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Re: The future seems a whole lot brighter

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
11 of 17

Phyllis G wrote:


Not to rain on your parade, but the vaccination does not prevent infection or transmission, it just makes the illness much less serious.


That is not actually known (yet)

The above is the worst case scenario, but in general the vaccination does more than that. 

gilbert-phyllis
Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
12 of 17

Petra R wrote:

Phyllis G wrote:


Not to rain on your parade, but the vaccination does not prevent infection or transmission, it just makes the illness much less serious.


That is not actually known (yet)

The above is the worst case scenario, but in general the vaccination does more than that. 


My understanding is the best case scenario (for both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines) is 95% effectiveness preventing symptomatic infections after both doses of the vaccine have been administered. The CDC currently estimates that up to 40% of cases are asymptomatic. So, this first wave of vaccines does not represent the kind of silver bullet we are accustomed to with, for instance, the polio vaccine. (Especially true because logistics of distribution and administration are lagging.) It's a huge advance to have effective vaccines at all, at this point. But it seems to me we need to continue taking precautions -- masking and distancing -- for some time to come. 

mwiggenhorn
Community Guru
Mary W Member Since: Nov 10, 2014
13 of 17

The advice from the CDC is to continue masking after vaccination or infection.  Things are uncertain at best as to length of immunization and ease of contagion.  Even if it turns out that I got the "real" stuff, I will continue to mask for as long as it takes.

resultsassoc
Community Guru
Bill H Member Since: Aug 18, 2017
14 of 17

Thank you, Ravendra, for posting this. The fact that first infection to first administered vaccine was under one year is a miracle. The messenger RNA vaccines are my choice for many reasons.

 

Logistics was planned well and executed extremely well. It was always intended to leave final details to the states because every state has unique requirements, geography, demographics, etc, and no one-size-fits-all would work. When states had plans in place things went great. WV, with the country's poorest transporation infrastructure, leads the nation in percentage results. It did so by turning over logistics to the National Guard and telling them to coordinate every day with the US Army, the lead logistics agency. It worked. South Dakota divided the state into thirds, contacted the three largest medical providers in the state and assigned one to each, and told them to go shoot people. SD is secod in the country. Every state was asked where to deliver how many doses, and given guidance on how to run their in-state logistics. New York, New Jersey and California were so unprepared they've had to destroy doses.

 

We are shipping vaccines to the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Palau, and the Northern Mariana Islands. All are administering vaccines.

 

We've always known that the toughest part of the job is logistics. The second-toughest is manufacturing mRNA vaccines. They're difficult to manufacture and few places have the infrastructure to do it. You can't turn a pots and pans factory into an mRNA vaccine factory. We committed to buying hundreds of millions of doses early based on which were most likely to be effective, fewest side effects, and avsilable first. Recommendations were sought from scientists, pharmaceutical manufacturing experts and logistics experts on which to back, and the experts got it right. Some of that is luck, some is following science, engineering and process.

 

All 7.X billion of us want vaccines. We paid to create them and to manufcture them, so we went first. Other countries have paid to create and manufacture vaccines (UK, Russia, China and a couple of others) and went first as well. We are limited to existing manufacturing capability, so we have to compete with the rest of the world. As noted above, we're already serving parts of the rest of the world.

 

Local problems have resulted from the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing, such as the appointment scheduling island started scheduling appointments for four hours before the shot-in-the-arm islsnd opened. Some problems have arisen with various constituencies competing to go early on the list, without regard to CDC guidance. Constituencies then pressure politicians to favor them. None of this has anything to do with either Operation Warp Speed or logistics. If your state is failing you, vote for a different governor next time.

 

I can explain most of the science and logistics if anyone's interested. I'm not pushing to get the vaccine for myself, I expet to be dead from other causes shortly.

 

Mask, stay outdoors when possible, wash hands frequently, and use social distancing when possible. The last one is a bit doubtful, because indoors mist from a sneeze or cough can remain airborne for several hours, and you have no idea when walking into a room whether 94 people stepped inside to sneeze in the last two hours.

 

Young children typically get mild cases, display few to no symptoms, and are not known to spread the disease widely. The elderly, on the other hand, catch the virus easiily, are most at-risk for serious complications, and should be quarantined. Giving grandma a great big hug may literally be the last thing you do for, or to, her.

lucioric
Community Guru
Lucio Ricardo M Member Since: May 16, 2018
15 of 17

But, this is also about the times the vaccine gets to us, specially who don't live in the United States. furthermore when you are at the tail of the priority list, but, in my case i have my wedding in risk of being rescheduled again due to the covid-19 crisis.

luce-neidert
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
16 of 17

Until most people on earth have been vaccinated, we won't be able to go back to "normal living".

 

People living in privileged countries won't be able to travel to less privileged countries because they'll still risk getting infected. This is a wonderful example of the need for solidarity between countries.

lucioric
Community Guru
Lucio Ricardo M Member Since: May 16, 2018
17 of 17
Irony. Now loving means not to hug. And prexautions can be deemed as dislove.
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