Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Crazy Job Postings Part II

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
51 of 653

@Renata S wrote:

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

I just saw one for a "heavy editing proofreader." Possibly only the proofreaders will catch that one. 


 That was probably the same one who was looking for a vast proofreader!

 

ETA: Oops, sorry, I have been asleep at this party - go back a few pages Smiley Tongue

 

PS: In UK English a winky means something else entirely and a koozie could be a winky warmer (also UK) - I'm going back to sleep . . .


Was that on the US/UK What's the Difference test? According to Wikipedia and the BBC, "Winkie" (proper noun) was also a carrier pigeon, who could also have been quite cozy in the koozie. But I believe you're referring to that other thing (as in Wee Willy), aren't you?  Cat Wink


 Smiley Wink

Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
52 of 653

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

@Nichola L wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

I just saw one for a "heavy editing proofreader." Possibly only the proofreaders will catch that one. 


 That was probably the same one who was looking for a vast proofreader!

 

ETA: Oops, sorry, I have been asleep at this party - go back a few pages Smiley Tongue

 

PS: In UK English a winky means something else entirely and a koozie could be a winky warmer (also UK) - I'm going back to sleep . . .


Was that on the US/UK What's the Difference test? According to Wikipedia and the BBC, "Winkie" (proper noun) was also a carrier pigeon, who could also have been quite cozy in the koozie. But I believe you're referring to that other thing (as in Wee Willy), aren't you?  Cat Wink


 Smiley Wink


 Oh lawd, save me now. <cough> I admit it. For once in my life, my mind was in the gutter.

Community Guru
Ravindra B Member Since: Sep 27, 2015
53 of 653

Job: Re-write some old romance novels - approximately 8000 - 9000 words long. ALL words in the story to be rewritten, so that no sentence is the same (changing only one or two words not good enough). 

 

Budget: $20

"Certa bonum certamen"
Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
54 of 653

@Ravindra B wrote:

Job: Re-write some old romance novels - approximately 8000 - 9000 words long. ALL words in the story to be rewritten, so that no sentence is the same (changing only one or two words not good enough). 

 

Budget: $20


Uh, rewrite all words in the story? Does it say what the difference is between that and writing a new one?  

I wonder if these guys from MIT might be able to develop the romance novel version of the SciGen Automatic Paper Generator. Apparently, they got some of the papers they generated with this published. I think the same principal would probably work for romance novels. 
https://pdos.csail.mit.edu/archive/scigen/

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
55 of 653

Has anyone ever heard of the "Christian and Amish romance genre"? I didn't realize this was a niche in niche publishing.

Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
56 of 653

@Renata S wrote:

Has anyone ever heard of the "Christian and Amish romance genre"? I didn't realize this was a niche in niche publishing.


 You are joking, right? Please say your joking!

 

(I bet she isn't. Romance genres have changed (and gone in some crazy directions) in recent years).

 

Note: I do not read this genre, but I do pay attention to the Fiction industry in general.

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
57 of 653

@Pandora H wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

Has anyone ever heard of the "Christian and Amish romance genre"? I didn't realize this was a niche in niche publishing.


 You are joking, right? Please say your joking!

 

(I bet she isn't. Romance genres have changed (and gone in some crazy directions) in recent years).

 

Note: I do not read this genre, but I do pay attention to the Fiction industry in general.


I'm pretty sure this is what I saw, although I was slugging down copious amounts of espresso this morning. 

Do you think I could make something like this up? 

Actually, I can understand the need for alternatives to bestseller offerings like "50 Shades" in certain spiritual/religious communities. I think it might be that the e-book niches are getting much more refined, although I haven't yet seen a posting for Amish werewolf or vampire fiction. 


 

Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
58 of 653

@Renata S wrote:

@Pandora H wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

Has anyone ever heard of the "Christian and Amish romance genre"? I didn't realize this was a niche in niche publishing.


 You are joking, right? Please say your joking!

 

(I bet she isn't. Romance genres have changed (and gone in some crazy directions) in recent years).

 

Note: I do not read this genre, but I do pay attention to the Fiction industry in general.


I'm pretty sure this is what I saw, although I was slugging down copious amounts of espresso this morning. 

Do you think I could make something like this up? 

Actually, I can understand the need for alternatives to bestseller offerings like "50 Shades" in certain spiritual/religious communities. I think it might be that the e-book niches are getting much more refined, although I haven't yet seen a posting for Amish werewolf or vampire fiction. 


 No, I did not think you made this up. I was just like wow, seriously? Not to mention, Amish culture is very anti-anything that does not fall into their own little religious corner. Which is incredibly conservative, when compared to mainstream American culture.

 

So, needless to say, Amish people are not going to even read this sort of material. For that matter, I doubt Christans would either, for similiar reasons. So who in the heck is the target audience for this sort of niche, I wonder.

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
59 of 653

@Pandora H wrote:

 


 No, I did not think you made this up. I was just like wow, seriously? Not to mention, Amish culture is very anti-anything that does not fall into their own little religious corner. Which is incredibly conservative, when compared to mainstream American culture.

 

So, needless to say, Amish people are not going to even read this sort of material. For that matter, I doubt Christans would either, for similiar reasons. So who in the heck is the target audience for this sort of niche, I wonder.


 I'm not sure who the target audience for Amish romance would be other than Amish people, but it's possible that it might have broader appeal than anyone would assume. It might have some sort of cross-over appeal for groups that have similar values about marriage. Maybe if you have an Amish author, then this might appeal to Amish readers (although I really wonder if sitting around reading romance novels is something that's particularly encouraged by this community). Or it might even appeal to non-Amish readers who are looking for something a little different, like an exploration of a different culture. It's hard to know. Maybe it's just in an early experimental stage. It just caught my eye because I never would have imagined a niche like that existing.

 

Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
60 of 653

One of my best friends is ex-Amish. (She is featured on the PBS series about leaving the Amish.) In addition, I was raised in an area where there are many Amish and Mennonite families. I happen to be fairly familiar with the culture -- about as familiar as a non-Amish can be, without being married to an ex-Amish or being a scholar.

 

The Amish are discouraged from reading fiction of any sort. Romance books would be considerd to be a waste of time.

 

Amish romance novels are definitely a "thing," however. The target audience is an older group of females who are looking for "Little House on the Prairie"-style books with a dash more adult content, but definitely rated no more than PG. The typical request is for "sweet Amish romance writing."

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS