sk-andaleeb
Member

Client vanishes After Promising More Work

Hello Upworkers!

 

I am looking for a more specific answer. That is why I am posting a new question. 

 

One of my new clients promised to send me new projects each week. We discussed a $$$ tag and everything went fine for two weeks. Then the client suddenly disappears with a message telling me that they do not have any more work for now. They will be back when they need my services. 

 

Now, this is not the first time it has happened. Clients who overpromise often do not send repeat contracts. Also, I have other great clients, and I can support myself without getting new work from this client. 

 

However, I do feel disturbed by the false promises. It has been over a month since any new assignment was sent my way. My question is, how do you deal with such clients? I want to send him a message, describing the statements about repeat work.  So if the client is unresponsive or again says, they do not have any work, I will end the contract. 

 

Do you have any advice regarding this? Does anyone of you have an email template to communicate with clients who vanish after promising you more work? 

 

I was thinking of writing a message, similar to this one: 

 

"

Thanks for your reply. I am glad you are satisfied with the project deliverables. I thought it would be a long-term contract like you mentioned earlier. Do you have other upcoming projects?

Just asking because I was looking for a consistent workflow.  If this project does not deliver on the promise, then I will accept the offer from another client of mine, and unfortunately, we will have to terminate this contract."

Should I send this message to the client? Do you have suggestions for improving the answer or my way of handling this matter? 

Thanks. 

Have a Great Day Friends!

 

 

ACCEPTED SOLUTION
mthornton-cpc
Member

I don't have a template because it doesn't happen enough to warrant one, but I wouldn't frame it as you have in your suggested message. 

 

When you place blame on the client for the job going dormant you put yourself at risk. It's just not very professional to phrase it as if the client is falling short of your expectation... even if they truly are. I'd try something more along the lines of checking in with the client to see if there is any new work in the pipeline and let them know that you're available if needed. That way you refresh their memory about your work without putting them on the defensive. 

 

If you are troubled by dormant contracts on your plate you can take the same tack, but add that if there is no upcoming work it's fine to close this contract and do a simple rehire when more work is needed. 

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2 REPLIES 2
mthornton-cpc
Member

I don't have a template because it doesn't happen enough to warrant one, but I wouldn't frame it as you have in your suggested message. 

 

When you place blame on the client for the job going dormant you put yourself at risk. It's just not very professional to phrase it as if the client is falling short of your expectation... even if they truly are. I'd try something more along the lines of checking in with the client to see if there is any new work in the pipeline and let them know that you're available if needed. That way you refresh their memory about your work without putting them on the defensive. 

 

If you are troubled by dormant contracts on your plate you can take the same tack, but add that if there is no upcoming work it's fine to close this contract and do a simple rehire when more work is needed. 

tlbp
Member

Hey client, 

I noticed that you have not had any assignments for me recently. If you have a chance, could you please close our current contract? You can easily rehire me if you need additional work and it will help me keep track of my active contracts better. 

 

Thanks!

 

 

OR- Just keep looking for work, fill your schedule and if the client returns, you get to him when you can get to him. 

 

If you need steady work, NEVER leave your schedule open on a promise.  If a client wants to reserve your time, they need to pay you.