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Gardening time

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Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
11 of 59

My basil "sits" on the fishtank, stems through the feeding hole, roots in the water. It seems to love it!

 

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Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
12 of 59

@Rifat AL M wrote:

I keep wondering about plants. They grow just with some soils and water.

Do we have to put soils again/refertile when they fully grow?


 I have been calling myself the "compost queen" for many years, now. I compost the parts of fruit and vegetable I don't need (leaves, peel). I use the compost, for example, as soil for the plants I grow from seeds. The tomatoes of the photo are growing in home made compost. They love it and I have a lot of fun with gardening.

I also try to use "green fertilizer" in my garden plot, that is plants that grow very fasts and that you later bury in the ground after a while, so that they give some nutrient to the soil.

Do you have a garden?

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Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
13 of 59

Petra an Renatta, what do you use your basil for?

 

As I sort of failed when trying to grow basil, I buy some every year, right now it's inside, behind another window. I mostly use it in salads but I'm sure I could do more. I need inspiration.

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Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
14 of 59

@Luce N wrote:

Petra an Renatta, what do you use your basil for?

 

As I sort of failed when trying to grow basil, I buy some every year, right now it's inside, behind another window. I mostly use it in salads but I'm sure I could do more. I need inspiration.


 __________________

While Renata and Petra are thinking up their ideas: 

I put basil in my salad dressing and tomato sauce, tomato soup - everything tomato! Tomato salad with mozzarella (go expensive and buy buffalo mozzarella). It makes a mean pesto, which is basil (masses of it), pine nuts and olive oil mixed together (ground together), that goes onto pasta (fresh if you can be bothered to make it) and with fresh grated parmesan (you can get really nice parmesan at Lidls). I also make (or used to make) a great soup with basil - it's a Provençal recipe - I'll have to find it. It takes two days! (ETA: to make not to find - that might take longer)

 

Now I am feeling quite faint from hunger . . .

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Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
15 of 59

@Nichola L wrote:

@Luce N wrote:

Petra an Renatta, what do you use your basil for?

 

As I sort of failed when trying to grow basil, I buy some every year, right now it's inside, behind another window. I mostly use it in salads but I'm sure I could do more. I need inspiration.


 __________________

While Renata and Petra are thinking up their ideas: 

I put basil in my salad dressing and tomato sauce, tomato soup - everything tomato! Tomato salad with mozzarella (go expensive and buy buffalo mozzarella). It makes a mean pesto, which is basil (masses of it), pine nuts and olive oil mixed together (ground together), that goes onto pasta (fresh if you can be bothered to make it) and with fresh grated parmesan (you can get really nice parmesan at Lidls). I also make (or used to make) a great soup with basil - it's a Provençal recipe - I'll have to find it. It takes two days! (ETA: to make not to find - that might take longer)

 

Now I am feeling quite faint from hunger . . .


 

Faint from hunger? So am I after reading your post! I didn't expect someone "normal" to make their own pesto. Can you tell me more about it? Looking forward for your tomato soup recipe.

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Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
16 of 59

@Nichola L wrote:

@Luce N wrote:

Petra an Renatta, what do you use your basil for?

 

As I sort of failed when trying to grow basil, I buy some every year, right now it's inside, behind another window. I mostly use it in salads but I'm sure I could do more. I need inspiration.


 __________________

While Renata and Petra are thinking up their ideas: 

I put basil in my salad dressing and tomato sauce, tomato soup - everything tomato! Tomato salad with mozzarella (go expensive and buy buffalo mozzarella). It makes a mean pesto, which is basil (masses of it), pine nuts and olive oil mixed together (ground together), that goes onto pasta (fresh if you can be bothered to make it) and with fresh grated parmesan (you can get really nice parmesan at Lidls). I also make (or used to make) a great soup with basil - it's a Provençal recipe - I'll have to find it. It takes two days! (ETA: to make not to find - that might take longer)

 

Now I am feeling quite faint from hunger . . .


I feel faint with hunger as well.

I think most often I make pesto, but you can use pesto in just about anything. My friends do a pasta with pesto and sautéd garlic and vegetables (onions + bell peppers + mushrooms + sundried tomatoes, if you like them + anything else you think might be exciting).  Then you top that with fresh grated parmesan or romano (or asiago).

