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dyumnin
Community Member

NDA for fixed $5 Job?

I saw an RFQ in my feed for a fixed $5 Job requiring signing of an NDA!
While the $5 most won't even cover the time spent by me in reading and understanding the NDA, let alone getting it evaluated by a lawyer etc., I am curious to know

  1. Under what circumstances do you agree to sign an NDA?
  2. What is the minimum payment that you would expect in such cases?
7 REPLIES 7
sivavranagaro
Community Member

Maybe it's a placeholder sum. 

1) hourly job 

2) $50 at least

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h3hdv7rlssvtxxzp
Community Member

I dont know about NDA, but just recently I spotted one potential client who required two ID copies and a video recording before the interview. That sounds like serious business, but this one did not have payment method verified, not a single dollar spent and never hired anyone. Just registered a couple of days ago.

 

Hmm.

 


@Kristo H wrote:

That sounds like serious business, 


 That sounds like possible identity theft.

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r2streu
Community Member

I sign NDAs all the time, but mostly for either long-term clients or big-ticket singles. 

 

I ran into something like that. Job was offering $20 FIRM, and had like 7 freaking questions just to submit a proposal. 

 

Sorry, dude. I'm not filling out a job application for a 20-dollar gig.

 

To answer your question, I wouldn't APPLY for a $5 job, let alone sign an NDA for them. That said, I probably WOULD submit a proposal for a more appropriate amount. If they agreed to my proposal, then sure. 🙂

re: "reading and understanding the NDA, let alone getting it evaluated by a lawyer etc"

 

The original poster has a great question and presents an interesting scenario...

 

I'll add my two cents about NDAs generally:

You certainly don't need to get them evaluated by a lawyer.

I suggest reading them, signing them, and not making a big deal about it.

 

Keep in mind that most NDAs were NOT written by the people who send them to you. In my experience, most clients who send me NDAs to sign have never read the NDAs and they're only sending them to me because their company's legal dept. asked them to do so.

 

The original poster probably doesn't even live in the same country as the client. Any NDA the freelancer signs is basically on the "honor system" and is unenforceable in any practical sense.

 

When I sign NDAs, their intentions are "enforced" because I am an ethical, professional freelancer. Not because there is really any way for anybody to prevent me from violating the NDA.

A legitimate NDA (in other words, one that isn't some kind of attempt at identity theft) should really only have a place for your name and signature.

 

Maybe a date.

 

In my experience, real NDAs are NOT "job applications" and they are not accompanied by requests for additional personal information, copies of drivers licenses, etc.

I've been signing NDA's and confidentiality agreements for nearly fifty years. I scan them for non-compete clauses; if there are none, I sign. Once, I signed one from my client's attorney that restricted me from doing any work of any type for anyone other than that client for ten years. I also rewrote it for the learning-disabled lawyer, taking all that crap out. Her NDA was prima facie unreasonable restraint of trade, and would not survive a judge with a pulse.

 

I usually ask clients to include my employees, agents and contractors on the NDA to make it clear that they may have access to the information, and are bound by the same agreement.

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