eric5037
Member

Are a lot of little projects better than a few bigger ones?

Hi, 

 

That's a question I've been asking myself for a long time so I have to ask here and see point of views. 

I have a great who gives me ongoing jobs. Those are little jobs (average of 50$). 

 

He's just given me 6 jobs and I've done 2, so I have 4 left. Let's say 200$.

 

What do you think is better? 4 contracts of 50$ or 1 contract of 200$?

 

I think that little ones are better. It's may be psychological like "you're doing a lot of jobs" but I tend to think that when they have to choose, clients will more likely choose someone, not only with a great JSS but with a lot of jobs.

 

In terms of JSS, I think it's absolutely the same but only if things go well. If they don't, it's easy to think that, for example, if a 80% of the work has been perfectly made but the remaining 20% fails, the private feedback could be awful and the JSS badly hurt (that depending of course on the number of jobs done until now). 

 

Basically, it's not a problem with that client because he asks me if I can do something, I run test and I tell him if I can and then I do the work with no contract at all (trust is key!) and when the job's done, I just send it to him asking him for what I consider a fair price.

 

What do you think?

 

8 REPLIES 8
petra_r
Member


@Eric B wrote:

That's a question I've been asking myself for a long time so I have to ask here and see point of views. 

I have a great who gives me ongoing jobs. Those are little jobs (average of 50$). 

 

He's just given me 6 jobs and I've done 2, so I have 4 left. Let's say 200$.

 

What do you think is better? 4 contracts of 50$ or 1 contract of 200$?


 It depends on your goal. I like sizeable and long term contracts, and take small fry (under $ 1000) for a change and if I really like what the client is after and by invite only, if I have spare time.

 

If your goal is big contracts then having a profile with only small stuff it might put the cllients with the big contracts off to see you work only on on small stuff.

 

If you like quick "get in and get out" contracts and your profile shown only long term relationships, clients with small contracts might feel you'd not look twice at them and their little contracts.

 

Personally I like switching it up.

Some small stuff, some huge stuff, some in between stuff.

 


Eric B wrote: he asks me if I can do something, I run test and I tell him if I can and then I do the work with no contract at all (trust is key!) and when the job's done, I just send it to him asking him for what I consider a fair price.

 That is nuts, no way to run a business and will bite you in the butt eventually.



Eric B wrote: he asks me if I can do something, I run test and I tell him if I can and then I do the work with no contract at all (trust is key!) and when the job's done, I just send it to him asking him for what I consider a fair price.

 That is nuts, no way to run a business and will bite you in the butt eventually.


With little contracts, it shouldn't be a big deal! I wouldn't do that with big contracts.

That being said, it works perfectly with that client.


@Eric B wrote:


That being said, it works perfectly with that client.


 Until it doesn't 😉

 


@Petra R wrote:

@Eric B wrote:


That being said, it works perfectly with that client.


 Until it doesn't 😉


 Smiley LOL yeah! well, if it happens, I willl have lost 50$, not the end of the world!

Eric, I recently learned the hard way that small jobs are probably safer than one with many milestones. After completing a large number of milestones to client satisfaction -- otherwise, he wouldn't have kept adding milestones -- we had a disagreement about the last, so the client closed the contract and rated me on the last milestone essentially, and my JSS took a hit, but I learned a lesson.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce


@John K wrote:

Eric, I recently learned the hard way that small jobs are probably safer than one with many milestones. After completing a large number of milestones to client satisfaction -- otherwise, he wouldn't have kept adding milestones -- we had a disagreement about the last, so the client closed the contract and rated me on the last milestone essentially, and my JSS took a hit, but I learned a lesson.


 Thanks, John. It's very good to know!

 

This is what I was talking about before: bad private feedback for just 1 bad milestone. 

Does not cost the client any more money to create a new contract instead of a new milestone.

 

I don't like the idea that my success or failure with one milestone might reflect poorly on a bunch of previously concluded successful milestones.

 

So I rarely work multi-milestone contracts. I prefer each milestone to be its own contract.


@Preston H wrote:

Does not cost the client any more money to create a new contract instead of a new milestone.

 

I don't like the idea that my success or failure with one milestone might reflect poorly on a bunch of previously concluded successful milestones.

 

So I rarely work multi-milestone contracts. I prefer each milestone to be its own contract.


Thanks, Preston. 

Creating new projects doesn't cost more money, just a little bit of work, not a lot!!

 

multi-milestones contracts are to be avoided because it's what you're saying (and you're not the only one!): I don't like the idea that my success or failure with one milestone might reflect poorly on a bunch of previously concluded successful milestones.

 

Will the client think: that 5th milestone has not been done correctly so I will make a private feedback with a 4. I don't think so.