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Here's how to get the full attention of your freelancer.

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Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
31 of 54

John B wrote:

...avoid "well don't do that it is a terrible idea!".


I look forward to the opportunity, should it ever present itself.

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Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
32 of 54

À propos of not much at all, but given that this thread has made me think of offering good advice for freelancers, based on my own experience...

 

Early on in my career, I found that I was making the following mistakes, and I urge freelancers to avoid this constellation of errors:

 

Early on, I had a tendency to veil a rather smug, self-satisfied message in a light-hearted tone that I thought would fool clients and colleagues alike. I assumed that a use of polysyllabic words and complex phrasing would convince my interlocutors of my intellectual superiority and of the value of my content. Indeed, I rather thought of myself as a glib Oscar Wilde type, throwing off bon mots (actually, should be "mots bons," if one is showing off) with a light verbal touch, but to devastating effect. I considered my writing style to be quite clever, rather than heavy-handed and tedious. I might even have flattered myself by allowing myself to go where others [now] tread, on the theory that I would keenly and mortally wound my imagined "opponents" by means of my lightning rapier strokes, along the lines of: "Guess you won't mess with me any more, you foul ruffians who have now been squarely put into your tiny places!"

 

As a corollary to my former style -- one that combined nearly incomprehensible thickets of prose with overweening arrogance -- I assumed that everyone looked to me as an expert on whatever I chose to pontificate upon. I had declared myself to be an expert, and thus I surely was one! And I demonstrated my excellence with each exquisite written offering I produced for the almost-deserving masses. Sure, a few hoi and several polloi disdained my brilliance, but that was no matter. No one could touch me for experience, skills, and just all-around know-it-all-ness. And any complaints about my unnecessarily complicated style clearly emanated from those who were just too danged stupid to understand my rhetorical flourishes. It is, after all, not the job of the WRITER to make his or her words understandable to the reader. If readers could not parse my sentences, that was THEIR problem, not MINE! Do schools no longer teach sentence diagramming?

 

I constantly congratulated myself on the Good Deeds I was doing, by sharing my knowledge with others -- the Great Unwashed, who invariably understood less of the world than I. (Until, that is, I shared with those benighted individuals my knowledge and insights.)

 

However... That was all early in my career.

 

Let me leave out the middle part of my career. Let us simply refer to that part as "Chapters 21 through 43, in Which Our Heroine Encounters Reality and Has Some Actual Sense Knocked Into Her Ego-Riddled and Obnoxious Noggin."

 

My advice now, to all freelancers (and clients may also take this for what it is worth), is this:  Do NOT behave as I have described myself doing.

 

Just. Don't.

 

I was insufferable.

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Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
33 of 54

Janean L wrote:

À propos of not much at all, but given that this thread has made me think of offering good advice for freelancers, based on my own experience...

 

Early on in my career, I found that I was making the following mistakes, and I urge freelancers to avoid this constellation of errors:

 

Early on, I had a tendency to veil a rather smug, self-satisfied message in a light-hearted tone that I thought would fool clients and colleagues alike. I assumed that a use of polysyllabic words and complex phrasing would convince my interlocutors of my intellectual superiority and of the value of my content. Indeed, I rather thought of myself as a glib Oscar Wilde type, throwing off bon mots (actually, should be "mots bons," if one is showing off) with a light verbal touch, but to devastating effect. I considered my writing style to be quite clever, rather than heavy-handed and tedious. I might even have flattered myself by allowing myself to go where others [now] tread, on the theory that I would keenly and mortally wound my imagined "opponents" by means of my lightning rapier strokes, along the lines of: "Guess you won't mess with me any more, you foul ruffians who have now been squarely put into your tiny places!"

 

As a corollary to my former style -- one that combined nearly incomprehensible thickets of prose with overweening arrogance -- I assumed that everyone looked to me as an expert on whatever I chose to pontificate upon. I had declared myself to be an expert, and thus I surely was one! And I demonstrated my excellence with each exquisite written offering I produced for the almost-deserving masses. Sure, a few hoi and several polloi disdained my brilliance, but that was no matter. No one could touch me for experience, skills, and just all-around know-it-all-ness. And any complaints about my unnecessarily complicated style clearly emanated from those who were just too danged stupid to understand my rhetorical flourishes. It is, after all, not the job of the WRITER to make his or her words understandable to the reader. If readers could not parse my sentences, that was THEIR problem, not MINE! Do schools no longer teach sentence diagramming?

 

I constantly congratulated myself on the Good Deeds I was doing, by sharing my knowledge with others -- the Great Unwashed, who invariably understood less of the world than I. (Until, that is, I shared with those benighted individuals my knowledge and insights.)

 

However... That was all early in my career.

 

Let me leave out the middle part of my career. Let us simply refer to that part as "Chapters 21 through 43, in Which Our Heroine Encounters Reality and Has Some Actual Sense Knocked Into Her Ego-Riddled and Obnoxious Noggin."

 

My advice now, to all freelancers (and clients may also take this for what it is worth), is this:  Do NOT behave as I have described myself doing.

 

Just. Don't.

