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Poetry

allpurposewriter
Community Guru
Anthony H Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
42 of 42

Cohen was great. Neil Diamond had his moments. I don't know who David Hayward or Jim Steinman were -- or, wait: Is that the Moody Blues? -- but I do want to say John, wow. I've never seen that lyric written down and it certainly reads extraordinarily well. However, you forgot to give credit, so for the record, that's John Lennon's song "Tomorrow Never Knows," -- his ode to transcendental meditation. Beautiful. 

 

For my money, Dylan, Randy Newman, the incomparable John Prine (when he's not being too silly), Jim Morrison, Joni Mitchell -- all would have been great poets even without guitars or drums backing them up. Paul Simon, of course, is a worthy candidate, although somewhat commercial.

 

 

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
42 of 42

c9ccb5422c3ab9d5c2248742020d0ce4.jpgAnd a river lies

Between the dusk and dawning skies,
And hours are distance, measured wide
Along that transnocturnal tide
Too doomed to fear, lost to all need,
These voyagers blackward fast recede
Where darkness shines like dazzling light
Throughout the Twelve Hours of the Night.

They move in dark, old places of the world:
Like mariners, once healthy and clear-eyed,
Who, when their ship was holed, could not admit
Ruin and the necessity of flight,
But chose instead to ride their cherished wreck
Down into darkness; there not quite to drown,
But ever on continue plying sails
Against the midnight currents of the depths,
Moving from pit to pit to lightless crag
In hopeless search for some ascent to shore;
And who, in their decayed, slow voyaging
Do presently lose all desire for light
And air and living company-from here
Their search is only for the deepest groves,
Those farthest from the nigh-forgotten sun

 

— The Twelve Hours of the Night, William Ashbless, London, 1810.

 

 

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
reinierb
Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
42 of 42

Petra R wrote:

Reinier B wrote:

Petra R wrote:

I'm more a song lyrics kind of girl Smiley Wink

 

Poetry with music


Like Justin Hayward makes. Or Leonard Cohen. Or maybe Roger Waters and David Gilmour. Or Jim Steinman. Or even Neil Diamond on his better days. 


COHEN!

 

Recently discovered "Avelange!"

 


Then you will like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Z39KZAryzk&list=RDDqlAxfnG5oI&index=3 

An old classic somewhat reworked. 

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
42 of 42

Reinier B wrote:

Like Justin Hayward makes. Or Leonard Cohen. Or maybe Roger Waters and David Gilmour. Or Jim Steinman. Or even Neil Diamond on his better days. 

COHEN!

 

Recently discovered "Avelanche!"

 


Then you will like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Z39KZAryzk&list=RDDqlAxfnG5oI&index=3 

An old classic somewhat reworked. 


Not so much.

My taste in music is rather eclectic Smiley Very Happy

luce-neidert
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
42 of 42

Ha ha ha, just read an article in a French newspaper mentioning American politicians who are over 70 and to whom this Corona thing could be fatal.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
42 of 42

Luce N wrote:

Ha ha ha, just read an article in a French newspaper mentioning American politicians who are over 70 and to whom this Corona thing could be fatal.


Luce, cherie, wrong thread LOL

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
42 of 42

Petra R wrote:

Luce, cherie, wrong thread LOL

I can't let you go away with this even if I have to go off-topic a bit.

 

You may want to write Luce, ma chérie. It's not about the accent, it's about the possessive ma that changes the meaning in a subtle way.

 

The idiomatic expression ma chérie may be used by a woman to address another woman playfully, or even in a slightly provocative way. Ma chère is more common and a bit less loaded.

 

But chérie alone is rarely used outside of a romantic context.

 

Sorry. I had to.

 

 

 

 

 

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
42 of 42

Rene K wrote:

Petra R wrote:

Luce, cherie, wrong thread LOL

I can't let you go away with this even if I have to go off-topic a bit.

 

You may want to write Luce, ma chérie. It's not about the accent, it's about the possessive ma that changes the meaning in a subtle way.

 

The idiomatic expression ma chérie may be used by a woman to address another woman playfully, or even in a slightly provocative way. Ma chère is more common and a bit less loaded.


My French sucks Smiley Very Happy

I meant to use it instead of "dear"

yitwail
Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
42 of 42

A couple I read as a child Cat Wink

How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!

How cheerfully he seems to grin
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in,
With gently smiling jaws!

 

fatherwilliam2.jpg

 

"You are old, Father William," the young man said,
⁠"And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head—
⁠Do you think, at your age, it is right?"


"In my youth," Father William replied to his son,
⁠"I feared it might injure the brain;
But now that Im perfectly sure I have none,
⁠Why, I do it again and again."

 

"You are old," said the youth, "as I mentioned before,
⁠And have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door—
⁠Pray, what is the reason of that?"


"In my youth," said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
⁠"I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment—one shilling the box—
⁠Allow me to sell you a couple?"

 

"You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak
⁠For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak—
⁠Pray, how did you manage to do it?"


"In my youth," said his father, "I took to the law,
⁠And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
⁠Has lasted the rest of my life."

 

"You are old," said the youth; "one would hardly suppose
⁠That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose—
⁠What made you so awfully clever?"


"I have answered three questions, and that is enough,"
⁠Said his father; "don't give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
⁠Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs!"

 

fatherwilliam3.jpg

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
allpurposewriter
Community Guru
Anthony H Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
42 of 42

I love the selections here. Lots of great ones ... thanks for getting this thread going, John.

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