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Client Avoiding to Create New Milestone Work

Hi Everyone!

 

I'm currently working with a client who initially had a very low bugdet when we started working together. I was clear with him about my rates and we came to a mutual agreement about a rate. At that time, he had already hired me and had funded $35 to the first milestone.

 

As per our agreement, he released that milestone as soon as I submitted the first draft of work for review. Followed by that he sent me a set of revisions he would like. I addressed the revisions proposed as well as sent him an email (before and after submission of the revisions) requesting him to create a new milestone for the remaining payment.

 

Despite my emails, he tended to ignore my request and sent me a second round of revisions to attend to. This time, I refused to proceed and requested him to update the milestone on upwork first as per upwork's escrow protection system. 

 

He sent me an email saying that as per our agreement he will only fund the payment after the work is completed and since the work is urgent I should continue on it. He also asked me to send through a styleguide about the designs and work produced.

 

My insticts tell me not to trust this person. Our initial agreement stated that he would pay me $35 upon submission of the first draft (which he did since the milestone was already created) and the second upon completion of the task. However, he doesn't want to produce a milestone on Upwork.

 

What do you suggest I should do and how should I deal with this? My main concern is my feedback to be honest and I'm afraid this financial bickering is going to effect it. The reason why I proceeded to work with this client is because he said he agreed to my terms - moreover the first milestone was already funded even before we started working together so that made it secure for me.

 

I'd really appreciate your valuable feedback!

 

Kindest Regards,

Nandita

7 REPLIES 7
prestonhunter
Member

This client can not be trusted to use fixed-price contracts.

 

Stop doing anything else for the client.

 

Submit your work using the milestone submission.

 

Then do no further work.

 

If the client asks for anything, explain that you will be happy to do that work after the current work has been paid for and the contract has been closed.

 

Do not accept any further work from the client until the contract has been closed. By him. And you have verified that he has given you positive feedback.

 

Then, if the client wants you to do more work, he may open an hourly contract with you.

jsutherland
Member

Your profile shows you have 4 jobs in progress and they are all hourly jobs.

 

Is the job you are talking about a fixed price job that is not showing as part of your jobs in progress?

Preston's opinions seem to be in order, however it will not be that simple so prepare yourself.

 

Let the client know that the order of business on the platform is "fund milestone first, then work proceeds;" this is Upwork's policy, not yours. And you are not going to  break the policies. Stick to this.

---- easy like Sunday morning ----
arens
Member

 


@Nandita D wrote:

Hi Everyone!

 

I'm currently working with a client who initially had a very low bugdet when we started working together. I was clear with him about my rates and we came to a mutual agreement about a rate. At that time, he had already hired me and had funded $35 to the first milestone.

 

As per our agreement, he released that milestone as soon as I submitted the first draft of work for review. Followed by that he sent me a set of revisions he would like. I addressed the revisions proposed as well as sent him an email (before and after submission of the revisions) requesting him to create a new milestone for the remaining payment.

 

Despite my emails, he tended to ignore my request and sent me a second round of revisions to attend to. This time, I refused to proceed and requested him to update the milestone on upwork first as per upwork's escrow protection system. 

 

He sent me an email saying that as per our agreement he will only fund the payment after the work is completed and since the work is urgent I should continue on it. He also asked me to send through a styleguide about the designs and work produced.

 

My insticts tell me not to trust this person. Our initial agreement stated that he would pay me $35 upon submission of the first draft (which he did since the milestone was already created) and the second upon completion of the task. However, he doesn't want to produce a milestone on Upwork.

 

What do you suggest I should do and how should I deal with this? My main concern is my feedback to be honest and I'm afraid this financial bickering is going to effect it. The reason why I proceeded to work with this client is because he said he agreed to my terms - moreover the first milestone was already funded even before we started working together so that made it secure for me.

 

I'd really appreciate your valuable feedback!

 

Kindest Regards,

Nandita


 You should write to support and tell them the situation.
Client is asking for work not included in the first milestone. Client is forcing me to do it if not he will put a low feedback. I'm sure they can directly stop the contract and remove the ability of client to write feedback for you. You should have proofs though.

However if you didn't finish the the job for the first milestone (revisions included) then the client has all the right in this world to ask for it to get done. They paid you the milestone but maybe the job was not done right. Revisions mean you send a perfect work or with minimum of errors.
If you don't submit the work I'm sure that the client will send a negative feedback. 

Nandita, I am a serious professional. I know what I am doing. If I agree to work on a client's behalf, it is because I know how to do the job.

My clients know that when I submit a fixed price project to them, the project is done.

They can pay or not pay, but I have no time for games.

My clients pay when I ask them to pay. They don't ask for work outside what was originally agreed upon. If they need new work done, they set up a new contract.

Only you can decide if you are this type of contractor.

Having clear boundaries and ground rules and expectations with clients eliminates a lot of game playing and time wasting.

But even if you aren't yet at a point where you can afford to be that strict with your clients, no contractor deserves to be abused by clients, and that's what it is -- fixed-price abuse -- when a client has you doing endless amounts of new work or revisions without paying you more.

$35.00 is a small pittance. That's what a client can expect to pay me for a half-hour Skype call or to have me answer a few questions via email. You should not be spending many hours and days doing revisions for a $35.00 fixed-price contract... I don't care how new you are or how modestly-priced you are.


@Preston H wrote:
$35.00 is a small pittance. That's what a client can expect to pay me for a half-hour Skype call or to have me answer a few questions via email. You should not be spending many hours and days doing revisions for a $35.00 fixed-price contract... I don't care how new you are or how modestly-priced you are.

 35 may be a small value, but the contractor did accept it. Once you accept a job and agree on the price, it is your responsability to deliver a good work. If the client ask for revisions it mean that the job is not done as it should. What else may it mean? If the client is asking revisions for other things not included in the job description, then you shouldn't accept to do it. Simple like that.

Arens, I agree with what you are saying.

I think where we see things differently in this incident is you think that the contractor may have not finished the original task, and I am assuming the contractor finished the task and is being asked to do more.

I'm not really talking about this specific incident, because I don't have all the details and don't know both sides of the story.

But, yes, I agree with the basic concept that even if the amount is small, a contractor should finish the job before being paid.

The more nuanced understanding I may push, that you may or may not agree with is that a $35 fixed-price contract entitles a client to receive the work agreed upon, not necessarily the work done with endless revisions until it matches the client's ultimate vision.

That is what an hourly contract is for.