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The future seems a whole lot brighter

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
11 of 13

Phyllis G wrote:


Not to rain on your parade, but the vaccination does not prevent infection or transmission, it just makes the illness much less serious.


That is not actually known (yet)

The above is the worst case scenario, but in general the vaccination does more than that. 

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
12 of 13

Petra R wrote:

Phyllis G wrote:


Not to rain on your parade, but the vaccination does not prevent infection or transmission, it just makes the illness much less serious.


That is not actually known (yet)

The above is the worst case scenario, but in general the vaccination does more than that. 


My understanding is the best case scenario (for both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines) is 95% effectiveness preventing symptomatic infections after both doses of the vaccine have been administered. The CDC currently estimates that up to 40% of cases are asymptomatic. So, this first wave of vaccines does not represent the kind of silver bullet we are accustomed to with, for instance, the polio vaccine. (Especially true because logistics of distribution and administration are lagging.) It's a huge advance to have effective vaccines at all, at this point. But it seems to me we need to continue taking precautions -- masking and distancing -- for some time to come. 

Community Guru
Mary W Member Since: Nov 10, 2014
13 of 13

The advice from the CDC is to continue masking after vaccination or infection.  Things are uncertain at best as to length of immunization and ease of contagion.  Even if it turns out that I got the "real" stuff, I will continue to mask for as long as it takes.

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