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Re: Problems facing the freelancers and the main reason of those problems is the client and Upwork

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
11 of 34

@Ramon B wrote:

Nothing? Are you suggesting there is no discrimination towards women trying to break into traditionally masculine fields of work? Moreover, in areas, (Law, Medicine) that are now predominately female, should we refer to everyone as she?

 


 

Can't speak for other professions, but yep, that's exactly what I'm saying about IT. No one is holding back females from IT. We have plenty of opportunities.

 

From my experience, females are usually insecure and IT is a pretty ego stuffed field. This is probably where females feel insecure about it. Don't get me wrong. Tech interviews are hard. Really hard sometimes. But, they are just as hard for men as they are women. I've had some jerk interviewers, but I never sensed it was about gender but about the interviewer just being a jerk.

 

I walk into interviews with the attitude "I got skills bro and I got pink hair and I'm wearing yellow for an interview... what?" LOL  

 

Of course, confidence in any field comes with experience and new IT females might feel the pressure. It has nothing to do with gender, though. It's about feeling confident and just not caring about the small stuff. Whenever there has been this huge jerk in the office, he's a jerk with everyone and no one likes him. I say just do your thang and ignore the haters.

Community Guru
Aleksandra K Member Since: Mar 31, 2015
12 of 34

Jennifer,

 

In my opinion regardless of your audience you should always use a neutral pronoun. If the majority is men it doesn’t mean that this is the ONLY audience. If I was reading an article where the only pronoun is “he” I would probably think it was written by a man or by somebody who doesn’t know that proper articles should be written with neutral pronouns (Nothing personal here, just my opinion for articles in general). However, everyone has the right to decide how they want to write their articles.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
13 of 34

@Aleksandra K wrote:

Jennifer,

 

In my opinion regardless of your audience you should always use a neutral pronoun. If the majority is men it doesn’t mean that this is the ONLY audience. If I was reading an article where the only pronoun is “he” I would probably think it was written by a man or by somebody who doesn’t know that proper articles should be written with neutral pronouns (Nothing personal here, just my opinion for articles in general). However, everyone has the right to decide how they want to write their articles.


 

Yes, but "they" is plural and an ed will ding you for applying plurals to singular. As one ed said to me, pick a pronoun and go with it.  I choose to go with the majority.

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
14 of 34

That would be women then, at 50.2% total worldwide population.

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
15 of 34

Anyway, lots of people writing for male dominated professions like economics specifically foreground female examples because of this. I read a LOT of stuff each week, and nearly every European writer does this.

Community Guru
Aleksandra K Member Since: Mar 31, 2015
16 of 34

Ramon,

 

What is your approach? Do you use plural, one pronoun, or both he and she? I am just wondering how native speakers usually write.

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
17 of 34

They, them, these etc.

 

Funnily enough, this never hindered me in the real world, or even the years spent living in a country whose language I could barely speak.

Community Guru
Robert James R Member Since: Apr 17, 2015
18 of 34

They is not just considered plural. It's also considered as 3rd person. If the context was about a general statement that pertains to no specific gender or person like "he/she didn't do it right", they would be much more appropriate specially if you aim to be as gender neutral as you can.

 

IMO this isn't exactly something to be offended about. Rather, it just goes to show how change is slow yet constant. I discarded my use of gender-specific pronouns when pertaining to a general audience around when I was still in gradeschool (roughly around 9 or 10 years of age) and I think it has stemmed from me simply adjusting to what was proper when it comes to writing news, novels, or any sort of essay school required me to write before.

 

It's something to be offended about if the context of which it was used in was meant to offend or rather imply an offensive remark towards the opposite sex. 

 

But I agree that often times we let our grounds on being offended as basis for being right.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
19 of 34

@Robert James R wrote:

They is not just considered plural. It's also considered as 3rd person. If the context was about a general statement that pertains to no specific gender or person like "he/she didn't do it right", they would be much more appropriate specially if you aim to be as gender neutral as you can.

 

 


 

There are occasions where you need to pick a pronoun. Just for instance, if I wrote "The technician found the issue with the PC, and they fixed it." This is incorrect grammar. This is where the "pick a pronoun and go with it" is needed.

 

Since the majority of my audience is men, I go with "he." Sometimes, I do it on purpose to troll a female ed. LOL

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Ace Contributor
Paul M Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
20 of 34

Disclaimer: I'm a White, middle-aged man. Use it as a stick, if you will.

 

In all my writing, gender is never a consideration. To expand on the example in this thread, I would use "the freelancer" in preference to "he" or "she" or the even less attractive "he/she". I'm not really sure at what point in my life I made that change, whether consciously or not.

 

However, I' m not sure using one gender or the other is grounds for offence, in all honesty, unless used in a specific context to maliciously exclude one or the other.

 

I doubt very much that the OP was intending to show any disrespect to women either in his home country or elsewhere. In some countries using "he" would be the natural thing to do. The rest of the world may not like it, but it is simply an education or cultural issue, and not as a result of outright gender-bias on the part of the speaker/writer, necessarily. There will be instances where misogyny is openly evident, but I don't think this is one of them.

 

Old habits die hard. Or slowly, at least. It's not that long ago that the likes of the UK and US were no different. Is it our place to now sneer at those who are taking longer to adapt? I don't think so.

 

I do wonder how, and when, the world came to be offended so easily. Not just on this subject, but on all.

 

It's a miracle a lot of people manage to function in the real world.

 

No offence Smiley Wink

 

 

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