 

I was insufferable.


Now THAT was a master class in writing, ladies and gentlemen!

 

I hope that you will even accept a compliment from someone who is both a hoi and a polloi. We're not worthy. ;-)

 

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Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
34 of 54

Awww, shucks, Christine -- you greatly overstate the case (re "masterclass.")  But I thank you wholeheartedly, nonetheless!

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Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
35 of 54

Janean L wrote:

Awww, shucks, Christine -- you greatly overstate the case (re "masterclass.")  But I thank you wholeheartedly, nonetheless!


I must agree with Christine. However, I fear the message contained in this confession will be totally lost and/or wasted on its intended recipient. Then again, some mentees might pay proper attention to its message, which is perhaps the best any of us could hope for.  

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Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
36 of 54

Janean L wrote:

Awww, shucks, Christine -- you greatly overstate the case (re "masterclass.")  But I thank you wholeheartedly, nonetheless!


Not one bit, my friend, not one bit!

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Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
37 of 54

As a hiring client who works almost exclusively with newcomers - here are some recommendations to consider in your work with your newcomer.

 

Consider them to be in as much a learning mode as you are (in developing the relationship and figuring out 'how to work together'.)

- Freelance work delivery is a specialization that can take years to master.  One must usually deliver many projects and make a few mistakes to figure out best practices. 

 

Put the newcomer into a delivery "box".  This is a term used in professional consulting, and not meant to be diminishing.  A delivery box is a tightly sealed set of requirements, work requests, and deliverables.

- I recommend a scoping document of one-half to one page, which is check-box style. 

- Then, when the newcomer has hit their marks, delivery is practically guaranteed to be judged a success


Free up time a couple times a week to communicate with your newcomer.  Project owner to project delivery resource connectivity is a top three project success factor.

- Upwork provides a video conference facility.  Be proactive, schedule the meetings from your end, and work from the delivery definition worksheet.

 

Realize that newcomers may experience a state of darn-near-fear.  They are trying to gain the scores necessary to become a rising talent and, later, a top contractor. This process literally impacts their ability to win work and create revenue for themselves.

- Each of their project scores are vital to them.  The concern applied to what score they will receive may not be stated.  It will be felt.

- Speak to them about the JSS score and that you understand it is important to them.

 

These will help you get the best out of your newcomer - and, for that matter - all freelancers you engage.

 

On-topic comments are encouraged.

 

John.

 

 

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Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
38 of 54

John B wrote:

 

- Speak to them about the JSS score and that you understand it is important to them.


People, do not follow this "advice" with a professional freelancer or even with someone who is a total newbie!

 

Just don't. First, JSS manipulation, which is what this can lead to, is not allowed by the TOS of this platform. It may have your account closed. Second, showing your freelancers that you have their JSS in your hands, which is basically what OP is suggesting, is an ugly management strategy. Very ugly. Actually do not patronize them or they will slam the door on you.

 

You will find actual useful hiring tips here: Hiring Resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Highlighted
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
39 of 54

“Consider them to be in as much a learning mode as you are (in developing the relationship and figuring out 'how to work together'.)
“- Freelance work delivery is a specialization that can take years to master. One must usually deliver many projects and make a few mistakes to figure out best practices.”

Nope. You want a freelancer who enters this business model as an ace deliverer of the services you need. Why else are you here? If a freelancer can’t deliver quality work on time, you’re wasting your money; if you have to handhold and teach them how to run their business, you’re wasting your time (= money).

My learning curve, long and painful as it may have been, is none of your business, let alone your responsibility.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Martina P Member Since: Jul 11, 2018
40 of 54

John B wrote:

As a hiring client who works almost exclusively with newcomers - here are some recommendations to consider in your work with your newcomer.

 

Consider them to be in as much a learning mode as you are (in developing the relationship and figuring out 'how to work together'.)

- Freelance work delivery is a specialization that can take years to master.  One must usually deliver many projects and make a few mistakes to figure out best practices. 

 

Put the newcomer into a delivery "box".  This is a term used in professional consulting, and not meant to be diminishing.  A delivery box is a tightly sealed set of requirements, work requests, and deliverables.

- I recommend a scoping document of one-half to one page, which is check-box style. 

- Then, when the newcomer has hit their marks, delivery is practically guaranteed to be judged a success


Free up time a couple times a week to communicate with your newcomer.  Project owner to project delivery resource connectivity is a top three project success factor.

- Upwork provides a video conference facility.  Be proactive, schedule the meetings from your end, and work from the delivery definition worksheet.

 

Realize that newcomers may experience a state of darn-near-fear.  They are trying to gain the scores necessary to become a rising talent and, later, a top contractor. This process literally impacts their ability to win work and create revenue for themselves.

- Each of their project scores are vital to them.  The concern applied to what score they will receive may not be stated.  It will be felt.

- Speak to them about the JSS score and that you understand it is important to them.

 

These will help you get the best out of your newcomer - and, for that matter - all freelancers you engage.

 

On-topic comments are encouraged.

 

John.

 

 


Or just work with an experienced freelancer and pay a little more. 

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