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Re: All That Jazz

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
21 of 39

This is a jazz standard, and the second one isn't strictly a jazz version, but I like the way vocalists can bring such different nuances to the same song.



 

 

(warning: #2 has country influences -- but jazz is supposed to be about mixing it up stylistically, so I think I can justify it)

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
22 of 39

Renata, there's very little country influence on jazz that I can think of (the closet thing I can think of is that Charlie Haden, bassist with alto saxophonist Ornette Coleman, came from a family of bluegrass musicians), but there was jazz influenced country in the form of western swing. This isn't a great performance of the song by any means, but it's hard enough locating Bob Wills videos, and it does refer to the moon. 

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
23 of 39

Here's a two-fer from a favorite album of mine, a little bluegrassy-jazz mashup. (John, you may have created a monster when you showed me how to do this!)

 

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
24 of 39

@Phyllis G wrote:

Here's a two-fer from a favorite album of mine, a little bluegrassy-jazz mashup. (John, you may have created a monster when you showed me how to do this!)

 


Not at all, that was great. And the way Fleck and Miller 'traded fours' towards the end of the second piece was very jazzy. Cat Very Happy It's also worthwhile remembering that banjo, like jazz, was an African-American invention, and it was a featured instrument in New Orleans jazz ensembles.

 

Here's one of the immortals, who had an affinity for Calypso, perhaps because his parents immigrated from the Virgin Islands. He's accompanied by genius drummer Max Roach.

 

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
25 of 39

I think I'm going to post another female vocalist. On the theme of mixing it up stylistically, this was actually a traditional Celtic folk song that was sung in the Appalachian Mountains of the US. Nina Simone singing it turns it into something of a completely different order.

(I don't know if I'm finding the best recordings. I'm just trying to locate the ones without commercials.)




Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
26 of 39

@Renata S wrote:

I think I'm going to post another female vocalist. On the theme of mixing it up stylistically, this was actually a traditional Celtic folk song that was sung in the Appalachian Mountains of the US. Nina Simone singing it turns it into something of a completely different order.

(I don't know if I'm finding the best recordings. I'm just trying to locate the ones without commercials.)


 Ms Simone is a great stylist and pianist, but stylistically she's all over the map. Ad free video is nice, as long as it's not an Upwork ad. Cat Wink

Here's a great song composed by jazz pianist Dr. BIlly Taylor, and stylistically, it's gospel if anything:

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
27 of 39

Stylistically all over the map? This seems to be another stylistic diversion for someone else. (You can find just about anything on YouTube.)

 

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
28 of 39

The elder Van Halen could certainly play clarinet. Since maps came up, I noticed we haven't featured anyone from Africa, so here's the great South African trumpeter-vocalist Hugh Masekela. He also happens to be the 4th trumpeter-vocalist in this thread, the others being Louis Armstrong, Bunny Berrigan, and Chet Baker. There may be others in jazz, but can't think of any right now. While Mr. B, Billy Eckstine could play, he was primarily a vocalist. And Louis Prima and Herb Alpert were mainly known as pop musicians.

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
29 of 39

For my first and probably last double feature in this thread, I'm featuring my second most favorite jazz artist, Thelonious Monk. Since he was renowned as much for his composing as his piano playing, I think it's appropriate he be featured twice, with 2 originals. The first was dedicated to his young son, Thelonious Jr., who liked to imitate the sound of a cartoon tugboat named Little Toot. Hence the title "Little Rootie Tootie", and I imagine the 3 note figure Monk plays repeatedly is evoking that tugboat horn. Jazz immortal Art Blakey is on drums.

It was extremely difficult choosing just 2 pieces to be honest, but with "Ruby, My Dear", we also hear John Coltrane's great feel for ballads. Monk took Coltrane under his wing after Miles Davis fired him for his drug habit, and Coltrane blossomed under Monk's tutelage.

 

 

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
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Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
30 of 39

When I featured Monk's Little Rootie Tootie, I forgot to mention it's an I Got Rhythm contrafact, as are 100's of other jazz compositions. Here's another tune based on rhythm changes, by perhaps the most famous jazz musician/vocalist.

 

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
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