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Client squeezing prices by promising volume & long term collaboration

emonnier1
Active Member
Eric M Member Since: Mar 20, 2017
1 of 5

Hi,

 

I'm offering translation services.

This is the first job I would get on Upwork so I don't have this kind of experience yet.

 

A potential client invited me on a project and asked for a proposal, promising a daily volume of words to translate and a "long term" collaboration (not clear how long).

The translations are used on a site like Buzzfeed, where you have a big picture and "clickbait" headline, some text, and "native" ads everywhere around.

As a translator, I have to be ready to translate the new content published, between 10am and 7pm.

 

My initial proposal is $0.07 per word.

The potential client asks for $0.02, arguing there would be a daily volume of work (she says), for a longer term (she says), and that she has already 3 other translators ready to work for this price (she says -- and the job description says she needs only one translator).

 

My question: 

- In the probability I accept the $0.02, will there be in the Upwork process a place where there's an agreement between the parties, stating the collaboration on the basis of "xxx volume a day, for a period of xx days, at the price of $ xx"?

- Or this potential client can simply "use" me for 5 days with a volume under what it has been promised but keeping me "waiting" for the fresh content every day, 7 hours a day? And then decide it's not ok for some reason (or me asking for what has been promised but not delivered? and then stopping "being on alert" for nothing?) and stop the job?

 

Looking forward for more information.

I guess I'll pass on this project, but I've another one of the similar vein (but it seems more "serious") so I don't wan't to waste my chances.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Regards

Eric

 

 

 

 

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
BEST ANSWER
2 of 5

@Eric M wrote:

 

> A potential client invited me on a project and asked for a proposal, promising a daily volume of words to translate and a "long term" collaboration (not clear how long).

The translations are used on a site like Buzzfeed,

 

Run. Totally forget it, they hire only bottom rate, bottom quality providers.

 

 

> My initial proposal is $0.07 per word.

The potential client asks for $0.02, arguing there would be a daily volume of work

 

Do you really want to sweat on a long term contract for two cents per word? No translator charges that low even for high volume. I certainly don't.

 

> (she says), for a longer term (she says), and that she has already 3 other translators ready to work for this price 

 

She may be right, there are amateurish translators that work for almost free and deliver the low-quality that sites like Cr@pfeed love. Let them be. Run.

 

 

> Looking forward for more information.

 

Forget about those Bozos.

 

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless

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emonnier1
Active Member
Eric M Member Since: Mar 20, 2017
3 of 5

Thank you for your input Rene.

 

In the meantime the client sent me websites that are already translated in French (my destination language) by the other translators (those at $0.02/word). The client got what he paid for... "throw peanuts and you'll get monkeys".

 

Good day everyone

 

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
4 of 5

Clients like that aim at people who can't get enough work to make ends meet.

 

Their reasoning is "would you not rather earn 2 Cent a word for hours every day, than not earn anything at all?"

 

They will always find "someone" who'll do it.

 

my response is usually that I would much rather translate for one hour at 20 Cent a word, than 10 hours at 2 Cent a word.

charles_kozierok
Community Guru
Charles K Member Since: Mar 6, 2017
5 of 5

The "future work" promise is the most tired cliche in the online freelancing world. It's not always deliberate manipulation, sometimes clients legitimately do plan to have long-term work. It rarely actually happens though.

 

And if they are using it to try to get you to accept an initially low rate, then the future work will also be at the low rate, so why do you even want it?

 

It's good to think long term about building client relationships. But always bid just on what the current job says.

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