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ddjordjevic
Community Member

How to teach Old Dog new Rising Talent tricks?

Hi everybody.

 

Afters several very successful years on UpWork, I took a break. Now, I reactivated myself and during last two months I'm trying to get my Rising Start badge. I had 4 contracts, sucessfully finished two of them, two ongoing contracts are going well, I apply for jobs from time to time.

 

Giving the fact that I have spent more than 1200 hours on UpWork, have earned more than 20k and accomplished more than 150 jobs, I'm still not sure whether I am doing good to earn Rising Talent badge or not. A friend of mine recently started with UpWork and got her badge after one sucessfully accomplished job. 

 

Am I missing something here? 🙂
Upwork readines test - done, full profile - done, 100% availability - done.

 

Thanks, 
Dragan

8 REPLIES 8
jr-translation
Community Member

Just ignoren the Rising Talent badge. I never had it because it was paused last year and you can perfectly do without. Just stop stressing yourself about it and find better use for your energy by checking out your competitors.

I am my worst competitor 🙂 Thansk for advice, Jennifer. Somehow I have impression that people nowadays do not have time to read CVs, only looking for green and red checkmarks. "Red! Ewwww... Burn it with fire!"

Hi Dragan. I'm not sure about this, but your previous work on Upwork might be preventing you from getting Rising Talent. RT is intended for new Upworkers.

Dragan,  you might want to reword this line on your profile: "I have some basic experience in SEO/HTML/CSS/PHP."

 

I know Joomla is your area of expertize but if you want to mention other stuff > reword it in an honest and positive fashion.

 

And ignore the Rising Talent stuff > it is only a strange carrot for the newbies to FLing.


@Wendy C wrote:

Dragan,  you might want to reword this line on your profile: "I have some basic experience in SEO/HTML/CSS/PHP."

 

I know Joomla is your area of expertize but if you want to mention other stuff > reword it in an honest and positive fashion.

 

And ignore the Rising Talent stuff > it is only a strange carrot for the newbies to FLing.


 Yeah, and as carrots go, this particular version is tough and stringy, to boot.  

Wendy, thanks for advice, I will certainly do that.

I always tell my clients (my prospects) that I am not Jack of all trades.

After some time on UpWork, or as freelancer, I'm aware that all this is not about money only. At the end of the day, besides money, what counts is - peace. I don't want, and I will never do, take job that I don't know how to accomplish, and it is not matter how much one is willing to pay for that. I know to do what I know to do. No more, no less, and it costs as much as it costs. And I want my "Old Dog" badge 🙂 

Yes, like Richard said...

 

The "Rising Talent" is NOT USED FOR experienced Upwork freelancers such as the original poster.

 

His friend who JUST BARELY JOINED Upwork and quickly got the badge... That is who the badge is intended for: NEW freelancers who demonstrate a high level of professionalism.

 

The purpose of the badge is to help draw positive attention to NEW freelancers, to compensate for the relative disadvantage they have when competing for jobs against experienced veterans such as the original poster.

 

So no veteran freelancer should bemoan their inability to earn the "Rising Talent" badge.

8f6b973b
Community Member

The comparison between dog and cat brains, as well as the inclusion of raccoons in the discussion, is an interesting topic. While it's difficult to definitively declare a "winner" when it comes to intelligence between dogs and cats, it's important to note that intelligence can vary widely within each species, and different animals have unique skills and abilities.

Here are some points to consider:

  1. Brain Size and Neurons: While dogs generally have larger brains than cats, the number of neurons in their brains is roughly similar. Neurons are the cells responsible for processing and transmitting information in the brain. Raccoons, as mentioned, also have a similar number of neurons to dogs, which is noteworthy given their smaller size compared to dogs.

  2. Specialized Skills: Dogs are known for their strong sense of smell and have been trained for various tasks, such as search and rescue, tracking, and drug detection. Cats, on the other hand, have excellent agility and are skilled hunters. Their intelligence is often demonstrated in their ability to stalk and catch prey.

  3. Social Behavior: Dogs are generally more social animals and have evolved to work closely with humans. This social intelligence is a key aspect of their behavior. Cats are more solitary by nature, and their intelligence may be expressed differently, such as in their problem-solving abilities.

  4. Learning and Training: Dogs are often easier to train due to their social nature and desire to please their owners. Cats can also be trained to some extent, but they may be less motivated by human approval and more independent in their behavior.

  5. Context Matters: What we consider intelligence in a dog or cat may depend on the context. For example, a dog's ability to understand and respond to human commands might be considered a form of intelligence, while a cat's ability to navigate its environment stealthily could also be seen as a display of intelligence.

Ultimately, it's important to recognize that intelligence in animals is multifaceted and can manifest in various ways. Comparing the intelligence of dogs, cats, and raccoons can be challenging because they have evolved different skills and behaviors to adapt to their respective environments and lifestyles. Rather than trying to determine a clear "winner," it's more meaningful to appreciate the unique qualities and abilities of each species.

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