Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Client's Feedback

Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
11 of 19

I think in many cases people are so excited to get client interest that they choose to put blinders on and hope more for the good than the bad. You could see a lot of excuse making like the client's previous freelancer was at fault or it was a misunderstanding etc. When you want something bad enough you can rationalize almost anything. The fact is that you cannot legislate this behavior through algorithms nor is it always a matter of someone being stupid. It's a lack of experience coupled with the pressure to pay the bills that drives many people to overlook what they might not if reading about the client from someone else's experience. Look, even highly successful freelancers can take a misstep here for any number of reasons. Those that will be successful though aren't necessarily the one's that avoided bad clients but rather are the one's who learned from their misadventures and made incremental improvements as they moved forward. We really don't need a "system" to rescue us every time something bad happens. We can be more effective if we learn to rescue ourselves once in a while.  

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
12 of 19

Abinadab A wrote:

I think the solution is for Upwork to tweak the algorithm to make the Freelancer's feedback as important (or nearly as important)  as the client's feedback. It's not presently the case.


It is 100% as important as freelancers make it. There's nothing for Upwork to tweak--if freelancers paid as much attention to feedback as clients do, and if freelancers left honest feedback instead of lying to protect their own reputations, freelancer feedback would have at least as much impact as client feedback.

Community Guru
Abinadab A Member Since: Sep 26, 2016
13 of 19

Tiffany S wrote:


It is 100% as important as freelancers make it. There's nothing for Upwork to tweak--if freelancers paid as much attention to feedback as clients do, and if freelancers left honest feedback instead of lying to protect their own reputations, freelancer feedback would have at least as much impact as client feedback.


I don't think so.

Now let's forget freelancers' public feedback for a moment (clearly, many lie on it).

I don't know how much (if any) impact freelancer's private feedback has on the client's overall star rating.

If it had sufficient enough impact, clients would do everything possible to protect their reputations.

 

But we all know that a 1/10 on the private feedback to freelancer can bring down their JSS by 3 points or more.

In fact from my observations so far, I don't think our private feedback has any impact at all on client's star rating.

 

If it had good enough impact they would be less likely to act like dictators to ANY freelancer at all.

 

Reastically, from Scott's comments, it's clear that the scale can never be perfectly balanced. In fact I don't want it to be perfectly balanced. Clients should have slightly more power in the relationship - they should be in control. The clients have the money. Freelancers need it.

 

But the scale can come close to balanced with a few tweaks.

 

 

Community Guru
Robin H Member Since: May 28, 2019
14 of 19

Rohan S wrote:

I think clients are becoming more like a dictator. Everything is fine, they are so happy with work and then they make it 4 or below that. I mean, what kind of people are they ??
And moreover freelancers are totaly hepless here. Like how can a freelancer predicts that a all happy client is going to give him a bad feedback ?? Because we are always fair with them. 


Clients aren't becoming more like dictators.  If you feel this way, then you're letting them because you're charging too little for quality, hard work.  

 

And I agree with the others you're definitely not helpless.   You have CHOICES.  Choose to apply or not to apply.  Choose to accept the job or decline.  

 

How to prevent this kind of feedback in the future?

1) Read previous feedback! (as mentioned)

2) If the client haggles, move on.  They will be nightmare clients.  

3) Go with your gut.  If your conversation up to being offered the job is feeling icky, don't take the job. 

 

So there - not helpless at all. 

Community Guru
Jamie F Member Since: Mar 7, 2010
15 of 19

As a freelancer, the vast majority of my clients have been great to work with, and have left 5-star reviews.
As a client, I nearly always leave 5-star reviews for freelancers. It would take something significant for me to give less. 
That client in the OP's profile has to be among the worst client profiles I have seen. An atrocious history in terms of feedback both given and received. It's clear that the client is a bit of a ****, but you have to ask yourself why you went for the job, Rohan. 

Community Guru
Abinadab A Member Since: Sep 26, 2016
16 of 19

Jamie F wrote:

As a freelancer, the vast majority of my clients have been great to work with, and have left 5-star reviews.
As a client, I nearly always leave 5-star reviews for freelancers. It would take something significant for me to give less. 
That client in the OP's profile has to be among the worst client profiles I have seen. An atrocious history in terms of feedback both given and received. It's clear that the client is a bit of a ****, but you have to ask yourself why you went for the job, Rohan. 


 


I finally had a look; rather ugly client history there.

 

The OP can only hope thay the client's reputation is bad enough for Upwork to discount any bad feedback from that client from his next JSS calculation.

If this happens, then his working with that client can be said to have been a great decision.

If this doesn't happen, I'm afraid it would go down in his freelancing history as a stupid decision.

Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
17 of 19

We need to be careful here when discussing "power and control".  When there is a client/freelancer relationship (i.e. the contract) the power and control must be equal. What that means is that both have the exact same ability to walk away. Ultimately that is the only power that matters. If one side or another feels less capable of walking away, the power dynamic shifts and can then be misused. It is easy to think that the shift would be towards the client, but actually it is often towards the freelancer. Why? Depending on the nature of the job and the cost in terms of dollars and time may be very significant if the client were to try and take it to someone else. Yes the freelancer will give up potential income, but when faced with it, I think that is generally easier given you don't have that income yet where as the client has made a real investment. It will then be the client trying to see the good and overlooking the bad as maybe if they give the freelancer just one more week or say a few more nice words, their investment will have been recovered. 

 

From a platform perspective, it is very clear that the favorite child of Upwork is the client over the freelancer. The client is of course bringing the investment to the platform and any loss of clients is a 1:1 loss in terms of potential revenue. Not the same on the freelancer side as long as someone else can slide in and get that contract started. Clients will always be the more "important" customer of Upwork. Scarcity will ensure that.

 

The real power still lies with people willing to walk away. If a freelancer can evaluate any potential client feeling like it would be okay to walk away, then the client has no real power over them. The freelancer can then look at other reviews, the way in which the job description was written, the content of the interview, etc., to then make an uncoerced decision.  That's the kind of power you cannot outsource to anyone let alone a platform with an understandable bias. 

Ace Contributor
Rohan S Member Since: Mar 23, 2017
18 of 19

I think you didn't get it well. I said, if everything is well to go. Like client's previous feedback or his communication, dedication and approach...everything. I mean there is nothing wrong. And when the feedback time, they make it bad. Like I do it with you, you did a great job I also said it was great and then I give you 1 star just simply. What would you do ?

Community Guru
Jonathan H Member Since: Jun 19, 2019
19 of 19

Rohan S wrote:

I think you didn't get it well. I said, if everything is well to go. Like client's previous feedback or his communication, dedication and approach...everything. I mean there is nothing wrong. And when the feedback time, they make it bad. Like I do it with you, you did a great job I also said it was great and then I give you 1 star just simply. What would you do ?


But everything is not well, this clients feedback is really poor so it is not really a comparison....

 

IF the clients feedback was all great, and they had history of leaving good feedback for other freelancers and they left you a less than wonderfull star rating......Then i would be thinking - "what went wrong" the client obviously wasnt totally happy with something. However, this is not the case, the client has abysmal feedback and regulary leaves lower start ratings for freelancers. So it was always going to end this way! I think you need to look at the client more before accepting jobs or going for work if 5 stars is an important thing to you.

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS