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What's a decimal point between friends.....

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Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
1 of 9

After a few polite exchanges as to why my proofreading rate of $ 0.02 is not unreasonably high....

 

math.jpg

Community Guru
Bill H Member Since: Aug 18, 2017
BEST ANSWER
2 of 9

Let me guess - it was an American somewhere around 25-35, right? Your pricing is dirt cheap.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
3 of 9

Bill H wrote:

 Your pricing is dirt cheap.


2 Cent a word for mere proofreading of correct text is not "dirt cheap" and we actually settled on 3 Cent in the end anyway, but thanks for your concern.

 

I'll make sure to pass it on to the clients who try to hire translators for translation (not to proofread something that has been translated and edited already) for far less that 2 Cent a word.

 

Community Guru
Bill H Member Since: Aug 18, 2017
4 of 9

The expert translation costs ten to fifteen cents a word - or more -  if you need quality. Paying two cents a word to make sure you got it seems dirt cheap to me. Then again, I don't do paid translation. I do (German and Spanish)>English for free for current clients, as well as English>Spanish, but into anything other than English only for business issues.

 

I envy you. Do you get requests for simultaneous translation? That can be lucrative. I did English-Spanish-German-Portuguese-French-Italian eight way conversation once in Barcelona in 1971, and literally had a brain cramp. I couldn't speak anything for the next three days. Next try was in a German Gasthaus in 1977, an American was negotiating with a German-speaking woman (Eastern European I think) for sexual services. Everybody had already had at least three Mass' Bier and it didn't go well.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
5 of 9

Bill H wrote:

The expert translation costs ten to fifteen cents a word - or more -  if you need quality. Paying two cents a word to make sure you got it seems dirt cheap to me.


It is PROOFREADING, not translation!

 

proofreading.jpg

 

Proofreading is what happens after editing. So this was translated, then checked, now it just needs proofreading. I originally said "2 Cent" but we agreed to go a bit deeper (because when I looked at it, the German was great as such, the photography related terminology not always correct, so it will be more than just adding the odd comma and catching a typo here and there) - hence the 3 Cent per word.

 


Bill H wrote:. Do you get requests for simultaneous translation?

I do and have one client I do phonecalls and virtual meetings with their main (big) customers for, but I don't do one offs as you really need to familiarise yourself with the client's "stuff" and business. There is no looking up words or searching manuals when on a call with a room full of techies...

 


Bill H wrote:

I did English-Spanish-German-Portuguese-French-Italian eight way conversation once in Barcelona in 1971, and literally had a brain cramp. I couldn't speak anything for the next three days.


I know the feeling. (Not 6, I only speak 3, with a few more at a "get by" level) I can cope with a maximum of 3 languages at the same time and only for a finite time. Any more than that knocks out my language center. I have had a particular form of occular / aural migraine (without a headache) from it - the language center can completely shut down and you can not speak or write or even properly think any word in any language, along with visual disturbances.

 

Only had them a handful of times in my life and it is terrifying the first time (I thought I had a stroke or a brain tumour)

 

I "live" in 3 languages in my daily life - I think and mainly function in English, live in Italy and work with German. Any further language cutting in (on TV or whatever) and it all gets dodgy.

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
6 of 9

Petra R wrote:

Bill H wrote:

The expert translation costs ten to fifteen cents a word - or more -  if you need quality. Paying two cents a word to make sure you got it seems dirt cheap to me.


It is PROOFREADING, not translation!

 

proofreading.jpg

 

Proofreading is what happens after editing. So this was translated, then checked, now it just needs proofreading. I originally said "2 Cent" but we agreed to go a bit deeper (because when I looked at it, the German was great as such, the photography related terminology not always correct, so it will be more than just adding the odd comma and catching a typo here and there) - hence the 3 Cent per word.

 


Bill H wrote:. Do you get requests for simultaneous translation?

I do and have one client I do phonecalls and virtual meetings with their main (big) customers for, but I don't do one offs as you really need to familiarise yourself with the client's "stuff" and business. There is no looking up words or searching manuals when on a call with a room full of techies...

 


Bill H wrote:

I did English-Spanish-German-Portuguese-French-Italian eight way conversation once in Barcelona in 1971, and literally had a brain cramp. I couldn't speak anything for the next three days.


I know the feeling. (Not 6, I only speak 3, with a few more at a "get by" level) I can cope with a maximum of 3 languages at the same time and only for a finite time. Any more than that knocks out my language center. I have had a particular form of occular / aural migraine (without a headache) from it - the language center can completely shut down and you can not speak or write or even properly think any word in any language, along with visual disturbances.

