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Re: Crazy Job Postings Part II

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
61 of 787

@Renata S wrote:

I just saw one for a "heavy editing proofreader." Possibly only the proofreaders will catch that one. 


 That was probably the same one who was looking for a vast proofreader!

 

ETA: Oops, sorry, I have been asleep at this party - go back a few pages Smiley Tongue

 

PS: In UK English a winky means something else entirely and a koozie could be a winky warmer (also UK) - I'm going back to sleep . . .

pandoraharper
Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
62 of 787

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

I just saw one for a "heavy editing proofreader." Possibly only the proofreaders will catch that one. 


 That was probably the same one who was looking for a vast proofreader!

 

ETA: Oops, sorry, I have been asleep at this party - go back a few pages Smiley Tongue

 

PS: In UK English a winky means something else entirely and a koozie could be a winky warmer (also UK) - I'm going back to sleep . . .


I don't EVEN want to ask.  But to clarify the koozie thing, it's a US term for can covers (that insulate, and/or can be used for marketing (logos, etc).

 

And koozie is a hack on the older, and not much used anymore word cozy, which in product terms referred mostly to teapot covers and occassionaly to cup covers (usually teacups). The picture I posted of a teapot cozy is actually like 5 years old. Most folks under 35 years old have probably never heard of a teapot cover.

renata101
Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
63 of 787

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

I just saw one for a "heavy editing proofreader." Possibly only the proofreaders will catch that one. 


 That was probably the same one who was looking for a vast proofreader!

 

ETA: Oops, sorry, I have been asleep at this party - go back a few pages Smiley Tongue

 

PS: In UK English a winky means something else entirely and a koozie could be a winky warmer (also UK) - I'm going back to sleep . . .


Was that on the US/UK What's the Difference test? According to Wikipedia and the BBC, "Winkie" (proper noun) was  an award-winning carrier pigeon, who could also have been quite cozy in the koozie. But I believe you're referring to that other thing (as in Wee Willie), aren't you?  Cat Wink

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
64 of 787

@Renata S wrote:

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

I just saw one for a "heavy editing proofreader." Possibly only the proofreaders will catch that one. 


 That was probably the same one who was looking for a vast proofreader!

 

ETA: Oops, sorry, I have been asleep at this party - go back a few pages Smiley Tongue

 

PS: In UK English a winky means something else entirely and a koozie could be a winky warmer (also UK) - I'm going back to sleep . . .


Was that on the US/UK What's the Difference test? According to Wikipedia and the BBC, "Winkie" (proper noun) was also a carrier pigeon, who could also have been quite cozy in the koozie. But I believe you're referring to that other thing (as in Wee Willy), aren't you?  Cat Wink


 Smiley Wink

pandoraharper
Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
65 of 787

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

I just saw one for a "heavy editing proofreader." Possibly only the proofreaders will catch that one. 


 That was probably the same one who was looking for a vast proofreader!

 

ETA: Oops, sorry, I have been asleep at this party - go back a few pages Smiley Tongue

 

PS: In UK English a winky means something else entirely and a koozie could be a winky warmer (also UK) - I'm going back to sleep . . .


Was that on the US/UK What's the Difference test? According to Wikipedia and the BBC, "Winkie" (proper noun) was also a carrier pigeon, who could also have been quite cozy in the koozie. But I believe you're referring to that other thing (as in Wee Willy), aren't you?  Cat Wink


 Smiley Wink


 Oh lawd, save me now. <cough> I admit it. For once in my life, my mind was in the gutter.

ravi_iitian
Community Guru
Ravindra B Member Since: Sep 27, 2015
66 of 787

Job: Re-write some old romance novels - approximately 8000 - 9000 words long. ALL words in the story to be rewritten, so that no sentence is the same (changing only one or two words not good enough). 

 

Budget: $20

"Certa bonum certamen"
renata101
Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
67 of 787

@Ravindra B wrote:

Job: Re-write some old romance novels - approximately 8000 - 9000 words long. ALL words in the story to be rewritten, so that no sentence is the same (changing only one or two words not good enough). 

 

Budget: $20


Uh, rewrite all words in the story? Does it say what the difference is between that and writing a new one?  

I wonder if these guys from MIT might be able to develop the romance novel version of the SciGen Automatic Paper Generator. Apparently, they got some of the papers they generated with this published. I think the same principal would probably work for romance novels. 
https://pdos.csail.mit.edu/archive/scigen/

renata101
Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
68 of 787

Has anyone ever heard of the "Christian and Amish romance genre"? I didn't realize this was a niche in niche publishing.

pandoraharper
Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
69 of 787

@Renata S wrote:

Has anyone ever heard of the "Christian and Amish romance genre"? I didn't realize this was a niche in niche publishing.


 You are joking, right? Please say your joking!

 

(I bet she isn't. Romance genres have changed (and gone in some crazy directions) in recent years).

 

Note: I do not read this genre, but I do pay attention to the Fiction industry in general.

renata101
Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
70 of 787

@Pandora H wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

Has anyone ever heard of the "Christian and Amish romance genre"? I didn't realize this was a niche in niche publishing.


 You are joking, right? Please say your joking!

 

(I bet she isn't. Romance genres have changed (and gone in some crazy directions) in recent years).

 

Note: I do not read this genre, but I do pay attention to the Fiction industry in general.


I'm pretty sure this is what I saw, although I was slugging down copious amounts of espresso this morning. 

Do you think I could make something like this up? 

Actually, I can understand the need for alternatives to bestseller offerings like "50 Shades" in certain spiritual/religious communities. I think it might be that the e-book niches are getting much more refined, although I haven't yet seen a posting for Amish werewolf or vampire fiction. 


 

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