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$$$ Expert level for $5 to translate 200 pages

Ace Contributor
Mina F Member Since: Jan 18, 2019
1 of 21

Ok so I decided to post this in the Coffee Break section as, if I didn't misunderstand, it would suit such a comic, not comic post, which is actually about a job I saw today:

 

I hope posting the job posting's details is not against the Community Guide Lines:

 

**edited for Community Guidelines**

 

-The job has 5-10 proposals last time checked and as mentioned: experts are required for a fixed price of $5. Is this even legitimate? Smiley Very Happy

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
2 of 21

Mina, some clients put in $5 as a placeholder, so they expect freelancers to change it to something else, and some of the freelancers who applied probably bid with a much higher budget for the job. But the client might really expect the job to be done for $5, so the only way to know for sure is to apply and ask the client.

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
3 of 21

I'm not a translator so not equipped to assess, but if everything else about the post is reasonable but the budget, then I would assume that's a placeholder. If I were interested, I would submit a proposal with my own placeholder budget and specify all time and scope parameters that my budget was based on.

Ace Contributor
Mina F Member Since: Jan 18, 2019
4 of 21

Aha, okay, maybe. But I think it's still misleading, I mean I would still not risk losing connects attempting to propose a much higher price if I'm not sure what his maximum expectations are, otherwise what's the purpose of filling the "budget" part!

Active Member
Scott S Member Since: Feb 10, 2019
5 of 21

I learned something here and I agree with Mina. When I see an unreasonable budget # for a job I could submit a proposal for I decide against it  so I don't waste a connection. And, I personally a leave the job description with the impression that people wanting work done have no respect for the people they want to hire. My direct experience here is someone actually threw a whole $20.00 in escro for me to accept his job that he decided would take 10 minutes. It took at least that to read his detailed request for an idea what he was asking. I had to reject that offer. Bottom line, losing a connection without any feedback on whether I was even in the ballpark isn't a great experience.

Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
6 of 21

Mina F wrote:

Ok so I decided to post this in the Coffee Break section as, if I didn't misunderstand, it would suit such a comic, not comic post, which is actually about a job I saw today:

 

I hope posting the job posting's details is not against the Community Guide Lines:

 

**edited for Community Guidelines**

 

-The job has 5-10 proposals last time checked and as mentioned: experts are required for a fixed price of $5. Is this even legitimate? Smiley Very Happy


As said before, this is probably just a placeholder. This said if  you bid hire, you should also hope that no Talent Specialist gets in your way.

 

I would check the clients history. What is the average hourly rate? That is often the biggest help you can get.

Community Guru
Anthony H Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
7 of 21

Last time I bid $5 on something, the client jumped on it like a seagull on a dumpster. When I told him it was a placeholder bid, he (rightfully, I figure) gave me all kinds of s h rhymes with idiot. (Ok, well, it doesn't rhyme with idiot.) 

Why? Because I was wasting his time.

For my money, making excuses for a client doing that is just lame-oh. When a client puts down $5 on a job, I don't care what it is, he or she is saying "I want the lowest bid possible for this job." You don't have to be Sigmund Freud to figure that out. 

Now, when I put $5 on a bid, I say in my cover letter, "That's a place holder." Otherwise, I'm just playing games and the client has every right to accuse me of wasting his or her time. Goes both ways, as I see it.

In fact, I just saw a job listed as "expert" pay in which the job poster proudly barked that he or she was paying $1 for 100 words. I submitted a bid, actually. My proposal said exactly this: 

"Do the math. Expert pay? Wow. Is anyone falling for that? If so, hire them. Doing so will get you both out of my way. Thanks."


Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
8 of 21

Anthony H wrote:

Last time I bid $5 on something, the client jumped on it like a seagull on a dumpster. When I told him it was a placeholder bid, he (rightfully, I figure) gave me all kinds of s h rhymes with idiot. (Ok, well, it doesn't rhyme with idiot.) 

Why? Because I was wasting his time.

For my money, making excuses for a client doing that is just lame-oh. When a client puts down $5 on a job, I don't care what it is, he or she is saying "I want the lowest bid possible for this job." You don't have to be Sigmund Freud to figure that out. 

Now, when I put $5 on a bid, I say in my cover letter, "That's a place holder." Otherwise, I'm just playing games and the client has every right to accuse me of wasting his or her time. Goes both ways, as I see it.

In fact, I just saw a job listed as "expert" pay in which the job poster proudly barked that he or she was paying $1 for 100 words. I submitted a bid, actually. My proposal said exactly this: 

"Do the math. Expert pay? Wow. Is anyone falling for that? If so, hire them. Doing so will get you both out of my way. Thanks."

I said something similar to client once. He came back asking how much I wanted per 100 words. I said $15. He said OK, and I'm still working with him nearly four years later, but now at $18 per 100 words. 


 

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The problem with silver linings is that they always come with dark clouds attached - RB
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
9 of 21

Anthony H wrote:


In fact, I just saw a job listed as "expert" pay in which the job poster proudly barked that he or she was paying $1 for 100 words. I submitted a bid, actually. My proposal said exactly this: 

"Do the math. Expert pay? Wow. Is anyone falling for that? If so, hire them. Doing so will get you both out of my way. Thanks."


Seriously?

I've never understood why freelancers waste their time and the client's time for no purpose other than to insult clients.

I quote my price. They can take it, or they can leave it. No skin off my nose. I pay little or no attention to the budget unless it aligns with my rates anyway.

 

To actually apply just to be rude?

I don't get it.

 

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
10 of 21

A freelancer who is rude or insulting to clients is doing harm to the Upwork platform as a whole.

I would prefer to see such freelancers removed from the platform.

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