 

Only had them a handful of times in my life and it is terrifying the first time (I thought I had a stroke or a brain tumour)

 

I "live" in 3 languages in my daily life - I think and mainly function in English, live in Italy and work with German. Any further language cutting in (on TV or whatever) and it all gets dodgy.

 

A few years ago I was interpreting on a fair changing constantly between German, English, and Spanish. During one meeting with my client (Spanish with very poor to no English) and his client (British) I ended up interpreting English to English. While the Spanish asked if I can find Spanish words for everthing the British laught and said he know understood how interpreting works. I had managed to repeat what he had said using completely different words. I got booked by that company for the two following years as well as got recommended to other Spanish companies. Due to that "mistake" I never had to apply for jobs on fairs while at university.

 

My daily life consists of mainly 3 languages but last week I went to the dentist and she's from Bolivia and one of the ladies in kindergarden is from Chile, so I still get to speak Spanish but mainly it is German (at home), English (for work), and Norwegian. It starts to affect our 3-year-old as well. He is picking up English at the moment and mixes it into his German and Norwegian.



Community Guru
Pat M Member Since: Jun 18, 2016
7 of 9

Jennifer R wrote:

Petra R wrote:

Bill H wrote:

The expert translation costs ten to fifteen cents a word - or more -  if you need quality. Paying two cents a word to make sure you got it seems dirt cheap to me.


It is PROOFREADING, not translation!

 

proofreading.jpg

 

Proofreading is what happens after editing. So this was translated, then checked, now it just needs proofreading. I originally said "2 Cent" but we agreed to go a bit deeper (because when I looked at it, the German was great as such, the photography related terminology not always correct, so it will be more than just adding the odd comma and catching a typo here and there) - hence the 3 Cent per word.

 


Bill H wrote:. Do you get requests for simultaneous translation?

I do and have one client I do phonecalls and virtual meetings with their main (big) customers for, but I don't do one offs as you really need to familiarise yourself with the client's "stuff" and business. There is no looking up words or searching manuals when on a call with a room full of techies...

 


Bill H wrote:

I did English-Spanish-German-Portuguese-French-Italian eight way conversation once in Barcelona in 1971, and literally had a brain cramp. I couldn't speak anything for the next three days.


I know the feeling. (Not 6, I only speak 3, with a few more at a "get by" level) I can cope with a maximum of 3 languages at the same time and only for a finite time. Any more than that knocks out my language center. I have had a particular form of occular / aural migraine (without a headache) from it - the language center can completely shut down and you can not speak or write or even properly think any word in any language, along with visual disturbances.

 

Only had them a handful of times in my life and it is terrifying the first time (I thought I had a stroke or a brain tumour)

 

I "live" in 3 languages in my daily life - I think and mainly function in English, live in Italy and work with German. Any further language cutting in (on TV or whatever) and it all gets dodgy.

 

A few years ago I was interpreting on a fair changing constantly between German, English, and Spanish. During one meeting with my client (Spanish with very poor to no English) and his client (British) I ended up interpreting English to English. While the Spanish asked if I can find Spanish words for everthing the British laught and said he know understood how interpreting works. I had managed to repeat what he had said using completely different words. I got booked by that company for the two following years as well as got recommended to other Spanish companies. Due to that "mistake" I never had to apply for jobs on fairs while at university.

 

My daily life consists of mainly 3 languages but last week I went to the dentist and she's from Bolivia and one of the ladies in kindergarden is from Chile, so I still get to speak Spanish but mainly it is German (at home), English (for work), and Norwegian. It starts to affect our 3-year-old as well. He is picking up English at the moment and mixes it into his German and Norwegian.

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Jennifer, I now have a headache.




 

Community Guru
Anthony H Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
8 of 9

Gotta love these Upwork threads. You mention trouble with a flat tire and everyone response with advice on how to fix a broken toe.

What's worse: Everyone starts ragging on the person who began the thread for breaking their toe. Pretty soon nobody knows which way is up anymore.

Ironic that you got into that snafu on a proofreading job, Petra.


Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
9 of 9

Anthony H wrote:

Gotta love these Upwork threads. You mention trouble with a flat tire and everyone response with advice on how to fix a broken toe.

What's worse: Everyone starts ragging on the person who began the thread for breaking their toe. Pretty soon nobody knows which way is up anymore.

Ironic that you got into that snafu on a proofreading job, Petra.



lol it's funny cuz true. Pretty sure Petra doesn't need help.

 

Petra, I giggled. It's all good.

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