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Calling on the experts: Problems wrapping ul elements with divs

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Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
1 of 13

I did fine in the first parts of this course but i'm stuck here trying to do this darn wrapping thing. 

Can you tell me what I'm doing wrong? 

Thanks! 

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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
BEST ANSWER
2 of 13

You're missing the </ul> closing tag. Smiley Happy

 

<div>

<ul>

<li>blah</li>

</ul>

</div>

 

You have

 

<div>

<ul>

<li>blah</li>

</div>

 

 

You have to close each tag.

View solution in original post

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Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
3 of 13

YAAAAAY! thanks Jennifer!!!!! I didn't notice that ul in front of those li's so i was closing the next ul tords the bottom!!!

 

MUAH!!!! 

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Community Guru
John B Member Since: Feb 20, 2009
4 of 13

Codecademy is awesome.

 

I'm a big fan....2307 points, 207 badges and 11 skills later for me

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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
5 of 13

I'ma bout to sign up. I think I might mess with Ruby or something. I dunno. I hate JS with every fiber of my being. I hope JS gets cancer.

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Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
6 of 13

 Mariska, this might be cheating but, you can go to W3C Validator, choose 'Validate by Direct Input', copy/paste the full html of the page or a fragment, click 'More Options', optionally select 'Validate HTML Fragment' if you're checking a fragment, click the 'Show Source' checkbox, then click the 'Check' button and it will display a list of errors like missing '</ul>' closing tags along with the line where the error occurs. I have to make 2 caveats: it *will* display a lot of warnings you can ignore *and*, if you validated your entire document, it would have pointed out that it lacks  '<head>' and '<title>' sections which are technically required for an HTML5 document.

 

w3c.jpg

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
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Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
7 of 13

Jennifer wrote, 'I'ma bout to sign up. I think I might mess with Ruby or something. I dunno.'

 

I'd like to hear how that goes. I started to go thru this online book, Learn Ruby The Hard Way, because I was curious about shopify which is built on Ruby with Rails, but then work got in the (hard) way. By the way, the online book is geared to non-developers so author insists on no copy/pasting exercises. I compromised by using editor auto-completion. Cat Wink

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
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Community Guru
John B Member Since: Feb 20, 2009
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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
9 of 13

@John K wrote:

Jennifer wrote, 'I'ma bout to sign up. I think I might mess with Ruby or something. I dunno.'

 

I'd like to hear how that goes. I started to go thru this online book, Learn Ruby The Hard Way, because I was curious about shopify which is built on Ruby with Rails, but then work got in the (hard) way. By the way, the online book is geared to non-developers so author insists on no copy/pasting exercises. I compromised by using editor auto-completion. Cat Wink


 

The only problem I have with these sites is that they only teach you the language but it's not real-world experience. Knowing the language is fine, but nothing gives you real experience like accidentally deploying a web.config with development credentials on a production site and watching everything come to a screeching halt because of your f-up, and then taking the heat and everyone scrambling to figure out what happen. Smiley Happy  

 

Or  sending marketing emails to thousands of people accidentally cuz the SQL Server stalled and when you restarted it the thousands of emails went out all at once when it should have been  a couple of dozen.

 

I've made some real fun screwups. lol  But what gives you that real experience is the anarchy involved in figuring out what happened and troubleshooting applications. That's where I feel like you don't get too much value except for very superficial understanding when you do books or online courses.

 

When someone asks me how I learned, I tell them to skip the books and the courses, come up with an application idea and go out and code it. It can be anything from a calculator to building a simple web page that says "Hi." You go through setting up your environment, building the code, troubleshooting and deployment. All of this has more value than just answering a few coding questions.

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Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
10 of 13

Tres cool! thanks John! 

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