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Are the skill tests "open-book" tests?

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Active Member
Anupam J Member Since: Oct 26, 2016
1 of 21

Sorry if this sounds like a dumb question but are the skill tests "open-book"? i.e Is it ok to search on Google to look up stuff (for example, exact usage/syntax of something) while we are taking the tests. Dont think the rules say anything about that but I saw on two different third-party web sites that its ok to do that, but wanted to double check.

 

thanks

Anupam

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Community Guru
Zoltán N Member Since: Jul 23, 2015
2 of 21

Hi Anupam,

What would be the meaning of the tests if you would just google for the answers? Testing your searching skills?

"Dont think the rules say anything about that"

It is not specifically about the rules - but about ethics.

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Active Member
Anupam J Member Since: Oct 26, 2016
3 of 21

A lot of coding tests in developer interviews are really like that, where you could refer to the web whenever needed. They are not testing your "searching skills" but testing your analytical skills (remembering the 'syntax' or 'usage' doesnt matter as much in programming as much as 'applying' the concepts).

A more courteous answer would have been helpful in forums like these.

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Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 21

Anupam:

No.

The skills test are not "open-book."


If you want to cheat on the tests, I don't know if there is anything I can do to stop you.

 

But if you cheat, you won't be able to compare your results to my results and the results of other test-takers who don't cheat.

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Anupam J Member Since: Oct 26, 2016
5 of 21

Preston: Thanks for your response. I never said I wanted to cheat. Was only checking whats legit since it wasnt completely clear to me (as I explained earlier). If the intention was to cheat, I wouldnt have needed to ask this question on the forum anyways.

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Community Guru
Kathy T Member Since: Jul 17, 2015
6 of 21

@anupam J wrote:

A lot of coding tests in developer interviews are really like that, where you could refer to the web whenever needed. They are not testing your "searching skills" but testing your analytical skills (remembering the 'syntax' or 'usage' doesnt matter as much in programming as much as 'applying' the concepts).

A more courteous answer would have been helpful in forums like these.


 

As I replied to another poster's discussion. - there is nothing discourteous with the answer Zoltan (and other freelancers) gave to you. You've asked a question and it was answered both professionally and courteously. Freelancers should stop asking questions if they accuse NICELY answered replies as discourteous or disrespectful. Believe me, if you get a "snarky" answer, you'll know it.

 

And I will add to the COURTEOUS replies. - NO, tests are not open book tests nor are they search the internet for answers tests. They are to test your knowledge and skills.  Unfortunately these test have lost that ability as freelancers have used an open book approach by searching the internet for answers.

 

You can have ethics and morals, or not. Us freelancers and Upwork itself won't stop you, If freelancers continue to "cheat" and YES it is cheating, these tests will mean absolutely nothing to potential clients who DO know who cheated and who didn't (there are ways of telling depending on the test taken)

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Moderator
Valeria K Moderator Member Since: Mar 6, 2014
7 of 21

Hi Anupam,

 

Tests are meant to be taken by an individual without consulting online or written notes and searching for answers on the Internet. Please, refer to this help article for more information about testing requirements.

~ Valeria
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Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
8 of 21

As one of the most ethical—even scrupulous—people you will ever "meet," I dissent.

 

I look things up all the time when I'm working, and manage to do so at a professional pace for professional rates.

 

There is no reason—certainly an ethical one—not to approach tests in the same way, other than a practical one: I'd **bleep** well better know where to look and what I'm looking for, or I'll time out. Unless, of course, I'm simply looking at a crib sheet, in which case I might finish in record time. Those are two quite different approaches to test taking. The second is cheating. The first, I submit, is not.

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Kathy T Member Since: Jul 17, 2015
9 of 21

@Douglas Michael M wrote:

As one of the most ethical—even scrupulous—people you will ever "meet," I dissent.

 

I look things up all the time when I'm working, and manage to do so at a professional pace for professional rates.

 

There is no reason—certainly an ethical one—not to approach tests in the same way, other than a practical one: I'd **bleep** well better know where to look and what I'm looking for, or I'll time out. Unless, of course, I'm simply looking at a crib sheet, in which case I might finish in record time. Those are two quite different approaches to test taking. The second is cheating. The first, I submit, is not.


 Sorry, I disagree with your statements. Looking something up while working it totally different then measuring your skills and understanding of  something by taking a test. If I agreed with your statement, then everyone, from 1st grade to grad school should be able to look up the answers on the internet or from an open book when taking ANY test. And that goes for all kinds of tests from school/academic to certifications and even tests to get your drivers license.

 

 

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Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
10 of 21

@Kathy T wrote:

...Looking something up while working it totally different then measuring your skills and understanding of  something by taking a test. If I agreed with your statement, then everyone, from 1st grade to grad school should be able to look up the answers on the internet or from an open book when taking ANY test.

 

You say that as if it were a bad thing.


And that goes for all kinds of tests from school/academic to certifications and even tests to get your drivers license.

 

No, it doesn't. I don't want drivers or surgeons looking things up while they operate a motor vehicle or on me. So yes, they should be tested on knowledge they are required to have, without reference, while performing the task on which they are being tested.

On the other hand, when my primary care physician looks things up before say, prescribing a drug or making a referral, I breathe a sigh of relief to know I'm not in the hands of a know-it-all.


 

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