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dave_alt_delete
Community Member

Attach Fanart to Proposals?

I was wanting to show someone my character design skills, and one prominent example I have is turnarounds of FNAF Security Breach characters as 80's/90's Saturday morning heroes. 

 

Would it be illegal to attach these to a proposal? Sorry for the dumb question.

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researchediting
Community Member

If your current illustrations differ substantially in style from your models, and you place them in context, e.g. "X rendered as Y," you're probably OK legally (says this nonlawyer).

 

As previously suggested, I think the more pressing problem is that unless you're responding to some specific niche need of a potential client, you want to be presenting art that is both fully rendered and fully original. Your actual marketing issue overshadows your hypothetical legal one.

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prestonhunter
Community Member

David:

I can think of no conceivable scenario in which you would run into a problem if you attached fan art to a proposal.

 

In fact, I recommend that you delete the files you attached to your original post and just keep on keeping on.

Delete them? Why? Is it actually against the rules after all, or just so they don't get stolen (ironic as that sounds).

tarrier-design
Community Member

I have no idea what  FNAF is... so I if I was looking for an artist an saw it.. I wouldn'tnow.

Buy why not do original characters, and also fully render/color the characters too? Each week do a character. Each week you add one more original design. Add back grounds... make tempaltes/branding that show you are series. Build your portfolio with quality art. 

I know I can just draw original characters, but considering I had fanart in a particular case, I wondered if there was anything I can legally do with them.

researchediting
Community Member

If your current illustrations differ substantially in style from your models, and you place them in context, e.g. "X rendered as Y," you're probably OK legally (says this nonlawyer).

 

As previously suggested, I think the more pressing problem is that unless you're responding to some specific niche need of a potential client, you want to be presenting art that is both fully rendered and fully original. Your actual marketing issue overshadows your hypothetical legal one.

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