwork itself judges freelancers based on that feedback, not necessarily the feedback itself. Anything lower than a 5 and your JSS starts to drop. A perfectly good freelancer who completes jobs on time, does what the client asks, and provides good quality can still lose points by having a client who considers a 4 the best and will never give a 5.

 

The way the platform is set up, I feel that a '5' should be standard if the job is completed successfully. Anything less than that should bring the score down incrementally. Someone going above and beyond can be rewarded with rave reviews in the comments.

 

Not to mention, going above and beyond can backfire. I did it for one client and was 'scolded' for not providing exactly what was asked. I was told "I'm intelligent enough to know what I want and I know how to ask for it. It's not your job to be creative, it's to give me exactly what I asked for."

 

So if a job is lacking, then honestly lower the feedback. If a freelancer gave you exactly what you asked for, I think that warrants a 5. I don't think it would be such a big deal if it wasn't tied to JSS. There's no objective standard that everyone can follow on feedback because we all think about it differently. Unfortunately, when those little stars have a direct impact on future employment, it causes a bit of desperation, although I would never personally ask for someone to change feedback once they provided it.

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Active Member
João P Member Since: Dec 11, 2013
6 of 18

"The way the platform is set up, I feel that a '5' should be standard if the job is completed successfully" with quality and exactly as in the contract. Yes, I always give 5.0.

 

But I have seen different ways of "successfully" completing the job. As you may know one can finish building a house in a veriety of different ways.

 

Warning to upwork: from now on I always give 5.0 on public feedback. I don't want to have "conscience problems" (like pointed out by one freelancer when I gave 4 for a less quality job) or to have them criticizing me for not being good for their "business" (this guy got 5 at all, less one feature that got 4).

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Moderator
Vladimir G Moderator Member Since: Oct 31, 2014
7 of 18

Hi Joao,

 

Thank you for your honest feedback. You should continue rating your freelancers according to their performance on your contracts.

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Community Guru
Gerry S Member Since: Nov 23, 2014
8 of 18

Speaking RHETORICALLY...

 

How many "bonuses" have you given for a "superior" job?

 

Or is that when a freelancer "deserves" a 5.0?

 

Does a freelancer who does the job AS SPECIFIED not deserve a 5.0? Why not? How much is ENOUGH?

 

Why does anyone think that someone has to OVERPERFORM FOR NOTHING in order to earn a 5.0?

 

UNDERPERFORMING deserver less than a 5.0; not a job completed as contracted.

 

Don't expect (demand?) something for nothing ... particularly when you don't put your money where your mouth is (by giving bonuses).

 

(Speaking RHETORICALLY of course).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
9 of 18

@Gerry S wrote:

Speaking RHETORICALLY...

 

How many "bonuses" have you given for a "superior" job?

 

Or is that when a freelancer "deserves" a 5.0?

 

Does a freelancer who does the job AS SPECIFIED not deserve a 5.0? Why not? How much is ENOUGH?

 

Why does anyone think that someone has to OVERPERFORM FOR NOTHING in order to earn a 5.0?

 

UNDERPERFORMING deserver less than a 5.0; not a job completed as contracted.

 

Don't expect (demand?) something for nothing ... particularly when you don't put your money where your mouth is (by giving bonuses).

 

(Speaking RHETORICALLY of course). 

 

 


You're assuming that all (or most) of these freelancers did a great job and the OP has still left them less than 5. I have no data either way, but I think it's only right to assume that the freelancers didn't do a great job... and that's why the OP has left them less than 5. If the OP had said that "I've had all these freelancers do an amazing job for me and I can't understand why they're upset getting a 3 or a 4" then that would be different.

 

And if we go purely with reality... it's more likely that not every freelancer was perfect, than every freelancer being perfect.

 

As for doing the job "as specified" and deserving a 5, that's not how the feedback works. Only two out of the six criteria are related to the work, the final result, the reason for being hired. The others are related to availability, deadlines, cooperation and communication. If somebody writes me the finest book I have ever read in my life then they're getting 5 for quality and skills, but I can't rate them 5 in the other areas if they take a week to reply to every email, they have hardly any communication skills and the book is two years late. If the deadline wasn't an issue then I'd probably still leave them a five if it was that good, but if the book needed to be delivered by a certain date otherwise it was useless to me... should I still leave 5's across the board? The ends rarely justify the means.

 

Unless you've worked for this client before, and have first hand knowledge of his practices, I think there's far too much of an 'us versus them' attitude here. Clients side with clients, freelancers side with freelancers, assuming the other is in the wrong. It's definitely worth keeping an open mind, trying to go only on the facts etc... but sometimes you have to take what people are saying at face value. I think too many low budgets, scams and dodgy clients has put freelancers on the defensive.

 

I don't like getting less than 5, but if I've not been 100% on a job then should I get a 5? Although there are a lot of great freelancer here, there are some who aren't. Client who hire those who aren't are likely to be disappointed. Disappointed clients are no good for Upwork... they don't come back, they talk badly of Upwork if anyone asks. Good freelancers are good for Upwork... they do come back and they speak positively of Upwork. More clients, more projects, more money going through the pipes of commerce.

 

So if a freelancer deserves a 1, a 2, a 3 or a 4... but they've got a 5, it's giving an inaccurate representation of the quality of the freelancer. One which will inaccurately influence the decision of future clients. That's no good!  

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
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Community Guru
Lisa W Member Since: Nov 14, 2015
10 of 18

@Scott E wrote:

As for doing the job "as specified" and deserving a 5, that's not how the feedback works. Only two out of the six criteria are related to the work, the final result, the reason for being hired. The others are related to availability, deadlines, cooperation and communication.

 

When a client specifies a project with a specific deadline and asks for a certain level of communication, and all those criteria are met, that is part of the specifications of the job. I assume that if a job is done 'as specified,' it includes all the criteria you mentioned. 

 

 

So if a freelancer deserves a 1, a 2, a 3 or a 4... but they've got a 5, it's giving an inaccurate representation of the quality of the freelancer. One which will inaccurately influence the decision of future clients. That's no good!  

 

The main problem here is that what people 'deserve' is completely subjective. If I hire someone, lay out the details of the project, and the contractor meets every criteria that I specify, then I believe they deserve a 5. They shouldn't be penalized for not going above and beyond or blowing my socks off. Someone else may disagree, and think a 5 is only for outstanding performance, not 'meeting expectations.'

 

I had one client who loved everything I did. It was one of my first jobs and I got glowing praise for every submission, etc. etc. The pay was extremely low, but I had taken it with the understanding that I could continue submitting for as long or as little as I liked. When I explained that I wasn't going to be able to submit any more, he begged me to keep the contract open, and then dinged me for availability. Not a big deal, but still completely subjective. From my perspective, the agreement was never intended for me to be available indefinitely. From his perspective, he still wanted my work. Does that really warrant a lower score? Or should contractors be held hostage by the threat of a lower score because they won't be 'available' forever, or keep 'communicating or cooperating'  indefinitely simply because that's what the client wants?


 

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