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I will pay you $2/hour.

Active Member
Carlos B Member Since: Apr 25, 2019
1 of 29

So I have been seeing and flaging these posters basically solicilting slave labor.  Member since Jul 26, 2011. I tihnk it is everybodies responsibilty to flag and report. Good luck finding work everyone.

Community Guru
Mary W Member Since: Nov 10, 2014
2 of 29

You are right.  These jobs violate the Terms of Service, which sets a $3 hourly or $5 fixed rate minimum. We all need to flag these terrible clients.

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
3 of 29

Carlos:

What exactly are you seeing?

The Upwork client-side user interface doesn't actually allow a client to hire freelancers (for new client/freelancer relationships) at any rate below $3.00/hour.

 

Read:

Minimum Hourly Rates

 

Screen Shot 2019-05-14 at 3.33.38 PM.png

Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
4 of 29

Preston H wrote:

What exactly are you seeing?

The Upwork client-side user interface doesn't actually allow a client to hire freelancers (for new client/freelancer relationships) at any rate below $3.00/hour.

 


It's easy to hire below this rate; all a client has to do is post a fixed price project and state that the pay is $2/hour. Or, even less (I saw one that worked out to $1.50/hour).

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
5 of 29

re: "It's easy to hire below this rate; all a client has to do is post a fixed price project and state that the pay is $2/hour. Or, even less (I saw one that worked out to $1.50/hour)."

 

Christine:

If you say you have seen something like this, I believe you.

 

But obviously it doesn't make any sense for any freelancer to get involved in a contract which mixes elements of fixed-price contracts and hourly contracts. I think that never ends well for the freelancer.

 

A fixed-price contract is set up to pay for a specific deliverable.

So if the project only takes me 5 minutes to complete, then maybe I end up making $100 / hour. If the task takes me 10 hours, then maybe I end up making a very low hourly rate. But fixed-price contracts are for deliverables, not for time worked.

Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
6 of 29

Preston H wrote:

re: "It's easy to hire below this rate; all a client has to do is post a fixed price project and state that the pay is $2/hour. Or, even less (I saw one that worked out to $1.50/hour)."

 

Christine:

If you say you have seen something like this, I believe you.

 

But obviously it doesn't make any sense for any freelancer to get involved in a contract which mixes elements of fixed-price contracts and hourly contracts. I think that never ends well for the freelancer.

 

A fixed-price contract is set up to pay for a specific deliverable.

So if the project only takes me 5 minutes to complete, then maybe I end up making $100 / hour. If the task takes me 10 hours, then maybe I end up making a very low hourly rate. But fixed-price contracts are for deliverables, not for time worked.


Hey, you don't need to convince me - I'm not the one who's bidding on this dodgy stuff. But yes, I see these types of jobs at least two or three times a week. (I bid on lots of Word and PowerPoint projects, so I often get admin-type jobs in my news feed - people in this category are often willing to work for extremely low wages.) The most outrageous RFPs (which I posted about in a thread a few months ago) are from clients who try to hire full-time secretaries or assistants for an hourly pay rate that's below the legal minimum wage in their countries. There was a project posted by a client in Ontario, Canada which stated, "We'd like you to come to our office and work 40 hours per week on an ongoing basis; the pay is $300/month." So they were offering to pay about $1.50/hour in a place where the legal minimum wage is $14/hour for full-time employees. I always report such projects to Upwork, but really, these people should be reported to the authorities. 

Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
7 of 29

Before decrying $2 an hour as "slave labor" go and look up average minimum hourly wages across the globe's countries. You will be shocked how many average under $1 let alone under $2 (note all converted to USD for point of comparison). $2 is somewhat arbitrary and checking off that amount as slave labor but the actual $3 UW minimum as perfectly acceptable, makes the argument specious. Your point of view on the offered amount will be based entirely on where you live. If you are going to have a global marketplace and let everyone compete within a single pot then have to be prepared to see rates that are offensive in your region but possibly a godsend in others. 

 

The answer here is to keep scrolling or use the filters. There is no gun to your head forcing you to work for any specific rate. Otherwise, if you are going to look at the world's job postings, expect to see amounts that don't fit your living situation. 

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
8 of 29

Scott B wrote:

Before decrying $2 an hour as "slave labor" go and look up average minimum hourly wages across the globe's countries. You will be shocked how many average under $1 let alone under $2 (note all converted to USD for point of comparison). $2 is somewhat arbitrary and checking off that amount as slave labor but the actual $3 UW minimum as perfectly acceptable, makes the argument specious. Your point of view on the offered amount will be based entirely on where you live. If you are going to have a global marketplace and let everyone compete within a single pot then have to be prepared to see rates that are offensive in your region but possibly a godsend in others. 

 

The answer here is to keep scrolling or use the filters. There is no gun to your head forcing you to work for any specific rate. Otherwise, if you are going to look at the world's job postings, expect to see amounts that don't fit your living situation. 



All right. So the clients from rich countries are aware that they are looking for people they can easily exploit. Fine, to some people, this is not a problem. Well, not everybody thinks along this path. If I were in a "wealthy" country, and were to hire someone from a "not so wealthy" country, I would be glad to be making some freelancer feel good about making more money than he or she usually does. It would not hurt my finances. I really think adjusting what I pay him or her just to deprive him from a little happiness is evil. 

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
9 of 29

Luce N wrote:

Scott B wrote:

Before decrying $2 an hour as "slave labor" go and look up average minimum hourly wages across the globe's countries. You will be shocked how many average under $1 let alone under $2 (note all converted to USD for point of comparison). $2 is somewhat arbitrary and checking off that amount as slave labor but the actual $3 UW minimum as perfectly acceptable, makes the argument specious. Your point of view on the offered amount will be based entirely on where you live. If you are going to have a global marketplace and let everyone compete within a single pot then have to be prepared to see rates that are offensive in your region but possibly a godsend in others. 

 

The answer here is to keep scrolling or use the filters. There is no gun to your head forcing you to work for any specific rate. Otherwise, if you are going to look at the world's job postings, expect to see amounts that don't fit your living situation. 



All right. So the clients from rich countries are aware that they are looking for people they can easily exploit. Fine, to some people, this is not a problem. Well, not everybody thinks along this path. If I were in a "wealthy" country, and were to hire someone from a "not so wealthy" country, I would be glad to be making some freelancer feel good about making more money than he or she usually does. It would not hurt my finances. I really think adjusting what I pay him or her just to deprive him from a little happiness is evil. 


Paying someone what amounts to the going rate in their economy is not, by definition, exploitative. If a US start-up company has no capital to speak of, cannot afford to pay US rates but can find a competent FL in a developing nation who will happily do the work for a rate they can afford, how is that a bad thing? Enforcing a minimum rate aligned with first-world economies will simply drive clients to hire closer to home or not at all. Instead of helping that poor FL earn more, it would deprive her of the opportunity altogether. Obviously, many companies could afford to spend more and are simply economizing. Again, not categorically exploitative if they are providing good opportunities. 

Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
10 of 29

Luce N wrote:

All right. So the clients from rich countries are aware that they are looking for people they can easily exploit. Fine, to some people, this is not a problem. Well, not everybody thinks along this path. If I were in a "wealthy" country, and were to hire someone from a "not so wealthy" country, I would be glad to be making some freelancer feel good about making more money than he or she usually does. It would not hurt my finances. I really think adjusting what I pay him or her just to deprive him from a little happiness is evil. 

Not really clear what you are saying frankly but let's take this to US only. If someone takes a job in a small town in Mississippi and someone takes the same job in San Francisco, is it the expectation that the wage should be the same? 

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