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What if I am not satisfied - Client

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Active Member
Asaad A Member Since: May 6, 2020
1 of 8

If I hired someone to do a job but his/her work was not good, what should I do?

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Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
2 of 8

 


Asaad A wrote:

If I hired someone to do a job but his/her work was not good, what should I do?


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Cut your losses. Pay the freelancer, close the contract, leave appropriate feedback, and then find someone who will deliver what you want. 

 

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Active Member
Asaad A Member Since: May 6, 2020
3 of 8

Pay with a bad results? it's a very good business.

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Moderator
Bojan S Moderator Member Since: Mar 9, 2018
4 of 8

Hi Asaad,

 

I'm sorry to hear about your experience. Could you please click on my name and send me a PM with more information about the freelancer you're referring to. I'll check that for you and assist you accordingly.

 

Thank you.


~ Bojan
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Active Member
Asaad A Member Since: May 6, 2020
5 of 8

Thank you, Bojan. Its a general question not areal one.

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Moderator
Bojan S Moderator Member Since: Mar 9, 2018
6 of 8

Thanks for following up, Asaad.

 

To address your concern regarding which Payment Protections are in place for Upwork Clients, kindly check next help articles:

 

Let us know if you need any further assistance.

Thank you.


~ Bojan
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Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
7 of 8

Ultimately a client needs to decide if they are a businessperson or a mentor.

 

A businessperson puts his own interests and the interests of his company first.

 

A mentor is focused on the needs of someone else, and sacrifices for that person. Like Mr. Miyagi in "Karate Kid." Daniel-San started out being horrible at karate. But Mr. Miyagi wanted to mentor him, in karate and in life. So Mr. Miyagi persevered, and trained him. It never made any business sense to do so. It was not about money.

 

Many clients are like that. They want to spend time with a freelancer who is bad at karate or bad at what he does. They want to make sure the freelance is schooled or mentored or punished, or does not get away with earning $5 when his work was only worth $4. It's all very spiritual and karmic. Good for them.

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Community Guru
Abinadab A Member Since: Sep 26, 2016
8 of 8

Asaad,

What you want to do is minimise the risk that a freelancer you hired will deliver unsatisfactory work on a large project.

If you're that unsure (new freelancer, low rating), etc., you want to hire them for small milestones at a time. Keep in mind that it's against the Upwork ToS to ask for free work, even as a sample.

Once you confirm in this manner that you're ok with their style of work and results, you can hire them for larger chunks of work.

If they don't deliver for the smaller jobs, proceed to end the contract as you have been advised above.

You can always go into a dispute though.

But trust me, it's a very time consuming process you'd wish you never got into.

As much as possible, avoid disputes on these platforms.

 

Now how do you set up a test project to make sure your freelancer is a good fit?

A lot has been published on this matter - feel free to consult them.

 

That said, I'd like to inform you that there is a subset of freelancers that don't perform well when you mention the word "test".

It's called the Heinsberg rule (it's been several years I encountered the term, so I might be wrong, but something in those lines), that the act of measuring something actually changes the measurement itself.

 

So, ideally, don't mention that you are doing a test.

And, make the test project large enough to attract the heavyweight freelancers who won't give two hoots about your $10 test project.

Also, mention in your test project that you're looking for freelancers who will hopefully have availability for other chunks of work, moving forward.

But at the same time, don't sound like you're trying to bait them with promise of more work; freelancers hear those promises a lot, and 95% turn out to be fake promises meant to get a freelancer to do some quick work for buttom-of-the-rung pay.

 

Thanks!

 

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