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Gardening time

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Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
1 of 59

Here is my future tomato crop - right now, my darlings are enjoying the comfort of my officeIMG_20180504_203400 (2).jpg

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Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
2 of 59

Luce, they're lovely.  

Thanks for reminding me that I need to get my basil bins primed and ready to plant. You can never have too much basil. 

 

Plus, I mananged to overwinter my rosemaryr this year without killing it!

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Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
3 of 59

Ooh Luce, I'm about to plant mine out. Is it too early? I bought a couple of canteloupe plants this year . . .

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Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
4 of 59

@Nichola L wrote:

Ooh Luce, I'm about to plant mine out. Is it too early? I bought a couple of canteloupe plants this year . . .


 Nicola, thanks for asking the Normandy garden specialist. I think the nights are still a bit too cool, unless you have a greenhouse to protect them.

 

This is an excellent advice an old gardener gave me: let them grow rather tall inside, then plant them, covering part of the stem in dirt. They will grow more roots, and therefore they will be more sturdy.

 

Have you started yours from seeds of have you bought them?

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Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
5 of 59

@Renata S wrote:

Luce, they're lovely.  

Thanks for reminding me that I need to get my basil bins primed and ready to plant. You can never have too much basil. 

 

Plus, I mananged to overwinter my rosemaryr this year without killing it!


 They are lovely indeed. I'm very proud of them. I have had a hard time growing basil. What is your method?

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Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
6 of 59

@Luce N wrote:

@Renata S wrote:

Luce, they're lovely.  

Thanks for reminding me that I need to get my basil bins primed and ready to plant. You can never have too much basil. 

 

Plus, I mananged to overwinter my rosemaryr this year without killing it!


 They are lovely indeed. I'm very proud of them. I have had a hard time growing basil. What is your method?


Method? I put the seed in the dirt in a pot inside. I transfer the pot out onto my balcony when it's warm enough. (Is that a method? LOL). If I forget to do this, I buy plants at the market.  I'm a very no-frills gardener with a short attention span. I don't grow much that's complicated. With houseplants I'm a little more involved. 

I think climate might be a bigger factor than method. I don't know what the climate is like in Normandy. Montreal has a good climate for basil for some strange reason (successful basil cultivation might be why there's a reasonably large Italian population here). It's hot here in the summer and often humid. Basil loves heat and can handle direct sun. I just put it out in a balcony box, water it daily and feed it once every week or two. I treat it the same way I treat the flowering annuals. 

Also, I'm close to a market that stocks really good seeds (and plants later in the season). That seems to to make a difference. The seeds seem to sprout faster if they're "fresh." Genovese basil works really well and also Red Rubin.  I've also grown Thai Basil.  All of them do fine in plastic or clay pots. You can plant them in deeper pots, but they don't really need to be than 15 cm (6 inches). That's as deep as my planter boxes are.  Also, sometimes with herbs, you don't want the soil to be too rich, so you can reuse soil that something else was planted in last year.

I hope that helps. Maybe you're being too precise?

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Mary W Member Since: Nov 10, 2014
7 of 59

I have mint that I bought two weeks ago.  Have already had to repot it and am enjoying far too many mint juleps. I also have purple Thai basil that has contributed to several pizzas and bruschettas already.  I do love living in a relatively hot, humid climate...

 

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Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
8 of 59

@Renata S wrote:

@Luce N wrote:

 They are lovely indeed. I'm very proud of them. I have had a hard time growing basil. What is your method?

Method? I put the seed in the dirt in a pot inside. I transfer the pot out onto my balcony when it's warm enough. (Is that a method? LOL). If I forget to do this, I buy plants at the market.  I'm a very no-frills gardener with a short attention span. I don't grow much that's complicated. With houseplants I'm a little more involved. 

I think climate might be a bigger factor than method. I don't know what the climate is like in Normandy. Montreal has a good climate for basil for some strange reason (successful basil cultivation might be why there's a reasonably large Italian population here). It's hot here in the summer and often humid. Basil loves heat and can handle direct sun. I just put it out in a balcony box, water it daily and feed it once every week or two. I treat it the same way I treat the flowering annuals. 


 Renata, you've convinced me, I'm nearly ready to start. Right in front of me are two packets that were sent to me as a present by the company I buy my seeds from. As you said compost might be a problem, I'm getting some dirt from my garden this afternoon, voilà!

IMG_20180506_124754.jpg

 

 

I'm ecstatic because the coriander seeds I planted on my terrace 2 weeks ago are finally sprouting. And the seeds were seeds I took from last year's coriander I had. 

 

The weather in Normandy is a bit like the weather in London or Paris. Grey, wet in winter, but rather pleasant in summer. Where I live, we are close enough to the coast to get a lot of breeze. How about Montreal, when it's not covered in snow?

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Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
9 of 59

@Luce N wrote:




I think climate might be a bigger factor than method. I don't know what the climate is like in Normandy. Montreal has a good climate for basil for some strange reason (successful basil cultivation might be why there's a reasonably large Italian population here). It's hot here in the summer and often humid. Basil loves heat and can handle direct sun. I just put it out in a balcony box, water it daily and feed it once every week or two. I treat it the same way I treat the flowering annuals. 

 Renata, you've convinced me, I'm nearly ready to start. Right in front of me are two packets that were sent to me as a present by the company I buy my seeds from. As you said compost might be a problem, I'm getting some dirt from my garden this afternoon, voilà!

IMG_20180506_124754.jpg

 

 

I'm ecstatic because the coriander seeds I planted on my terrace 2 weeks ago are finally sprouting. And the seeds were seeds I took from last year's coriander I had. 

 

The weather in Normandy is a bit like the weather in London or Paris. Grey, wet in winter, but rather pleasant in summer. Where I live, we are close enough to the coast to get a lot of breeze. How about Montreal, when it's not covered in snow?


 Infinintely breezy. Montreal weather has always seemed to me like something that's controlled by a dysfunctional government agency or a omniscient being on the verge of a nervous breakdown. It's kind of like mood swing central, but this keeps conversations flowing as there is something for just about everyone to complain about here weatherwise (too hot, too cold, not hot enough, and much too humid are some common complaints), so it's a great distraction from the politics and the medical services. Also, since it is a fairly cosmopolitain city, it is likely that everyone is complaining about something different. We do have loads of great summer arts and music festivals to experience (some of which are neither overheated nor rained on)! 

For our purposes (gardening), the Montreal climate is one I call build and blow. It gets hot,  the clouds gather, it gets really humid and sticky and horrible, you get spectacular thunderstorms and brief but torrential downpours, everything cools down, and then you do that all over again.  

I have no idea why basil would do well in this climate (or anything else for that matter). I think it's because evenings are generally warm.  That said, everyone has loads of gorgeous flowers on their balconies during the summer. Geraniums do really well. And I've seen magnolia trees blooming here in the spring, which I didn't think would survive the winters.

According to this government chart, we are in zone 5a to 5b. I hope this answers your question.  Give it a try with the regular dirt. 

https://gardenmaking.com/plant-hardiness-zones-changing/

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Rifat AL M Member Since: Jul 9, 2017
10 of 59

I keep wondering about plants. They grow just with some soils and water.

Do we have to put soils again/refertile when they fully grow?

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