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1c9938c6
Member

When hiring, what is the most important?

Hi All,

 

I am new to the hiring process and would like to leverage the experience of the forum, after I submitted the job posting what parameters I need to pay attention the most to ensure I am hiring good freelancer?

 

Also is this common to ask a freelancers several questions or small technical quiz to ensure he is the best fit?

 

Thank You

Iris

10 REPLIES 10
prestonhunter
Member

I don't think it is common to ask a freelancer general technical questions. Ask her about what she will do on your project.

 

And, no, you really can't give freelancers technical quizzes. Unless you hire them and pay them to take the quiz. I don't know how helpful that would be anyway. Who cares how well they do on a quiz you give them?

 

Best thing is to hire from among the most expensive contractors available in the skill area you need, or hire multiple less expensive people on a short term basis and continue working with the best, or none of them if their work does not satisfy you.

 

Plan to hire a number of mediocre and bad freelancers until you find some good ones. Be willing to close contracts on freelancers after only a hour or two.

Preston, based on your approach it is trial and error process, if I will follow what you are suggesting I will waste time and money.

 

Assume I have 6 candidates and all of them claim that they are great and have 5 stars, how I can pick and choose the best?

Best on past the feedback? Or I need to find if one of them he did exact work like I am asking?

or best the solution they suggest to my problem ?

droleary
Member


@iris C wrote:

after I submitted the job posting what parameters I need to pay attention the most to ensure I am hiring good freelancer?


Nobody here can know what job post you're referring to, so there is no way to know if you even have a good freelancer in the applicant pool.  Clients too often fail to realize that candidate selection had already begun when you started writing the job description.  If you're waiting until this late date to even begin thinking of the criteria you're going to use to make a selection, it really doesn't matter who you hire.

 

Darrin,

If my job post is detail and cover all I need, it is still can attract freelancers that are not fit to perform the work

I am sure there are other factors that can help me to make the right decision?

Maybe the past work? What else?


@iris C wrote:

If my job post is detail and cover all I need, it is still can attract freelancers that are not fit to perform the work


Perhaps, but the chances are greater that an obviously superior candidate will apply if your job description makes clear exactly what you're looking for.  If you really can't decide between all the candidates you have, your project is already failing.  Nobody here can help that.  You need to take a step back and think about starting from scratch using a more effective approach.

 

pandoraharper
Member

Doing the proper due diligence BEFORE hiring is as important as the hiring process itself.  In my experince, small business clients who don't have an HR department often have no clue how to start recruiting.

 

Since Iris provided zero detail about the job post in question, I suspect that she is new to hiring in general, and therefore I hope the below is useful:

 

While not all positions require this much "attention", the follow recruiting concepts may help clients who are hiring for advanced positions, and quicker turnaround for smaller jobs:

 

1. Know the who, why and what - Be very clear on what kind of role you want to fill, the best personality type for that role, and the specfific skills/experience the role requires.

 

2. Draft different job descrptions for each job - Test them out, Some might work, some might not.. Some job descriptions need to be very detailed, and others not so much. Be very clear in your job description about what your looking for. If you want an experinced freelancer's attention, your job description needs to sell them on your job.

 

3. Hire often? - Develop a system so that you can quickly generate quality recruitment plans, job descriptions and interview questions.

 

4. Onboarding and Training  - If your new hires need to be trained, have that training built and organized before you hire. And, if you hire often, having a quality onboarding process will save a lot of time and effort in the long term.

 

5. Don't want to do this yourself?  - There are several highly qualified freelancers on Upwork who specialize in the Recruitment process. Consider hiring them for your advanced job roles.

 

6. Recruitment Training -  Every small business can gain from forming a recruitment plan that best suites their small business. Lot's of good, affordable webinar training courses are online, so if budget is a concern, this might be the route to go.

 

Thank You for the detail response

You mentioned to check the "the best personality type for that role" - how I can do that?

And regarding interview questions, according to Preston it is not common to ask, does freelancers react positively to request to answer questions?

I know it seems counter-intuitive, but the only reason I recommend hiring multiple people is to save time and money.

 

If you have MORE time and MORE money, then you can spend time interviewing people, screening them trying to pick the best out of many.

 

That is what you should do if you have a lot of time and a lot of money to spend on the process.

 

But as a client, I have been busy and I wanted to save money, so I skip a lot of those steps and use a more "shotgun" or "trial and error" approach.

 

I do not actually believe it is possible to predict which contractors will be good if you're hiring low-cost contractors. There is a significant proportion of contractors at the low pay scale range whose work is mostly unusable.

 

I have sometimes posted a job, hired somebody, worked with them, and closed the contract within the space of two hours. As a contractor, I have been hired and finished work within an hour. Contractors love getting top feedback scores and good pay for a job they only had to spend an hour or two on and didn't need to interview for. These compressed timeframes are possible by doing away with steps such as screening, interviewing, etc.


@Preston H wrote:

These compressed timeframes are possible by doing away with steps such as screening, interviewing, etc.


There are not just time savings, but additional cost savings that can be realized beyond the "time is money" ones you already mentioned for the client.  There is also quite a significant overhead for freelancers when they have to sift through the job listings to find something worthwhile, and then endure the proposal process.  All that time gets factored in to the price a client pays.  If more clients worked like you do, the base rates for freelancers would probably come down even further.

 


@iris C wrote:

Thank You for the detail response

You mentioned to check the "the best personality type for that role" - how I can do that?

And regarding interview questions, according to Preston it is not common to ask, does freelancers react positively to request to answer questions?


@ @Iris

 

In many cases, the good fit of a freelancer depends more on their eagerness to work, their schedule, their reliability, their ablity to learn, etc. Many skills and propriatary processes can be taught, but the other "personality" aspects of a freelancer, not so much.

 

This is what I meant about personality, and you need to develop your own questions that will give you necessary clues about the freelancer.

 

Finally, there are questions, and there are questions. Technical questions might be appropriate for a Technical job, but not for say, a General VA job.

 

If a freelancer is unwilling to answer a question such as "How many hours are you available each week", or "give me an example of past work you have done in this field", then you would be right to wonder if they really want the job.

 

Preston did not say "don't ask", he said " I don't think it is common to ask a freelancer general technical questions. Ask her about what she will do on your project."

 

Several assumptions are obvious in his answer, but his main point is that it's not common to require answers to a lot of highly technical questions, from a prospective freelancer who is going to provide clerical services. Please note we still do not know what sort of position your trying to fill, or what kind of freelancer your looking to hire.

 

On that note however, you do want anyone you hire to be computer savvy, and generally internet capable. I myself have interviewed a suprprising number US freelancers who actually were neither computer savvy or internet capable, and I make no assumptions about these abilites anymore.

 

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