Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Re: COVID-19 Vaccine

Highlighted
Community Guru
Jamie F Member Since: Mar 7, 2010
11 of 20

I read recently that British company is already making a vaccine. 

It still has to pass testing first but such is their confidence that the vaccine will pass that they have gone ahead with production regardless. It is been mooted that it could be available as early as September. (How realistic that really is, I have no idea).

Fingers crossed. 

Highlighted
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
BEST ANSWER
12 of 20

re: "How realistic that really is, I have no idea."

 

Let's put it this way:

I would love to see something available as soon as possible.

But don't hold your breath.

 

I work primarily in the biomedical research industry, including vaccine development. Sorry... but it is very difficult thing to do.

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Community Guru
Bill H Member Since: Aug 18, 2017
13 of 20

Mary, "In my state, the average age of patients who require hospitalization is dropping. In other words, more and more younger people are getting sicker." Maybe. There are multiple other possible explanations. Some starting points: hospitals have been going broke because of the lockdowns, and laying off medical professionals; "hospitalized" and "requiring hospitalization" are not the same thing; except in a few states, we've realized we have to protect the elderly and there is now increased testing of young people; corona, rhino and influenza viruses plus a number of others all cause respiratory diseases, and there is no uniform reporting set of criteria for diagnosis. Distribution of mild and serious cases for each age demographic remains unchanged, as well as infection fatality rate.

 

Preston, "I work primarily in the biomedical research industry, including vaccine development. Sorry... but it is very difficult thing to do." Correct. Convalescent (serum antibody) therapy is mostly working and fairly widespread, which means that if we can develop a vaccine that triggers creation of virus-specific antibodies we'll be in good shape. We may never have a single agreed vaccine, rather a number of vaccines that work differently. This is what the Director of the US National Institutes of Health is predicting. An attenuated virus vaccine may be too risky to administer to high-risk individuals, so whether it works better than the alternatives may not be the primary factor. A killed-virus vaccine would be safer, even if less effective.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
14 of 20

The OP does not have a monoply on this thread nor does he know more than anyone else about the pandemic: 

Here is a snippet from CNN news today: 

 

17 min ago

Younger people with Covid-19 is a "smoldering fire" that will hit vulnerable populations, expert says

From CNN's Gisela Crespo

Younger people testing positive for Covid-19 at a higher rate is a "smoldering fire" that will hit vulnerable populations, said Erin Bromage, a CNN medical analyst and a biology professor at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Bromage said health experts didn't focus on younger people at the beginning of the pandemic because the priority was the older population and those with underlying health conditions who required hospitalization.

"We're now seeing what is really happening, which is those 18- to 44-year-olds are being affected at a really high rate. Their social networks, their employment, is allowing them to mix at a higher rate, and we're seeing the infection rate – especially in Texas, Florida and Arizona – just skyrocketing in that demographic," she said while speaking today on CNN’s “New Day,”

Bromage explained that while younger people with Covid-19 are not "as prone to severe disease as the elderly," they will still put this population at risk. 

"It's just that smoldering fire – but as more of them get infected, the chance of them interacting with the vulnerable population increases and hits that vulnerable population, and then the inferno just begins," Bromage told CNN's John Berman. "That's when we end up with lots of sickness and lots of disease."

 

And while it is true, that (for the moment) young people will probably survive the virus, more vulnerable sectors of the community will be affected. Also with the virus permutating all the time, what is to stop it finding that young people make particularly juicy hosts. 

 

Anybody is allowed an opinion. and anybody is allowed to question, even if they have no medical background whatsoever (not even a course in microbiology). 

 

Google is an incomparably useful information tool, and I certainly have no hesitation using it to this end or even when I don't speak another language - Esperanto - for example. 

 

 

Highlighted
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
15 of 20

Jamie F wrote:

I read recently that British company is already making a vaccine. 

It still has to pass testing first but such is their confidence that the vaccine will pass that they have gone ahead with production regardless. It is been mooted that it could be available as early as September. (How realistic that really is, I have no idea).

Fingers crossed. 


It is true that vaccine research—virtually everywhere, I believe—has been fast-tracked toward production without the full complement of usual safeguards to measure efficacy and effectiveness against risk.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Bill H Member Since: Aug 18, 2017
16 of 20

Petra,

 

You're out of your league here. You are using language suitable to a political campaign ad intended to demean your opponent, not a reasoned discussion of a vaccine for COVID19. I'm not running against you for any position; if you feel we're in some sort of competition, you're on your own.

