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Another newbie query ... searches and legal jobs this time!

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Community Leader
Naomi J Member Since: May 15, 2015
1 of 7

Hi all, thank you for being a lovely helpful forum.

 

I have mostly been doing writing jobs since signing up, which is fine as I enjoy it and it's straightforward.  However, I also have a law degree and experience writing policy for small organisations, debt chasing letters, and other such fun things.  I like this sort of thing even more.

 

My problem is that I am based in the UK, and would be more confident working only with UK clients, or clients in territories whose legal systems are very closely based on the UK.  I don't feel it would be fair to put in for jobs in the US unless they are very generic e.g. draft me a hire agreement or something which is entirely mutual and doesnt need reference to anything outside the party's obligations to each other.

 

But there doesn't seem to a way to filter US and UK based jobs, unless I am missing something?  If not, I don't think I'm going to put much time into pursuing this on here.  It's a shame as I love contract law, but I would end up throwing proposal credits at jobs I am not really qualified for.  Smiley Sad  Do let me know if there is any way to search for jobs in specific territories!  Am I being silly again?  ta x

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Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
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2 of 7

@Naomi J wrote:

Hi all, thank you for being a lovely helpful forum.

 

<snip>

 

But there doesn't seem to a way to filter US and UK based jobs, unless I am missing something?  If not, I don't think I'm going to put much time into pursuing this on here.  It's a shame as I love contract law, but I would end up throwing proposal credits at jobs I am not really qualified for.  Smiley Sad  Do let me know if there is any way to search for jobs in specific territories!  Am I being silly again?  ta x


Your welcome Smiley Happy  It's nice to see properly worded question posts too, ya know Smiley Happy

 

Anyways, to simply answer your question: there is no way to filter by country. We USED to have this filter, and I DEEPLY miss it. Mods have been un-reponsive about possibly brining this filter back.

 

Having said this, you could arrange a job feed like so:

 

  • type something like: legal-task UK in the search bar (or via advanced search if that generates more targeted results)
  • now filter THOSE results based on the other options like Category, Job Type, Client History etc.
  • save this feed, and monitor it for a few days
  • if neccesary, make edits to the task name or other filters as needed

View solution in original post

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Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
3 of 7

No, you're not being silly! And no, there currently isn't such a facilty, you'd have to look at the client's country (which does not always show yet with new clients)

 

You could use UK or British in more refined searches? There probably won't be that many, but you'd be quite uniquely qualified for them and win a decent percentage of them?

 

PS - in my client account I can filter right down to individual countries when searching for freelancers by the way....

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Community Guru
Ela K Member Since: Feb 9, 2015
4 of 7

@Naomi J wrote:

 

 However, I also have a law degree and experience writing policy for small organisations, debt chasing letters, and other such fun things.  I like this sort of thing even more.

 

My problem is that I am based in the UK, and would be more confident working only with UK clients, or clients in territories whose legal systems are very closely based on the UK.  I don't feel it would be fair to put in for jobs in the US unless they are very generic e.g. draft me a hire agreement or something which is entirely mutual and doesnt need reference to anything outside the party's obligations to each other.

 

 

Hi Naomi,

 

I feel your 'pain'. At least to some degree...

I am a lawyer, too and got my law degree in Germany (civil-law system). I also studied Anglo-American law. Now, correct me if I got this completely wrong - but are the differences in common-law countries really that big? Particularly in contract law?

 

I have worked for UK employers and advised them on contracts, though I really am not that familiar with the common-law system. But that's the beauty of contract law, isn't it? As far as I am concerned, there are far less restrictions in common law - in a civil-law system everything is spelled out. Which makes me quite hesitant to work for clients from other countries with a substantially different understanding of the legal system as well. 

 

I shall gladly be educated on this matter. And I really mean that.

Maybe I've got it all wrong. 

 

Best,

Ela

 

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Community Leader
Naomi J Member Since: May 15, 2015
5 of 7

 Hi Ela,

 

I also studied German Civil Law for a year, in German!  Which got a bit tiring, and there was only one other rather odd guy in the class, so I'm afraid I dropped that module, although it was very interesting.

 

I haven't done much comparative study of contract law between the US and UK, but believe there are different forms of action for chasing debt, which would probably be at least a significant factor in the sort of freelance work which might come up on here.  I am also quite happy with UK employment law, but the US would again be totally different (probably less of it, lol.)

 

Countries which seem much further away from the UK in culture often have much more similar legal systems, because they were former colonies (for which we are truly sorry) and haven't had the same period of time or confidence with which to diverge from UK precedents and statute.  Some of these countries still have our Privy Council as their final court of appeal. 

 

I guess in comparison to the differences between codified and common law systems, the US and UK are fairly similar, and they do operate on the same logic.  But in practice they are very different.  UK, Canadian and Australian courts will often consider each other's latest ruling when searching for relevant precedent , but we have to be really plumbing the depths of despair to look to the US courts for inspiration, and their rulings are considered less authoritative than Aus/Canada because they are so different.

 

Ooh I got a bit rambly there!  I wonder if anyone else has a view?  I expect an American lawyer might have a slightly different take on how we view their rulings... but it would be interesting to hear how a standard action for debt goes through which courts etc.

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Community Leader
Naomi J Member Since: May 15, 2015
6 of 7

Thanks both for your suggestions re: searching.  I will try putting UK/British/English in the search terms.  English law is actually quite different to Scottish law, and the other subsidiaries are sometimes allowed to make their own rules too.  So really I suppose I should search for English law.

 

You'd think it would be a real niche, but there do seem to be quite a lot of contract law oriented jobs on here, reviewing/drafting/advising on the drawing up of agreements.  This isnt surprising really, as people just need these documents to work, and they dont necessarily need to be written by a lawyer to function for business and hold water if need be.  WIth the increasing amount of online legal agreements being made, some folks might even be able to choose which legal system they use.

 

Tis very confusing.  I think I will wait for that magic job which says 'English law graduate required'

 

Thanks Smiley Happy

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Community Leader
Naomi J Member Since: May 15, 2015
7 of 7

Another thing occured to me whilst geeking out over this: the UK now has millions of statutes (OK maybe not milions, but it has grown exponentially over the last few decades) so very little is left open to common law, outside funny fields like equity.  Many of these statutes have been updated or added since we joined the EU/ECHR.  So many areas like commercial and employment law will now have more in common with Germany than the US.

 

But as I am only a recent graduate and my work experience is in the charity sector, I am probably just not as confident as I would be if I had had a 'proper' job of work in law.

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