Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Statistics

b8416cb9
Active Member
Samson R Member Since: Dec 5, 2016
1 of 9

Can we see the numbers of Freelancers you have interviewed and what percentages say that there has been an improvement with the unvieling of UPWORKS? Also some questions asked would also help. Standard deviations?

 

Elance was a much better plateform. It was less expensive. Going from 5% to 20% sure made the company happy. As someone who needs to find Freelancers for my projects it is much harder. Paying $500.00 is upsurd.

 

Of course, this will not appear on your blog because it does not serve the company's best interest in anyway.

 

If it was to appear, many would concur with me.

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
2 of 9

@Samson R wrote:

Can we see the numbers of Freelancers you have interviewed and what percentages say that there has been an improvement with the unvieling of UPWORKS? Also some questions asked would also help. Standard deviations?

 

Elance was a much better plateform. It was less expensive. Going from 5% to 20% sure made the company happy. As someone who needs to find Freelancers for my projects it is much harder. Paying $500.00 is upsurd.

 

Of course, this will not appear on your blog because it does not serve the company's best interest in anyway.

 

If it was to appear, many would concur with me.


Hello!

 

How did you calculate paying $500?

 

Kind regards,

 

KC

 

 

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
3 of 9

If it were to appear.

 

Enlighten me. What is a "standard deviation"?

mtngigi
Community Guru
Virginia F Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
4 of 9

It's appearing, but also confusing as to what you're talking about.

 

What's $500? And like Nichola, I'd like to know what "standard deviation" refers to.

 

Yes, Elance had features we miss, but oh well ... here we are. A lot of us moved to Upwork and are trying to make it work just as well as Elance did.

p_valdes
Community Guru
Pablo V Member Since: Dec 16, 2014
5 of 9

Standard deviation is a basic and very important statistical term. Used everywhere.

p_valdes
Community Guru
Pablo V Member Since: Dec 16, 2014
6 of 9

The math part is boring, but the value of the concept is easy to grasp.

 

Let suppose that a client ask two freelancers how many time they need to do some task, i.e. translating a few pages of text. Freelancer "A" have done the same task three times before, spending: 1 hour 5 minutes, 1 hour and 55 minutes respectively.

 

Freelancer "B" did also the task three times before, spending 30 minutes, 1 hour and 1 hour 30 minutes respectively.

 

So both freelancers say "This will take me one hour on average..., I'll bill you more or less one hour".

 

Standard deviation is a way to control the expected error in the measure, the real meaning under "more or less an hour". You could express this important info saying that "task can be done by A in an hour plus/minus 5 min", and can be done by B  "in 1 hour plus/minus 30 minutes". This plus/minus part, that you can see in all scientific articles, is the standard deviation or SD. Can be calculated, but the formula is not relevant here to understand the idea.

 

Smaller the SD, more reliable your measure, thus translator "A" would be a safer choice for the task. SD is designed also to be smaller when you repeat the same task a lot of times, so you can know if a result can be trusted or not, by its associated SD.

cupidmedia
Community Guru
Jennifer D Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
7 of 9

Pablo, that example doesn't appear to be what the OP was referring to though. They just threw "Standard deviations?" in with a bunch of other questions, and it doesn't seem particularly relevant to the questions they asked.

p_valdes
Community Guru
Pablo V Member Since: Dec 16, 2014
8 of 9

Former was just an example to explain the concept; but is the same problem in fact. Is just that the question is implicit in the OP post. Is not complicated to fill the gaps if we notice some keywords.

 

> Can we see the numbers of Freelancers you have interviewed?

 

OP is asking for sample size.

 

> and what percentages say that there has been an improvement with the unvieling of UPWORKS?

 

Translated: Is the average money earned "after" the new rules applied statistically bigger than in the "elancers" group?

 

> Standard deviations?

 

OP is asking for the 'sigma' value (SD).

 

> Elance was a much better plateform...

 

etc, etc...

 

What the OP said is probably: "How can we know if freelancers (or clients?) are really earning more money with the new system, if we don't know the sample size, and the standard deviations of the variable "money earned by freelancers?"

 

Both sample size and SD are directly linked in statistics with the question: how much can we trust in our results?

 

The fact is that you can believe the claim that "freelancers are earning more money than before", but you can't confirm it using statistics, because, as Samson R points, there is not enough info.

 

On the other hand, most people shouldn't really care about this claim, because complex problems can't be easily reduced to schematic answers. Some freelancers and fields will earn more than before, and other will earn less than before for several reasons related and unrelated with elance becoming upwork. The right question here is "Am I earning more now?"

yitwail
Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
9 of 9

OP wrote, "Paying $500.00 is upsurd."

 

(That's rather clever, if it was deliberate and not a typo, though I might disagree. Cat Wink)

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS