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What can a Client do if the output is not up to Client's standard?

Active Member
Denny E Member Since: Mar 27, 2017
1 of 7

Hi all,

I am new to UW and I am curious what a Client can do if output/ deliverable is not OK.
I would like to know what are the options for the Client when project has been funded but output is not satisfactory. In worst case, can the Client approach another freelancer to work on the project and release the payment to that new freelancer?

Thanks for your attention.

Have a nice day,
Denny

Community Guru
Vivek K Member Since: May 28, 2016
2 of 7

Denny

As far as I understand, on fixed price contract the dispute option lies with the freelancer.  You can ask for the refund.But the freelancer has to agree to it.

If it goes to mediation you will probably win only in case of non-delivery. Though am not sure of it. The last option if the dispute is not resolved in mediation is the arbitration.

 

 

In my opinion, If talking to freelancer does not resolve it, I would rather advise to close the contract, give feedback to the freelancer and move on.

Trying to recover money may be the waste of time.

But that is strictly my personal opinion. 

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
3 of 7

@Denny E wrote:

  1. I would like to know what are the options for the Client when project has been funded but output is not satisfactory.
  2. In worst case, can the Client approach another freelancer to work on the project and release the payment to that new freelancer?

 


 1. Once the freelancer has submitted the work and requested payment, you have 14 days to review the work and, if needed, request changes. The key is communication with the freelancer to make it easier for them to give you exactly what you want, and to achieve that "what you want" must be perfectly defined before the contract even starts.

 

2. No, that's not how it works. If you are unhappy enough with the work to want to end the contract without paying you can request your Escrow funds back. BUT the freelancer then has 7 days to either agree to the request, or dispute it. If the freelancer disputes the process enters a mediation stage, where Upwork tries to get you and the freelancer to agree on a mutually acceptable outcome (usually by way of compromise = partial payment)

If that fails, it can go to arbitration which costs you, the freelancer, and Upwork nearly $ 300 (each), which you don't get back even if you win.

 

Really it should never go that far. If you choose your freelancer wisely, offer a fair price for what you want, communicate effectively, set expectations clearly from the outset, and start with small milestones (so you can just pay the freelancer for their time and effort in small stages, and never "risk" significant sums of money) there would never be any need to go to dispute.

Moderator
Vladimir G Moderator Member Since: Oct 31, 2014
4 of 7

Hi Denny,

 

Thanks for posting this question. We do offer payment protection to clients under certain conditions outlined in the following two Help articles. Note that clients are advised to first communicate with their freelancers and try to resolve the problem amicably. If the problem with the quality of the delivered work can't be resolved directly, clients can file a dispute on Fixed-Price contracts on this account, and our team will assist them through the different stages of the dispute process. On Hourly jobs clients can only dispute the time their freelancer logged and not the product they delivered.

 

To ensure a successful outcome of their contract, clients can use the tools and advised procedures when reviewing and hiring freelancers on Upwork. 

 

Clients are indeed able to hire a different freelancer for the same job, on a new contract.

 

Let me know if you have any questions and would like for our team to assist you with posting your first jobs and inviting freelancers with the right talent to bid on your job.

Active Member
Denny E Member Since: Mar 27, 2017
5 of 7

Thanks all for your feedback. I hope I don't have to go that far.. Smiley Happy

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
6 of 7

A client with a significant amount of work to be done should expect a certain percentage of the work submitted by various freelances to be unusuable.

 

Stop working with the freelancers who submit unusable or low-quality work. Continue working only with the highest-quality freelancers.

 

Receiving unusable work is part of the cost of doing business. It is normal. It is profitable to evaluate all work, pay for all work, and distinguish between low-quality and high-quality work.

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
7 of 7

@Preston H wrote:

A client with a significant amount of work to be done should expect a certain percentage of the work submitted by various freelances to be unusuable.


 Agreed, but the percentage should be quite low if the client hires top rated or rising talents instead of the freelancers with the lowest bid or rate. I for one can count on the fingers of one hand (in decimal) the number of jobs that I could not complete out of nearly 300 jobs.

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