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Re: Just How Low Can They Go?

Community Guru
Irene B Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
21 of 29

I think this one takes the cake...

 

I got an invitation to apply for a job a little while ago. I immediately knew this was NOT for me, but they were asking a few pertinent questions...and I thought, you know what, Irene? ANSWER them. And I did.

 

In summary, I told them my rate per 100 words (the offered rate was VERYYYYY low)...and I told them why that was my rate. I also told them their time expectations were ridiculous, and wanting to know my typing speed equally so. This is simply because, although I type really fast, I don't WRITE equally fast. The two have nothing in common. Furthermore, they expected a ridiculously fast turnaround for a project that demanded an insane amount of research. Getting the picture yet? 

 

Anyway... Suffice it to say, I was not deemed a fit. But something kept nagging me. And I resorted to google. I was SURE I had heard about them somewhere or the other. And I was right.

 

This company does not have the greatest track record and are known for their really cheap content creation. Upon further browsing, I found the rate they charged their CLIENTS was way below MY asking rate. They would be losing money big time if they had hired me. I have NO idea how this company could possibly make a profit. 

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
22 of 29

Mark F wrote:

Yeah, my bad.  I should have gone with my initial instincts and just back out of this...

 

Sorry that I misconstrued whatever I misconstrued.


Why back out?  That's not my intent either. It's a discussion. 

I'm just saying I don't buy the bit about it being the fault of the people who take the contracts that some companies that appear to have enough money have decided to post ridiculously underfunded contracts. That's been a standard line for a long time. There are a lot of reasons people may opt to take **bleep**ty paying contracts on this board. For one, they may be new to the board and they may want to build a presence. That's not as easy to do as it was a few years ago. They may want to start doing work that is more inline with their education than the previous jobs they've had and they may feel that taking underfunded contracts is the only way to do that.  

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, 
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. your philosophy

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
23 of 29

T


Kathy T wrote:

There's always ways of getting around things such as the minimum rate either for fixed rate or hourly jobs. When it comes to "wealthy" clients there are 2 groups. One being that the client knows that to hire a professional, competent, experienced and skilled freelancer it will cost. The other group is the "cheap" client. who will try to pay the lowest amount they possibly can and get the most work. 

 

I've said before, and it looks like this job is fits my assumption, that one day here, you'll see freelancers Paying a client to complete the client's work. This job falls into the lowest paid category. Other fall into the no payment category by providing free samples or mockup of the actual work in hopes that when the client gets the work, the clients will pay that freelancer. 

 

I posted a job a long time ago and will always remember one proposal I got. "I do good work, pay me what you think."  

The irony and facts are that even though this specific job would only pay 25 cents an hours there will be more then one freelancer submitting proposals for it.


I agree, seing so called freelancers trying to sell themselves for next to nothing is terrifying. I hope they understand that they are not just hurting themselves.

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
24 of 29

Luce N wrote:

T


Kathy T wrote:

There's always ways of getting around things such as the minimum rate either for fixed rate or hourly jobs. When it comes to "wealthy" clients there are 2 groups. One being that the client knows that to hire a professional, competent, experienced and skilled freelancer it will cost. The other group is the "cheap" client. who will try to pay the lowest amount they possibly can and get the most work. 

 

I've said before, and it looks like this job is fits my assumption, that one day here, you'll see freelancers Paying a client to complete the client's work. This job falls into the lowest paid category. Other fall into the no payment category by providing free samples or mockup of the actual work in hopes that when the client gets the work, the clients will pay that freelancer. 

 

I posted a job a long time ago and will always remember one proposal I got. "I do good work, pay me what you think."  

The irony and facts are that even though this specific job would only pay 25 cents an hours there will be more then one freelancer submitting proposals for it.


I agree, seing so called freelancers trying to sell themselves for next to nothing is terrifying. I hope they understand that they are not just hurting themselves.


I think so too, but it's similar to what people do when they take low-paid or unpaid internships. People sometimes take unpaid interships with big name companies or publications in the hopes of getting a job afterwards. Even the UN has unpaid internships in cities like New York, where the cost of living makes that seem unfathomable. 
https://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2014/04/22/the-unhappy-rise-of-the-millennial-intern/#671c7c73...


Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
25 of 29

The problem with any site like this is not so much the bottom feeders, the farmers, or the freelancers spoiling it for others (who is altruistic in this game?), but the perception both clients and freelancers get from the site's offer. "Affordable" for the client and "earn money, when you want, where you want" for the freelancer, are carrots that are hard to resist. Having freelanced for years, I think these incentives are outdated.

 

In a global sense, the affordable/earn scale is so vast and so varied that, unless one knows how to operate within it, must invariably lead to disappointment for both parties.

 

We all know that online job sites are not welfare states. They are profit-oriented businesses who will only protect their customers (clients and freelancers) up to a point and if it is in their own interests to do so.

 

However, it is up to them and their future to get that protection right, and I think it would be in their interests to change the tired carrot/donkey scenario and exact a level of professionalism in both client and freelancer that would help ensure profitability for all.

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
26 of 29

Renata S wrote:

Luce N wrote:

I agree, seing so called freelancers trying to sell themselves for next to nothing is terrifying. I hope they understand that they are not just hurting themselves.


I think so too, but it's similar to what people do when they take low-paid or unpaid internships. People sometimes take unpaid interships with big name companies or publications in the hopes of getting a job afterwards. Even the UN has unpaid internships in cities like New York, where the cost of living makes that seem unfathomable. 
https://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2014/04/22/the-unhappy-rise-of-the-millennial-intern/#671c7c73...


Hi Renata! Thanks for the article. In this kind of world, you need to have rich parents to be able to afford an internship. This is totally stupid and unfair, particularly if you learn nothing during the internship!

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
27 of 29

Mark F wrote:

Although the client is a problem the real problem is someone will try to get that job.  


Although this might be seen as a completely different kettle of fish, how does that statement work in this case? Who is "the real problem" here?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/07/us/college-cheating-papers.html

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
28 of 29

Renata S wrote:


Although this might be seen as a completely different kettle of fish, how does that statement work in this case? Who is "the real problem" here?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/07/us/college-cheating-papers.html

 


This article is terrible, Renata! First, it shows how low students can go, how little they profit from their studies, how little respect they have for the money they parents spend for their studies. We can foresee the lack of real education this will result in, in wealthier countries.

 

Then you can see the dilemma this poses to students who find themselves forced to sell their talent to survive.

 

Last but not least, how despicable are the platforms who benefit from this trade!

Community Guru
Mary W Member Since: Nov 10, 2014
29 of 29

There are "farmers" posing as freelancers on every platform, including this one, who specialize in homework/ academic fraud.  Always have been.  Like roaches, they are virtually indestructible.

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