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Client messed up, wants rewrite.

collintate
Active

My client needed five nurture emails written by an expereinced copywriter for a print advertising product for one of his agency clients. 

 

After accepting the job I found out the emails weren't for print advertising, they were for ads that are displayed in software programs. No big deal, I thought.

 

I asked my client tons of follow up questions to better understand the job and deliver the best results possible. The bulk of his replies were "I don't know", "I think so" or "sounds good".

 

Before writing all five emails, I sent a draft to make sure the tone and content of the copy matched what my client's client was looking for.

 

My client praised my writing skills and gave the green light to write the other emails.

 

I completed the emails and requested payment four days ago.

 

Yesterday my client asked if I would write copy for a related landing page. He promised to pay me extra, so I did. 

 

Tonight, I followed up to make sure that my client's client liked the emails. 

 

Feedback from my client's client was that "the emails target the wrong audience" and need to be rewritten.

 

My reason for asking preliminary questions was to avoid this exact situation, but here we are. 

 

The client offered to pay me double, for the work but can only pay me after he gets paid by his client.

 

I don't really have the time. My plate is completely full at the moment.

 

The ol' gut is telling me to request payment for the work I've already completed and decline to rewrite the series.

 

Any suggestions on how to proceed?

 

ACCEPTED SOLUTION
jolash
Community Guru

You will need to let the client know from previous communications that your work addressed the objectives initially specified. I bet he did not get his client's buy in before approving your work hence the negative feedback. He needs to deal with this issue and I am not sure you should continue working on a project with conflicting responses but if he really wants to work with you he should be willing to reward you for the initial work before asking for a new submission.

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12 REPLIES 12
lysis10
Community Guru
I've learned to specify 1 revision round only. It's saved me so many times. I still get screwed on occasion but it's reduced so many endless revision requests. It sets the tone for those flat rate jobs.

Thanks Jennifer!

 

Your "one revision round only" rule is a good one.

 

My client is the one who messed up, not me. So, am I within my UW freelancer rights to request payment for work I've already completed, even though it's directed at the wrong audience?

aocumen
Moderator
Moderator

Hi Collin, 

 

For fixed-price contracts, freelancers are not required by ToS to work on a milestone that they didn't agree to. The client needs to get a freelancer's consent before adding a new milestone. If the freelancer doesn't accept the added milestone, they can reject it by terminating the contract. I hope that the additional assignments you mentioned were added to your contract. 

 

Also, freelancers are not bound by the ToS to agree to changes that the client/s requests from their freelancer/s. If you do not agree with the revisions the client has been requesting from you, you can initiate a dispute for the escrow funds. 


~ Avery
Upwork

Thanks for the reply Avery. I'll keep this in mind for next time.

 

Unfortunately, I didn't have the client create additional assignments.

 

Will just have to see how this plays out. Man, oh man. Smiley Sad

 

jolash
Community Guru

You will need to let the client know from previous communications that your work addressed the objectives initially specified. I bet he did not get his client's buy in before approving your work hence the negative feedback. He needs to deal with this issue and I am not sure you should continue working on a project with conflicting responses but if he really wants to work with you he should be willing to reward you for the initial work before asking for a new submission.

Collin: your client's behavior is unacceptable.

When you submit completed work, the client should release payment.

If there are no revisions specified in the written agreement, he really should not ask for changes.

 

This is a client who you should only work with using an hourly contract. Because he neither understands nor respects the fixed-price contract model.

Fully agree with you Preston.

 

Also, I shouldn't have to request payment twice for work that has already been completed in line with his approval.

 

I'll be chatting with my client tonight and will let you know how things play out.

Thanks for the feedback Oreofe. I really appreciate it.

 

You're probably right. He likely didn't get his clients buy in before approving my work.

 

Last night I told him that I was too busy to rewrite the email series. He then acknowledged that he would have to do it himself and then signed out of chat.

 

He's back online now. I'm going to request full payment for the completed work.

 

I'll let you know how things go.

lysis10
Community Guru

I've been here a couple of times. It's a sticky situation. The problem is the "his client" thing. It's forced me to tell people that everyone has to get together and determine revisions for 1 round only, because you won't do revisions for every reviewer.

 

If he wants to pay you double, then why not pay your for the first round and escrow for the remaining amount. The hard part is that you didn't cover the revision process. I'm a b and even current clients get my lecture of 1 revision only for the price. That's cuz I've been through the arbitration process and it was part of the questions I got asked.

re: "The client offered to pay me double, for the work but can only pay me after he gets paid by his client."

 

Yes, well...

 

His promise to "pay you double" is worth exactly zero dollars and zero cents.

 

You can tell the client that I promise to grant him magical elf powers, but only after he pays you for the work you have done so far and stops monkeying around.

Exactly, Preston!

 

You can't deposit promises into a bank account.

 

I'm only giving hime one opportunity to do the right thing.

 

He's on Upwork Messenger right now. I'll let you know how the converstation goes.

 

 

I'm definitely adoping your rule of one revision per project, Jennifer.

 

Moving forward I will explicitly tell clients that they may have one revision.

 

If the work is being done for the client of my client, you better believe I'll be telling my guy/gal that "everyone has to get together and determine revisions for 1 round only" and that I "won't do revisions for every reviewer."

 

Thanks for the great feedback Jennifer. Super appreciative.

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