Another recipe that's nice with pesto is very informal portabello mushroom burgers (portabello mushrooms grilled with a cheese like emmental or gruyere)  served on crusty rolls. You can mix the pesto with some good mayonaise and put it on the rolls and serve with tomatoes and lettuce. Then just have that with a salad and a nice vinagrette. Basil is also great on pizzas (just throw the leaves on top).  I like pasta with seafood and basil as well.

There's a Thai basil + seafood on noodles dish that I'm able to get locally from a Thai place in town. So sometimes I try to make a home version. Thai basil also goes really well with eggplant and/or chicken. 

I used to do a nice fruit-infused blackberry vinegar with basil (you can find amazing blackberries on the Canadian West Coast if you are willing to risk yourself to thorn attacks--they're almost like port, very rich and dark).

You can also freeze pesto for fall and winter consumption, just leave the cheese out. I think some people just freeze the basil leaves whole or chopped as well.  


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Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
17 of 59

@Luce N wrote:

@Rifat AL M wrote:

I keep wondering about plants. They grow just with some soils and water.

Do we have to put soils again/refertile when they fully grow?


 I have been calling myself the "compost queen" for many years, now. I compost the parts of fruit and vegetable I don't need (leaves, peel). I use the compost, for example, as soil for the plants I grow from seeds. The tomatoes of the photo are growing in home made compost.


 Hi Luce,  Compost is fairly rich. That might be what's going wrong with your basil-growing efforts. I don't know for sure, but I've heard herbs do well in soils that aren't too nutrient rich. 

Something else I can recommend for the no-frills or early careeer gardener is nasturtiums. They're easy to grow and you get lots of colour.  They grow in the worst kinds of soil. And you like, you can also eat the flowers.  An acquired taste, I think, but they look really wonderful in salads.  

Screen Shot 2018-05-05 at 7.42.17 PM.png

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Irene B Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
18 of 59

I live on the plateau in South Africa - far from my Cape Town Mediterranean Climate roots...and getting to become a good gardener up here has taken me quite some time. The climate is totally different - summers are hot, humid - and thunderous. Been washed a way a time or two (well, not quite literally) and had an enormous old tree standing on the pavement break in half due to a lightning strike. That decimated the whole front garden! BUT....you redo...and its perking up again.

 

I too, am a lover of all things tomato and herb. My herbs tend to die during winter. You might thinking being relatively near one of the tropics ensures year-round warmth, wouldn't you? Nothing is further from the truth! Being quite high above sea levels, winters are darn cold! Sub-zero temperatures are not unheard of. Some of my plants get a 'winter blanket' to survive, while all autumn leaves get thrown between plants for mulch and to keep in some ground heat. Luckily I have tons of trees - and tons of leaves. Compost aint no problem here, baby!

 

BUT>>tomatoes!!! That is something I have tons of...all throughout the garden. All I do is, when I have any tomato salad leftovers, is to toss them in a bare patch somewhere and sure as nuts - a few tomato plants will start growing there. LOVE it. ONE thing I need to add to my soil though, besides the copious amounts of compost that I do just to get rid of it and make space for another batch, is Epsom salts. This is an OLD garden that I am revamping, and the soil is quite leached. My roses, which I know well (mamma was an avid rose gardener - and knew each rose by its name), tend to be my yardstick for what the soil needs. For rose lovers - when those beauties dont bloom like they should, try adding some epsom salts to the soil around them - about two tablespoons per rose bush every two weeks during the flowering season. HA! The difference is amazing!

 

My soft herbs like bazil I cannot plant in direct sunlight in summer. It is just too darn hot. They tend to thrive in the semi-shade, though, where they get lots of morning sun. 

 

Having said all this - and looking out the window - do I finish up that article - do I finish up painting the kitchen - or do I go outside and sweep up the leaves on the paths outside and go do some more mulching as the 'real' cold is just around the corner?

 

Decisions, decisons!

 

SOooo btw....busy on my first coffee...not taking responsibility for any typos and other errors in this post. I'm only coherent after coffee nr 2. It is early yet!

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Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
19 of 59

Last spring, Renata and Petra encouraged me to try to grow basil, and here it is: I've got some basil in 5 different spots. It's doing well, and delicious. Who else here enjoys gardening and has some photos to share?IMG_20180822_115047.jpg

 

IMG_20180822_115102.jpg

 

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Martina P Member Since: Jul 11, 2018
20 of 59

you put in into the right spot, too, because basil and tomatoes are "good neighbors" and promote each others growth. 

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