 

"We" refers to the US. The US had all of what was needed. It is possible that in a country of 330M people, in which both Germany and Italy could be lost from view, there were a few cases where something was mis-directed. That's different from not having what was needed. There are places where there are insufficient ventilators, such as Mali, which has about five for a populationn of five million. There are places where there is little reporting, such as central Asia as well as most of Africa and Latin America.

 

I'm sure you have friends who are physicians treating patients. If you want to use them to discredit what I'm writing, please give me their addresses. I see no point in exchanging information with thtem through you. If you believe I'm disseminating disinformation to the detriment of users of the forum, please report me. I'm aware of few other frequent contributors who are able to follow the literature. Your Masters in Microbiology from Google University doesn't qualify.

 

Your final pargraph reminds me of "scientific" lists of side effects of medications, warning that some are extremely dangerous when, in fact, they're among the most benign in the world. https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/ shows that two percent of active cases are serious or critical globally, and 98% are mild. If you believe that proves your point that I'm not qualified to write about this, go for it.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
17 of 20

Bill H wrote:

Petra,

 

You're out of your league here. You are using language suitable to a political campaign ad intended to demean your opponent, not a reasoned discussion of a vaccine for COVID19. I'm not running against you for any position; if you feel we're in some sort of competition, you're on your own.

 

"We" refers to the US. The US had all of what was needed. It is possible that in a country of 330M people, in which both Germany and Italy could be lost from view, there were a few cases where something was mis-directed. That's different from not having what was needed. There are places where there are insufficient ventilators, such as Mali, which has about five for a populationn of five million. There are places where there is little reporting, such as central Asia as well as most of Africa and Latin America.

 

I'm sure you have friends who are physicians treating patients. If you want to use them to discredit what I'm writing, please give me their addresses. I see no point in exchanging information with thtem through you. If you believe I'm disseminating disinformation to the detriment of users of the forum, please report me. I'm aware of few other frequent contributors who are able to follow the literature. Your Masters in Microbiology from Google University doesn't qualify.

 

Your final pargraph reminds me of "scientific" lists of side effects of medications, warning that some are extremely dangerous when, in fact, they're among the most benign in the world. https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/ shows that two percent of active cases are serious or critical globally, and 98% are mild. If you believe that proves your point that I'm not qualified to write about this, go for it.


TL;DR

 

One only needs to follow the news reported by varied and reputable sources, and be in touch with friends and associates across the U.S. and abroad, to know that most of what you've been spouting about Covid-19 is utter nonsense and that it's an utter waste of time and attention to engage in discussion about it.

 

Entertain yourself if you must.

 

Highlighted
Community Guru
Amanda L Member Since: Jan 23, 2018
18 of 20
As a medical researcher who has published in numerous peer-reviewed journals and is quite able to follow and understand medical and scientific research, all I can say is I'm glad you're not the leading scientific mind working on this problem. Additionally the crisis happening right now is more than merely a virus with mo vaccine, but the socioeconomic and sociopolitical implications of the pandemic and the development of a vaccine or treatment, and you're analysis of what is so and what is or will happen is oversimplified and faulty. Ignoring or invalidating what others have experienced during this crisis does not make it any less true. It just means you will never be able to understand the totality of this issues or contribute to a real discussion about them. You're basically just shouting at the air, wanting to appear informed, and thinking that having read a bit makes you informed. I don't have time to write more than I have already to educate you on why you're not as informed as you think you are.

My hope is that you'll do a little more reading beyond epidemiology journals and get a fuller picture of what the medical community and society at large is facing. And maybe next time you want to have a discussion, try to remember what discussion means.
Highlighted
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
19 of 20

Bill H wrote:

The virus is generally not dangerous to those under 65; we always had all the hospital and ICU beds, plus ventilators, we needed. We knew a lot about how to deal with the virus before the first case: encourage people to go outdoors, quarantine old people and those with chronic heart, lung and/or kidney conditions, and the immune-suppressed. Quarantine means strictly limiting outside contact with them. There are new treatments and vaccines under investigation; we're going to be fine.


Thanks, Bill, for pointing out your lack of expertise, lack of knowledge, and willingness to retail propaganda in preference to facts in the present crisis. It puts the rest of your posts in perspective.

Highlighted
Moderator
Valeria K Moderator Member Since: Mar 6, 2014
20 of 20

Hi All,

 

This thread has been closed from further posts as it was determined to be inappropriate and contrary to the purposes of this forum.

 

Thanks.

~ Valeria
Untitled
TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS