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Client Invite Limitations

Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
21 of 28

I posted the same thing concerning Connects cost being based on client budget/project parameters. This is a fool's errand. There is zero accountability for what is posted by a client in this regard. A client can post a budget of $50k and wind up doing the project for $1k. Similarly, the project can show a low budget but the outcome can actually be many many times that which was shown originally. Selecting project length is  a complete joke in certain job circles. Client's often have no idea (nor is it expected they would) as they are sourcing in areas far from their primary expertise. Additionally, one client's "high" budget is another's low budget. The concept of what constitutes "Expert" from "Entry Level" and what is a high hourly versus low is both regionally based and incredibly subjective. 

 

It's going to be interesting to see client reaction to this as we already know freelancer reaction. I wonder what kind of education there will be when it comes to setting project parameters. Many good clients not knowing how to accurately gauge time/cost will find far less quality freelancers are applying because the freelancer will now pay. Before we may have taken the risk in hopes of engaging in conversation and educating the client on what's realistic. Not anymore (or in far lower numbers). Invite limits, based on self-provided answers with no accountability, will be manipulated as Petra mentioned. 

Community Guru
Jessica S Member Since: Dec 4, 2015
22 of 28

Scott B wrote:

I posted the same thing concerning Connects cost being based on client budget/project parameters. This is a fool's errand. There is zero accountability for what is posted by a client in this regard. A client can post a budget of $50k and wind up doing the project for $1k. Similarly, the project can show a low budget but the outcome can actually be many many times that which was shown originally. Selecting project length is  a complete joke in certain job circles. Client's often have no idea (nor is it expected they would) as they are sourcing in areas far from their primary expertise. Additionally, one client's "high" budget is another's low budget. The concept of what constitutes "Expert" from "Entry Level" and what is a high hourly versus low is both regionally based and incredibly subjective. 

 

It's going to be interesting to see client reaction to this as we already know freelancer reaction. I wonder what kind of education there will be when it comes to setting project parameters. Many good clients not knowing how to accurately gauge time/cost will find far less quality freelancers are applying because the freelancer will now pay. Before we may have taken the risk in hopes of engaging in conversation and educating the client on what's realistic. Not anymore (or in far lower numbers). Invite limits, based on self-provided answers with no accountability, will be manipulated as Petra mentioned. 


 

This is so important. I can't imagine that Upwork leadership has not thought of this? Most of my clients tell me they have no idea how much the going rate is for the work. I have had many clients pay me $450 on a $100 budget job.

 

Has Upwork management considered that the best freelancers paying for connects likely won't waste their money/connects on these jobs despite that they can be quite lucrative?  You would be chasing off potentially good clients if they can only invite 3 and no or only low-level freelancers apply because they put in too low of a budget by mistake. I can't tell you how many times I responded to invites saying, "I would be happy to help but I can't do this for $100" and how many times someone came back saying "I know, I just had to put something in, can you price this for me?".  

 

But! Sometimes, they truly are only willing to pay $100. I would NEVER know unless I talked to the client. However.... If I saw that job in my job feed for $100 and had to PAY to apply, I would skip it for sure. It wouldn't be worth the money to find out that they can only pay $100.  This is why limiting invites AND paying for connects based on job length and budget CAN NEVER WORK.  This is the NORM.. not the exception.

Community Leader
Kelly B Member Since: Jan 1, 2016
23 of 28

I just don't understand. The way Upwork makes money is for clients to come here and hire good freelancers. The easier (and faster and cheaper) Upwork makes it for the client to FIND the good freelancer in the first place, the greater the chances that the client will continue to use Upwork.

 

A quick google search says Upwork has 6 MILLION freelancers? And out of that pool they're going to recommend 6 freelancers, 5 of whom may not even respond? That's just nonsensical. Fix the algorithm or train your talent specialists better, but it behooves you to do everything you can to "connect" clients with good freelancers.

Community Guru
Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
24 of 28

I just received 1 of 220 invitations to a dodgy job. (Posting Amazon reviews. Job advertised at $75 fixed price, but client has always paid  $5 on previous similar jobs.)

 

Since this wasn't a Plus or Featured job, I assume the new-ish invitation limits don't apply to pre-existing clients. Is that going to change?

 

P.S. If the goal is to reduce the number of unwanted invitations (which I welcome), please consider applying filters to invitations. I wouldn't have received this invitation if my job feed filters had been applied.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
25 of 28

Richard W wrote:

I just received 1 of 220 invitations to a dodgy job. (Posting Amazon reviews. )


I hope you flagged it - those are not allowed on Upwork!

Community Guru
Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
26 of 28

Petra R wrote:

Richard W wrote:

I just received 1 of 220 invitations to a dodgy job. (Posting Amazon reviews. )


I hope you flagged it - those are not allowed on Upwork!


I did. In fact I was unable to reply to it, as it had apparently been closed already. It's certainly shown as Closed in my proposal archive. But I can see that the number of invitations has now risen to 246. Maybe that's just a time lag thing.

 

This client has been posting similar jobs since January, and has made over 100 hires on them (mostly at $5 each). I suppose it's an easy 5* review, whatever the money.

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
27 of 28

Jennifer M wrote:

To echo some others, I don't think basing it on client posted budget will work either. 

 

And really, how does that make sense, anyway? Is it less important to find the right freelancer for a small job than a large one? Is the response rate from freelancers higher on invitations to small jobs? Are we ignoring the fact that clients often start with a small job that turns into a long-term relationship, and making it harder for them to find the right freelancer is detrimental to what Upwork describes as its goal?

Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
28 of 28

Echoing the thoughts of many - charging different amount  of connects to bid on jobs won't work. For all the reasons mentioned plus some.  Charge a flat 2 connects per bid and be done with it.  

 

As far as playing a similar game with the number of invites a buyer can issue - the same holds true.

6 is much better than 3 but 10 is more reasonable from a buyer's POV.  The number of invites any client can issue for any job needs to be standard - across the  board.

 

Just as an aside:  Implementing both of the above leaves a  LOT LESS room for screw-ups.

 

 

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