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Re: Client asked to work after she paused the contract

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Vyacheslav B Member Since: Nov 15, 2018
1 of 18

My client paused the contract (per hour) and then sent me a draft (I did it) to revise without resuming the contract. What should I do? As far as I remember, I'm not supposed to work for free. 

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Miriam H Member Since: May 16, 2017
2 of 18

Vyacheslav B wrote:

My client paused the contract (per hour) and then sent me a draft (I did it) to revise without resuming the contract. What should I do? As far as I remember, I'm not supposed to work for free. 


I believe the only path to being paid would be to request a bonus payment for the amount of time spent working (if you are hourly manual time would not be protected).

 

You may have to forget about the money.

 

That said, if the client sends you additional work, DO NOT DO ANYTHING UNTIL the contract is active again.

 

If/when the contract ends, IF the client doesn't pay you for the time worked "off the clock" consider leaving it in the comments to let other freelancers know. (This advice may not be popular) 

 

 

 

 

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Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
3 of 18

That is great advice, Miriam.

 

As long as the client was aware she was asking for work she didn't intend to pay for, every freelancer who considers working for in the future should know about it.

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Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 18

Vyacheslav:

It is a violation of Upwork ToS for a client to ask a freelancer to work for free.

 

Also, it defies common sense, doesn't it? Would YOU ever do something like this?


What if you have a yard with a large lawn. It needs to be mowed every week, or you will be fined by the city. (At last that's what happens in my city!)

 

And what if you paid a teenager from the neighborhood $10 per week to mow your lawn. Would you tell him:

"Robert: I'm not going to pay you any more. I'm putting a pause on that. But you need to keep coming over and mowing the lawn every week."

 

Who would do that?

And do you think that Robert would keep mowing the lawn?

I don't know... Maybe he's really nice and feels sorry for you and keeps coming over.

But he certainly isn't obligated to. And we'll never know if he would mow your lawn for free, because you are not the kind of person who would ask him to.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
5 of 18

Personally, I believe there are two types of "revisions"

 

1. Revisions that mean fixing mistakes made in the original work. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created 4 blue dogs, or 4 pinks cats with 5 legs each, or 7 stick insects. The client asked to get that changed to 5 pink cats.

 

2. Revisions that result from the client changing the scope. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created a competent drawing of 5 pink cats, the client changed their mind and decided they'd rather have 17 green ferrets in watercolour.

 

In scenario 1. the client is not being unreasonable to expect to get what they have already paid for.

In scenario 2. the client is asking for free work.

 

I once translated an article into the wrong language (my fault, wasn't paying attention) on an hourly contract. I obviously didn't expect to log the time for translating into the correct language.

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Miriam H Member Since: May 16, 2017
6 of 18

Petra R wrote:

Personally, I believe there are two types of "revisions"

 

1. Revisions that mean fixing mistakes made in the original work. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created 4 blue dogs, or 4 pinks cats with 5 legs each, or 7 stick insects. The client asked to get that changed to 5 pink cats.

 

2. Revisions that result from the client changing the scope. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created a competent drawing of 5 pink cats, the client changed their mind and decided they'd rather have 17 green ferrets in watercolour.

 

In scenario 1. the client is not being unreasonable to expect to get what they have already paid for.

In scenario 2. the client is asking for free work.

 

I once translated an article into the wrong language (my fault, wasn't paying attention) on an hourly contract. I obviously didn't expect to log the time for translating into the correct language.


Good point, I was assuming scenario 2, however I should NEVER assume....particularly not on this forum!

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Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
7 of 18

Petra added a great point about 2 different types of "revisions."

 

A professional freelancer SHOULD be willing to fix mistakes (such as the example Petra provided) without logging time. That's good customer service. That is ethical.

 

But a professional freelancer will be able to do that without the client pausing the contract.

 

As far as assumptions about the original poster's situation:
I look at this way: The Community Forum is not the same as a dedicated Customer Support chat session between an Upwork rep and a user. Threads in the Forum are dual purpose: They can be used to answer a specific individual's questions, but also used to inform and educate other people who read them.

 

It is useful to discuss topics in a thread such as this one, even if we don't have all the details. If answers don't fully apply to the writer of a post, that person can provide additional details. But the discussion about the topic is still useful.

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Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
8 of 18

Petra R wrote:

Personally, I believe there are two types of "revisions"

 

1. Revisions that mean fixing mistakes made in the original work. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created 4 blue dogs, or 4 pinks cats with 5 legs each, or 7 stick insects. The client asked to get that changed to 5 pink cats.

 

2. Revisions that result from the client changing the scope. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created a competent drawing of 5 pink cats, the client changed their mind and decided they'd rather have 17 green ferrets in watercolour.

 

In scenario 1. the client is not being unreasonable to expect to get what they have already paid for.

In scenario 2. the client is asking for free work.

 

I once translated an article into the wrong language (my fault, wasn't paying attention) on an hourly contract. I obviously didn't expect to log the time for translating into the correct language.


There is a third type that every revision request I have ever received falls into--something along the lines of "These 5 pink cats look great, but I think they'd be ever cuter with eyelashes. Could you add those?"

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Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
9 of 18

Tiffany S wrote:


There is a third type that every revision request I have ever received falls into--something along the lines of "These 5 pink cats look great, but I think they'd be ever cuter with eyelashes. Could you add those?"


"Sure! Great idea!! Let's add  eyelashes! That would work out at $ XXX - why don't you release the the funds for the current milestone and then set up a new milestone for $ XXX for the eyelashes?"

 

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Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
10 of 18

 If eyelashes are not specified in the original written agreement, then a client asking for eyelashes constitutes asking for free work. Such a request can be handled politely and professionally, as Petra demonstrated.

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