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Client asked to work after she paused the contract

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Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
11 of 18

Petra R wrote:

Tiffany S wrote:


There is a third type that every revision request I have ever received falls into--something along the lines of "These 5 pink cats look great, but I think they'd be ever cuter with eyelashes. Could you add those?"


"Sure! Great idea!! Let's add  eyelashes! That would work out at $ XXX - why don't you release the the funds for the current milestone and then set up a new milestone for $ XXX for the eyelashes?"

 


That's more of a business model question than a right way and wrong way kind of question. I include one round of revisions in my fixed price contracts, and adding eyelashes would definitely fall into that category. Honestly, even if there weren't a revision included, I probably wouldn't charge a client for the ten minutes it would take to add a couple of sentences (or eyelashes on a cat). 

 

I'm all for not working for free, but I think the advice from veterans in the forums goes a little far in the "Sure--on the heels of that complete project that took 6 hours and you paid me well for, please create a new milestone before I invest an additional six minutes in making a tiny change to the work."  There's a point at which making sure you get paid for every millisecond of work no matter how well paid you have been on the project just looks petty and unprofessional.

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Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
12 of 18

It's a hypothetical, used to illustrate a point.


A freelancer is welcome to use common sense and offer up great customer service.

 

But a client?

A cilent should feel dirty as sin if he asks a freelancer to work for free.

 

(Never mind the fact that asking a freelancer to work on your project for free is a bad business decision, no matter how wicked you are. Self-serving clients pay the people who work on their project, because they want the best results for the project.)

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Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
13 of 18

Tiffany S wrote:

Petra R wrote:

Personally, I believe there are two types of "revisions"

 

1. Revisions that mean fixing mistakes made in the original work. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created 4 blue dogs, or 4 pinks cats with 5 legs each, or 7 stick insects. The client asked to get that changed to 5 pink cats.

 

2. Revisions that result from the client changing the scope. Such as the contract was to draw 5 pink cats, the freelancer created a competent drawing of 5 pink cats, the client changed their mind and decided they'd rather have 17 green ferrets in watercolour.

 

In scenario 1. the client is not being unreasonable to expect to get what they have already paid for.

In scenario 2. the client is asking for free work.

 

I once translated an article into the wrong language (my fault, wasn't paying attention) on an hourly contract. I obviously didn't expect to log the time for translating into the correct language.


There is a third type that every revision request I have ever received falls into--something along the lines of "These 5 pink cats look great, but I think they'd be ever cuter with eyelashes. Could you add those?"

 

And do you?


 

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Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
14 of 18

Note that in the real world, most cats do not have eyelashes.

 

So an artist asked to draw a cat might indeed be expected to draw ears on a cat's head. But eyelashes would not be a normal thing to draw.

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Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
15 of 18

Preston H wrote:

Note that in the real world, most cats do not have eyelashes.

 

So an artist asked to draw a cat might indeed be expected to draw ears on a cat's head. But eyelashes would not be a normal thing to draw.


(I think) Tiffany was trying to inject a little bit of humor to the thread, that's all, but I'm now no longer sure if I'm in the real world.

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Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
16 of 18
Vyacheslav B wrote:

The other questions is - Am I eligible to end the contract that was paused by the client with no particular reason given to me? And how long should I wait before I can do it? I'm willing to finish the revision as it is relatively small.


You can obviously close a contract any time you like.

The client can react to that action in whatever way he or she feels is appropriate.

 

I think talking to the client so a mutually beneficial solution can be found is much better than any knee-jerk reactions.

 

In general, I believe in great customer service. Giving clients a little more than is strictly asked for is great customer service.


This could be sending an edited source text back along with the translation with a note saying "There were a couple of typos and some stray commas in the source text, so I've fixed those for you as I went along" or declining extra payment for a small out of scope task that takes literally a few minutes, when the client has already paid hundreds or thousands to me.

 

There is a fine line between "free work" and "customer service" and that fine line is different for everyone. It also depends on your rates. If you charge higher rates, you may well have already factored in a degree of "freebies" much like my favourite restaurant factors in the cost of the "free" prosecco at the start and the "free" liquors at the end of the meal.

 

I've had some incredibly kind clients and feel that being kind to such clients in return makes for a much more pleasant freelancing experience all round.

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Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
17 of 18

Petra R wrote:
Vyacheslav B wrote:

The other questions is - Am I eligible to end the contract that was paused by the client with no particular reason given to me? And how long should I wait before I can do it? I'm willing to finish the revision as it is relatively small.


You can obviously close a contract any time you like.

The client can react to that action in whatever way he or she feels is appropriate.

 

I think talking to the client so a mutually beneficial solution can be found is much better than any knee-jerk reactions.

 

In general, I believe in great customer service. Giving clients a little more than is strictly asked for is great customer service.


This could be sending an edited source text back along with the translation with a note saying "There were a couple of typos and some stray commas in the source text, so I've fixed those for you as I went along" or declining extra payment for a small out of scope task that takes literally a few minutes, when the client has already paid hundreds or thousands to me.

 

There is a fine line between "free work" and "customer service" and that fine line is different for everyone. It also depends on your rates. If you charge higher rates, you may well have already factored in a degree of "freebies" much like my favourite restaurant factors in the cost of the "free" prosecco at the start and the "free" liquors at the end of the meal.

 

I've had some incredibly kind clients and feel that being kind to such clients in return makes for a much more pleasant freelancing experience all round.


I agree, but it makes your reply to Tiffany's post about 'eyelashes'  look rather odd.

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Vyacheslav B Member Since: Nov 15, 2018
18 of 18

The other questions is - Am I eligible to end the contract that was paused by the client with no particular reason given to me? And how long should I wait before I can do it? I'm willing to finish the revision as it is relatively small but this is just a part of the project and, ironically, I'm one of the few specialists who are able to complete this type of project. (it is really that rare type related both to academic research, coding and knowledge of a thousand rules in specific field. 

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